106

Is there such a thing in bash or at least something similar (work-around) like forward declarations, well known in C / C++, for instance?

Or there is so such thing because for example it is always executed in one pass (line after line)?

If there are no forward declarations, what should I do to make my script easier to read. It is rather long and these function definitions at the beginning, mixed with global variables, make my script look ugly and hard to read / understand)? I am asking to learn some well-known / best practices for such cases.


For example:

# something like forward declaration
function func

# execution of the function
func

# definition of func
function func
{
    echo 123
}

3 Answers 3

207

Great question. I use a pattern like this for most of my scripts:

#!/bin/bash

main() {
    foo
    bar
    baz
}

foo() {
}

bar() {
}

baz() {
}

main "$@"

You can read the code from top to bottom, but it doesn't actually start executing until the last line. By passing "$@" to main() you can access the command-line arguments $1, $2, et al just as you normally would.

4
  • 3
    Hi, how do you structure data that has to be shared between foo/bar/baz in your example? Usually I just put it at the top of the script. Is this still the case when using functions? Or is it better to put global data in main, and then pass it to foo/bar/baz as arguments? What's the best practice?
    – bodacydo
    Dec 1, 2015 at 1:50
  • 4
    I prefer arguments. Barring that, I'll set global variables in main or in a function right after main (e.g., setup or parseArguments). I avoid having global variables set above main -- code should not go outside of main. Dec 1, 2015 at 2:07
  • This seems somewhat analogous to what if _ _ name _ _ == "_ _ main _ _": main() does in python Feb 13, 2016 at 7:13
  • This is also fantastic when using tools like Bats to test your scripts, breaking everything down into functions makes testing the individual components much easier. See also blog post
    – dragon788
    Aug 9, 2018 at 19:53
33

When my bash scripts grow too much, I use an include mechanism:

File allMyFunctions:

foo() {
}

bar() {
}

baz() {
}

File main:

#!/bin/bash

. allMyfunctions

foo
bar
baz
3
  • 34
    Personally, when a shell script starts growing past one file, I tend to switch to a different language ;-) Nov 28, 2012 at 8:45
  • Wouldn't it be better to use source allMyfunctions?
    – halpdoge
    Sep 12, 2018 at 9:46
  • 4
    @pydoge: source is not POSIX-compliant. bash defines source as an alias to .: they are functionally equivalent.
    – mouviciel
    Sep 12, 2018 at 9:57
0

You can have the script source portions of itself:

#!/bin/bash
. <( sed -n '/^#SOURCE-BEGIN/,/^#SOURCE-END/{//!p;}' $0 )
greeting "$@"
foo hey

#SOURCE-BEGIN
greeting() {
  for i in "$@"
  do
    echo ">[$i]"
  done
}

foo() {
  echo in foo
  echo "arg passed in: $1"
}
#SOURCE-END

echo good bye
$ ./myscript.sh hello world "one string"
>[hello]
>[world]
>[one string]
in foo
arg passed in: hey
good bye

I used process substitution (<(....)) to source the output of the sed command. The sed syntax comes from here, search for What about the classic sed solution?

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