18

Consider I have the following stream of data:

BODY1
attrib1:  someval11
attrib2:  someval12
attrib3:  someval13

BODY2
attrib1:  someval21
attrib2:  someval22
attrib3:  someval23

BODY3
attrib1:  someval31
attrib2:  someval32
attrib3:  someval33

I want to extract only attrib1 and attrib3 for each BODY, i.e.

attrib1:  someval11
attrib3:  someval13
attrib1:  someval21
attrib3:  someval23
attrib1:  someval31
attrib3:  someval33

I tried

grep 'attrib1\|attrib3', according to this site but that returned nothing. grep attrib1 and grep attrib2 do return data but just for the single pattern specified.

7
  • Not that it solves your problem, but it may be easier to follow and faster for grep to find if your regex is attrib[13]. Making the common part longer is usually better. Nov 28 '12 at 17:17
  • what if there was no commong pattern between attrib 1 and 3? if they were named something completelty different?
    – amphibient
    Nov 28 '12 at 17:18
  • in the real example, my attrib1 is called foo and attrib3 is called bar...
    – amphibient
    Nov 28 '12 at 17:19
  • Then the attrib[13] trick won't work. Nov 28 '12 at 18:04
  • I don't understand -- does it have to be grep? axiom showed how to do it, but why not just use awk? Am I the only one who finds it simpler for this kind of tasks?
    – loreb
    Nov 29 '12 at 21:38
23

grep -e 'attrib1' -e 'attrib3' file

From the man page :

-e PATTERN, --regexp=PATTERN
Use PATTERN as the pattern. This can be used to specify multiple search patterns, or to protect a pattern beginning with a hyphen (-). (-e is specified by POSIX.)

Edit : Alternatively , you can save patterns in a file and use the -f option :

aman@aman-VPCEB14EN:~$ cat>patt
attrib1
attrib3

aman@aman-VPCEB14EN:~$ grep -f patt test
attrib1:  someval11
attrib3:  someval13
attrib1:  someval21
attrib3:  someval23
attrib1:  someval31
attrib3:  someval33
2
  • grep: illegal option -- e. i am using SunOS
    – amphibient
    Nov 28 '12 at 17:17
  • @foampile You may try and see if -f option is of any use. Also note that for your example, grep 'attrib1\|attrib3' should also work fine.
    – axiom
    Nov 28 '12 at 17:25
18

Very simple command:

 bash> grep  "attrib1\|attrib3" <file.name>
attrib1:  someval11
attrib3:  someval13
attrib1:  someval21
attrib3:  someval23
attrib1:  someval31
attrib3:  someval33
0
15

Also egrep;

egrep "pattern1|pattern2|pattern3" file
1
  • 1
    Or grep -E "pattern1|pattern2|pattern3" file
    – kayochin
    Sep 10 '20 at 12:06
0

This works, with GNU grep 2.6.3

grep "attrib[13]"

or

 grep "^[^0-9]*[13]:"
2
  • what if there was no commong pattern between attrib 1 and 3? if they were named something completelty different?
    – amphibient
    Nov 28 '12 at 17:18
  • What are you looking for, a 1 or 3 on the end of the first word of the line and followed by a colon?
    – Sirch
    Nov 28 '12 at 17:21
0

It depends on the shell you are into. grep -iw 'patter1\|patter2\|pattern3' works on bash shell where as it doesn't work on korn shell. For korn shell we might have to try grep -e pattern1 -e patter2 and so on.

1
  • Which shell you use has no direct bearing on what parameters the grep external command supports.
    – tripleee
    Oct 10 '16 at 20:01

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