109

Is it possible to get the object property name as a string

person = {};
person.first_name = 'Jack';
person.last_name = 'Trades';
person.address = {};
person.address.street = 'Factory 1';
person.address.country = 'USA';

I'd like to use it like this:

var pn = propName( person.address.country ); // should return 'country' or 'person.address.country'
var pn = propName( person.first_name );      // should return 'first_name' or 'person.first_name'

NOTE: this code is exactly what I'm looking for. I understand it sounds even stupid, but it's not.

This is what I want to do with it.

HTML

person = {};
person.id_first_name = 'Jack';
person.id_last_name = 'Trades';
person.address = {};
person.address.id_address = 'Factory 1';
person.address.id_country = 'USA';


extPort.postMessage
(
  {
    message : MSG_ACTION,
    propName( person.first_name ): person.first_name
  }
};

----------------------ANSWER-----------------------

Got it thanks to ibu. He pointed the right way and I used a recursive function

var res = '';

function propName(prop, value) {
    for (var i in prop) {
        if (typeof prop[i] == 'object') {
            if (propName(prop[i], value)) {
                return res;
            }
        } else {
            if (prop[i] == value) {
                res = i;
                return res;
            }
        }
    }
    return undefined;
}

var pn = propName(person, person.first_name); // returns 'first_name'
var pn = propName(person, person.address.country); // returns 'country'

DEMO: http://jsbin.com/iyabal/1/edit

22
  • 8
    I'm confused... why do you want the property name to return the same thing you fed it? You already know the property name then... If you're looking for a way to iterate through properties, you can use the bracket notation and loop through the keys, as properties are also hash indices Commented Nov 28, 2012 at 18:34
  • You need to also pass a reference to the object into the function. Commented Nov 28, 2012 at 18:35
  • Not automatically. The string referenced by country property doesn't know anything about the address object, and the object referenced by the address property doesn't know anything about the person object. Commented Nov 28, 2012 at 18:37
  • 8
    -1 Sorry, your code is really a bad practice. See this example: jsbin.com/iyabal/4/edit ... and en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nestor_Burma as a reference ;-)
    – Christophe
    Commented Nov 28, 2012 at 20:23
  • 2
    This would be useful instead of passing strings around representing a object property name. You could then have static checking, refactoring or mangling. Commented May 28, 2016 at 9:01

18 Answers 18

42

I know a best practice that using Object.keys(your_object). It will parse to array property name for you. Example:

var person = { firstName: 'John', lastName: 'Cena', age: '30' };
var listPropertyNames = Object.keys(person); //["firstName", "lastName", "age"]

I hope this example is useful for you.

2
  • 12
    this does not answer the question, as it will return an array of the keys. the answer should return one string value Commented Jan 23, 2022 at 17:20
  • smh... everything triet said but add .join()
    – Keslavi
    Commented Mar 11, 2022 at 17:44
36

You can accomplish this by creating a mirror object that stores all the property names and call a property with an expression

Javascript version

var person = {};
person.firstname = 'Jack';
person.address = "123 Street";
person.child = { name: 'Example' };

function getPropertyName(obj, expression) {
    var res = {};
    Object.keys(obj).map(k => { res[k] = k; });
    return expression(res);
}

console.log(getPropertyName(person, o => o.address)); // 'address'
console.log(getPropertyName(person.child, o => o.name)); // 'name'

Typescript version (based on @MadSkunk answer)

function getPropertyName<T extends object>(o: T, expression: (x: { [Property in keyof T]: string }) => string) {
  const res = {} as { [Property in keyof T]: string };
  Object.keys(o).map(k => res[k as keyof T] = k);
  return expression(res);
}

console.log(getPropertyName(obj, a => a.firstname)); // 'firstname'
console.log(getPropertyName(obj.child, a => a.name)); // 'name'
3
  • 7
    It is the best solution!
    – Vladislav
    Commented Dec 26, 2018 at 12:10
  • If you see warning about "no return value"; here is the modified version: Object.keys(obj).map(k => { res[k] = () => k; return k;});
    – saygley
    Commented May 9, 2020 at 18:14
  • 3
    FYI I've added a TypeScript version below if anyone's looking for one.
    – MadSkunk
    Commented Apr 20, 2021 at 8:10
28

If anyone's looking for a TypeScript version of MarsRobot's answer, try this:

function nameof<T>(obj: T, expression: (x: { [Property in keyof T]: () => string }) => () => string): string
{
    const res: { [Property in keyof T]: () => string } = {} as { [Property in keyof T]: () => string };

    Object.keys(obj).map(k => res[k as keyof T] = () => k);

    return expression(res)();
}

Usage:

const obj = { 
    property1: 'Jim',
    property2: 'Bloggs',
    property3: 'Bloggs',
    method: () => 'a string',
    child: { property4: 'child1' }
};

const test1 = nameof(obj, x => x.property1);
const test2 = nameof(obj, x => x.property2);
const test3 = nameof(obj, x => x.method);
const test4 = nameof(obj.child, x => x.property4);

console.log(test1);    // -> 'property1'
console.log(test2);    // -> 'property2'
console.log(test3);    // -> 'method'
console.log(test4);    // -> 'property4'

This version works even when objects have multiple properties with the same value (unlike some of the other answers above), and with editors like Visual Studio will provide intellisense for the property names when you get here: nameof(obj, x => x.

4
  • To get rid of the "No index signature with a parameter of type ...." error, you need to add as keyof T to res[k]. It would be res[k as keyof T]. Suggested edit queue is full else I'd add this to the answer myself.
    – Luminous
    Commented May 3, 2022 at 14:15
  • I get an error: TypeError: expression(...) is not a function
    – Olivier.B
    Commented Jul 8, 2022 at 12:01
  • It doesn't work if the property is nullable/optional (prop?) (gives the error said by @Olivier.B) but I don't know how to fix it :)
    – Carlo G
    Commented Aug 29, 2022 at 20:03
  • @CarloG it makes sense since that property may not be defined, therefore Object.keys wouldn't be able to retrieve it. Otherwise you may use nameof(obj, a => a.optional!);
    – artemnih
    Commented May 12, 2023 at 21:51
14

You can wrap your property in a function and then convert the function to a string and get the property out of it.

For example:

function getPropertyName(propertyFunction) {
    return /\.([^\.;]+);?\s*\}$/.exec(propertyFunction.toString())[1];
}

Then to use it:

var myObj = {
    myProperty: "testing"
};

getPropertyName(function() { myObj.myProperty; }); // myProperty

Beware that minifiers could break this.

Edit: I have created a compiler transform that works with babel and the typescript compiler (see ts-nameof). This is a much more reliable than doing something at runtime.

0
10

Using Proxy:

var propName = ( obj ) => new Proxy(obj, {
    get(_, key) {
        return key;
    } 
});


var person = {};
person.first_name = 'Jack';
person.last_name = 'Trades';
person.address = {};
person.address.street = 'Factory 1';
person.address.country = 'USA';

console.log(propName(person).first_name);
console.log(propName(person.address).country);

4
  • 1
    Why does even this work console.log(propName({}).first_name);? Commented Jun 19, 2021 at 23:30
  • 1
    This fails when properties have same value. Commented Jun 20, 2021 at 16:22
  • It's working in JS V8 runtime, eg. substituting same values: person.last_name = person.first_name; and person.address.country = person.first_name; or that substitution using = 'Jack' instead of = person.first_name;
    – Matthew
    Commented Mar 10 at 0:17
  • This answer is the best. It works. It's brief and clear. It's performant in speed/operations, in memory, in complexity (no iteration in the source code, no extra generations filtered by yet more operations, no risky exec()s), no extra objects. It uses Proxy for exactly the reflection Proxy is designed to do.
    – Matthew
    Commented Mar 10 at 0:26
9

I use the following in TypeScript. This way retains type-information and disallows selecting non-existing property keys.

export function getPropertyName<T extends object>(obj: T, selector: (x: Record<keyof T, keyof T>) => keyof T): keyof T {
  const keyRecord = Object.keys(obj).reduce((res, key) => {
    const typedKey = key as keyof T
    res[typedKey] = typedKey
    return res
  }, {} as Record<keyof T, keyof T>)
  return selector(keyRecord)
}

const obj = {
  name: 'test',
  address: {
    street: 'test',
  }
}

console.log(getPropertyName(obj, (x) => x.name)) // name
console.log(getPropertyName(obj.address, (x) => x.street)) // street
1
  • Do you have a simple example how to use this method?
    – tno2007
    Commented Jun 26, 2020 at 11:36
8

Yes you can, with a little change.

function propName(prop, value){
   for(var i in prop) {
       if (prop[i] == value){
            return i;
       }
   }
   return false;
}

Now you can get the value like so:

 var pn = propName(person,person.first_name);
 // pn = "first_name";

Note I am not sure what it can be used for.

Other Note wont work very well with nested objects. but then again, see the first note.

2
  • 39
    This assumes that no two properties will have the same value in an object.
    – Sampson
    Commented Nov 28, 2012 at 18:38
  • your function returns 'first_name' if you pass person.first_name but if you use person.address.street returns false. maybe using it recursively?
    – CLiFoS
    Commented Nov 28, 2012 at 18:54
6

I like one liners, here's a generic solution:

const propName = (obj,type) => Object.keys(obj).find(key => obj[key] === type)

propName(person, person.age)
1
  • 2
    this will give a wrong result in case the value of 2 keys are the same. ex: person = {old: 25, name:'John', age: 25}; propName(person, person.age); // return "old" Commented Jan 23, 2022 at 17:03
3

Following up on @David Sherret's answer with ES6 it can be made super simple:

propName = f => /\.([^\.;]+);?\s*\}$/.exec(f.toString())[1]
let prop = propName(() => {obj.name}); // myProperty
1

I prefer it clean and simple like this:

var obj = {
  sessionId: 123,
  branchId: 456,
  seasonId: 789
};

var keys = Object.keys(obj);

for (var i in keys) {
  console.log(keys[i]); //output of keys as string
}
4
  • 2
    And how do you get a specific key? Commented Aug 11, 2019 at 17:00
  • Why shoult Object.keys return a specific key? The point from that question was, to get the key of an object as a string!? Or not? I‘m confused now... Commented Aug 12, 2019 at 21:48
  • Yes, but you iterate over ALL keys. There is no chance getting a specific property name with your solution. Commented Aug 13, 2019 at 9:56
  • 1
    Ah, I got it! No, my solution is only for all keys, you‘re right. I misunderstood the question. Commented Aug 14, 2019 at 18:50
0

You could create a namespacing method for the object. The method will need to mutate the object so that the strings becomes an object instead to hold two properties, a value and a _namespace.

DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/y4Y8p/1/

var namespace = function(root, name) {
    root._namespace = name;
    function ns(obj) {
        for( var i in obj ) {
            var a = obj._namespace.split('.')
            if ( a.length ) {
                a.push(i);
            }
            if( typeof obj[i] == 'object' ) {
                obj[i]._namespace = a.join('.');
                ns(obj[i]);
                return;
            }
            if( typeof obj[i] == 'string' ) {
                var str = obj[i].toString();
                obj[i] = {
                    _namespace: a.join('.'),
                    value: str
                };
            }
        }
    }
    ns(root);
};

namespace(person, 'person');

console.log(person.address.street._namespace) // person.address.street
console.log(person.address.street.value) // 'Factory 1'

So now you can do:

var o = { message: MSG_ACTION };
o[ person.first_name._namespace ] = person.first_name.value;

extPort.postMessage(o);
3
  • I was fascinated by this answer so I started hacking away at it to try and find a cleaner approach. here is what I've come up with so far, what do you think: jsfiddle.net/y4Y8p/17 Commented Nov 28, 2012 at 20:38
  • @JasonSperske nice, but it’s not recursive so it only works 3 levels deep: jsfiddle.net/y4Y8p/18 Commented Nov 28, 2012 at 20:42
  • jsfiddle.net/y4Y8p/22 try it now :) There are still larger problems, like it takes all values and casts them to strings, but this is a fun bit of code to play with Commented Nov 28, 2012 at 20:48
0

I am in same situation.

Here is thy way to get it done using Lodash or UnderScore library, with one limitation of value to be unique:

var myObject = {
'a': 1,
'b': 2,
'c': 3
}
_.findKey(myObject, function( curValue ) { return myObject.a === curValue });

Plain JavaScript

function getPropAsString( source, value ){
    var keys = Object.keys( source );

    var curIndex,
        total,
        foundKey;

    for(curIndex = 0, total = keys.length; curIndex < total; curIndex++){
        var curKey = keys[ curIndex ];
        if ( source[ curKey ] === value ){
            foundKey = curKey;
            break;
        }
    }

    return foundKey;
}

var myObject = {
'a': 1,
'b': 2,
'c': 3
}
getPropAsString( myObject, myObject.a )

But, I would prefer to fix the code as solution. An example:

var myObject = {
'a': {key:'a', value:1},
'b': {key:'b', value:2},
'c': {key:'c', value:3}
}

console.log( myObject.a.key )
0

I am late to the party but I took a completely different approach, so I will throw in my approach and see what the community thinks.

I used Function.prototype.name to do what I want. my properties are functions that when called return the value of the property, and I can get the name of the property (which is a function) using .name

Here is an example:

person = {
    firstName(){
        return 'John';
    },
    address(){
        return '123 street'
    }
}

person.firstName.name // 'firstName'
person.address.name // 'address'

Note:
you can't easily change the value of a property (e.g firstname) at run time in this case. you would need to create a function (.name would be anonymous in this case) and this function would return a new named function which return the new value:

// note the () at the end     
person.firstName = new Function('', 'return function firstName(){return "johny"}')(); 
person.firstName.name ; // 'firstName' 
person.firstName(); // 'johny'
3
  • @Please_Dont_Bully_Me_SO_Lords, Hence the sentence: "my properties are functions that when called return the value of the property" Commented Feb 14, 2019 at 13:36
  • and that's why I made it clear in my answer: 1- I am taking a different approach, 2- my properties are functions, 3- I have a note about how you should update the value of a property. By no means I am suggesting that this is the best approach, I am just proposing a way to do what OP wants to do. In his example it is a string because he is using plain attributes, in my approach I am wrapping them in functions. OP can use my answer to add wrapper around his attributes. My attributes are functions syntactically, yes. but, semantically, my attributes are the result of the function call, Commented Feb 14, 2019 at 13:56
  • @Please_Dont_Bully_Me_SO_Lords, if you see anyway this answer can be improved, please be my guest. Thank you. Commented Feb 14, 2019 at 13:57
0

Improved Solution for TypeScript using PROXY from Isk1n solution:

//get property name
export function getPropertyName<T>(obj: any): T {
  return new Proxy(obj, {
    get(_, key) {
      return key;
    }
  });
}

and usage:

sampleItem: TestClass = new TestClass();
getPropertyName<TestClass>(this.sampleItem).LayoutVersion

0

Here is a solution that uses Proxy.

selectorToPropertyPath converts any property selector callback into an array of properties.

const target = {};

const handler = (parents = []) => ({
    get: (target, property) => {
        if (property in target) {
            return target[property];
        }
        
        target[property] = new Proxy({
            __path: [...parents, property],
        }, handler([...parents, property]));
        
        return target[property];
    },
});

const proxy = new Proxy(target, handler());

const selectorToPropertyPath = (selector) =>
    selector(proxy).__path;


// Usage:
const accessId = (data) => data.id;
const accessGroupId = (data) => data.group.id;
const accessRandomProperties = (data) => data['one'].two['three'].four['five'];

console.log(selectorToPropertyPath(accessId));
console.log(selectorToPropertyPath(accessGroupId));
console.log(selectorToPropertyPath(accessRandomProperties));


// NOTE: Property `__path` is reserved to store path info. This will return the correct path:
console.log(selectorToPropertyPath(data => data.__path));
// ...however, this will return invalid path:
console.log(selectorToPropertyPath(data => data.__path.__path));

TypeScript implementation:

type Target = {
    [key: string | symbol]: Target;
} & { __path?: (string | symbol)[] };

const target: Target = {};

const handler: (parens?: (string | symbol)[]) => ProxyHandler<typeof target> = (parents = []) => ({
    get: (target, property) => {
        if (property in target) {
            return target[property];
        }

        target[property] = new Proxy({
            __path: [...parents, property],
        } as Target, handler([...parents, property]));

        return target[property];
    },
});

const proxy = new Proxy(target, handler());
0

I think you need to solve for each depth of the object.

Here's a solution using the string from Object.keys()

const PersonKeyStrings = Object.keys(Person).reduce((mem, keySt) => 
  (mem[keySt] = keySt, mem), {})

let first_name_str = PersonKeyStrings.first_name
let first_name_value = Person[first_name_str]
0

I suggest to use Proxies

const someObject = {
  prop1:'value1',
  prop2:'value2'
} 


function nameof(obj, getter) {
  const handler = {
    get(target, prop, receiver) {
      target
      receiver
      return prop
    }
  }
  return getter(new Proxy(obj, handler))
}

console.log(nameof(someObject, x => x.prop1))

-2

No, it's not possible.

Imagine this:

person.age = 42;
person.favoriteNumber = 42;

var pn = propName(person.age)
// == propName(42)
// == propName(person.favoriteNumber);

The reference to the property name is simply lost in that process.

0

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