67

I was wondering if there was a function built into Python that can determine the distance between two rational numbers but without me telling it which number is larger. e.g.

>>>distance(6,3)
3
>>>distance(3,6)
3

Obviously I could write a simple definition to calculate which is larger and then just do a simple subtraction:

def distance(x, y):
    if x >= y:
        result = x - y
    else:
        result = y - x
    return result

but I'd rather not have to call a custom function like this. From my limited experience I've often found Python has a built in function or a module that does exactly what you want and quicker than your code does it. Hopefully someone can tell me there is a built in function that can do this.

10 Answers 10

133

abs(x-y) will do exactly what you're looking for:

In [1]: abs(1-2)
Out[1]: 1

In [2]: abs(2-1)
Out[2]: 1
1
  • 1
    But you'll face problem on sign while passing numbers dynamically. shared a working solution below. Please check
    – Siva S
    Nov 11, 2019 at 16:18
25

Although abs(x - y) and equivalently abs(y - x) work, the following one-liners also work:

  • math.dist((x,), (y,)) (available in Python ≥3.8)

  • math.fabs(x - y)

  • max(x - y, y - x)

  • -min(x - y, y - x)

  • max(x, y) - min(x, y)

  • (x - y) * math.copysign(1, x - y), or equivalently (d := x - y) * math.copysign(1, d) in Python ≥3.8

  • functools.reduce(operator.sub, sorted([x, y], reverse=True))

All of these return the euclidean distance(x, y).

1
  • It might be useful to explain why one might choose one solution over another. From an outsider perspective, I would wonder "who cares?" if the shortest solution, abs(x - y) is correct. Apr 12 at 19:46
8

Just use abs(x - y). This'll return the net difference between the two as a positive value, regardless of which value is larger.

0
8

If you have an array, you can also use numpy.diff:

import numpy as np
a = [1,5,6,8]
np.diff(a)
Out: array([4, 1, 2])
2

This does not address the original question, but I thought I would expand on the answer zinturs gave. If you would like to determine the appropriately-signed distance between any two numbers, you could use a custom function like this:

import math

def distance(a, b):
    if (a == b):
        return 0
    elif (a < 0) and (b < 0) or (a > 0) and (b > 0):
        if (a < b):
            return (abs(abs(a) - abs(b)))
        else:
            return -(abs(abs(a) - abs(b)))
    else:
        return math.copysign((abs(a) + abs(b)),b)

print(distance(3,-5))  # -8

print(distance(-3,5))  #  8

print(distance(-3,-5)) #  2

print(distance(5,3))   # -2

print(distance(5,5))   #  0

print(distance(-5,3))  #  8

print(distance(5,-3))  # -8

Please share simpler or more pythonic approaches, if you have one.

4
  • 1
    same tests pass with : import math def distance(a, b): return (max(a, b) - min(a, b)) * (-1 if a > b else 1)
    – pansay
    Jul 20, 2018 at 12:47
  • Surely what pansay has provided would be the best answer to this question? Jan 21, 2021 at 9:45
  • The appropriately signed distance between two numbers (if there is such a thing) is b-a. I find the code needlessly complex and the problem it solves is not defined. Oct 5, 2021 at 7:30
  • This is a ridiculous and pointless answer since abs(a - b) works for distance in all cases. It even returns negative distances sometimes which are invalid.
    – Asclepius
    Dec 12, 2021 at 19:39
2

So simple just use abs((a) - (b)).

will work seamless without any additional care in signs(positive , negative)

def get_distance(p1,p2):
     return abs((p1) - (p2))

get_distance(0,2)
2

get_distance(0,2)
2

get_distance(-2,0)
2

get_distance(2,-1)
3

get_distance(-2,-1)
1
1

use this function.

its the same convention you wanted. using the simple abs feature of python.

also - sometimes the answers are so simple we miss them, its okay :)

>>> def distance(x,y):
    return abs(x-y)
0
0

If you plan to use the signed distance calculation snippet posted by phi (like I did) and your b might have value 0, you probably want to fix the code as described below:

import math

def distance(a, b):
    if (a == b):
        return 0
    elif (a < 0) and (b < 0) or (a > 0) and (b >= 0): # fix: b >= 0 to cover case b == 0
        if (a < b):
            return (abs(abs(a) - abs(b)))
        else:
            return -(abs(abs(a) - abs(b)))
    else:
        return math.copysign((abs(a) + abs(b)),b)

The original snippet does not work correctly regarding sign when a > 0 and b == 0.

-1

abs function is definitely not what you need as it is not calculating the distance. Try abs (-25+15) to see that it's not working. A distance between the numbers is 40 but the output will be 10. Because it's doing the math and then removing "minus" in front. I am using this custom function:


def distance(a, b):
    if (a < 0) and (b < 0) or (a > 0) and (b > 0):
        return abs( abs(a) - abs(b) )
    if (a < 0) and (b > 0) or (a > 0) and (b < 0):
        return abs( abs(a) + abs(b) )

print distance(-25, -15) print distance(25, -15) print distance(-25, 15) print distance(25, 15)

3
  • 1
    abs(-25 - 15) = abs(15 - -25) = 40. I don't know why you used abs(-25 + 15) -- that's an incorrect use of abs in this context. As for distance, def distance(a, b): return abs(a - b).
    – Asclepius
    Nov 15, 2016 at 20:24
  • The question was about the distance. For instance, the distance between -25 and -15 is not 40 it is 10.
    – zinturis
    Nov 16, 2016 at 16:20
  • 1
    And so what? Substituting a and b in abs(a - b) with -25 and -15 gives 10, not 40. In summary, abs(a - b) works for distance. It is noted in the first answer, and not in yours.
    – Asclepius
    Nov 25, 2016 at 0:29
-6

You can try: a=[0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9];

[abs(x[1]-x[0]) for x in zip(a[1:],a[:-1])]

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