128

Is there something like "die" in JavaScript? I've tried with "break", but doesn't work :)

7
  • 2
    see this: stackoverflow.com/questions/550574/…
    – stefita
    Sep 1, 2009 at 9:20
  • "die", like "goto" are not complient with structured programming. These types of instructions should never be used for serious project. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Structured_programming Apr 25, 2013 at 14:10
  • 3
    function die(str) {throw new Error(str || "Script ended by death");} Or something XD Plenty of better options out there, but this would work. Might be good for debugging, if you only want to run the first part of a script to make sure it works. Oct 18, 2013 at 19:37
  • @stefita Why is not your comment into the answers?? exit() was just what i need. The other way, is to run an autocall loop, will run 1599 times then stop the execution. Thx.
    – m3nda
    Feb 4, 2015 at 19:15
  • @AdrianMaire Your heart's in the right place, but the "why" of a question shouldn't be at issue. The evils of die, goto, eval, etc. are endlessly regurgitated (and not without merit), but they all have their special uses, especially for low-level debugging. Otherwise languages wouldn't include them. In this case, the JS equivalents of return and throw are innocuous enough.
    – Beejor
    Jun 13, 2015 at 16:35

14 Answers 14

236
throw new Error("my error message");
5
  • 7
    this is absolutely the answer and works just like die(); however one should not care for the red "1 Error" of firebug!
    – Alexar
    Dec 21, 2010 at 23:52
  • 3
    I think that if PHP has a "firebug" equivalent, it should also write "1 error" on die() ;-) Good answer! Apr 25, 2013 at 14:04
  • 1
    Won't this produce a warning dialog box in IE8? Sep 28, 2013 at 14:15
  • Not a 1-to-1 equivalent, since PHP has uncaught exceptions too.
    – Brilliand
    May 30, 2014 at 20:07
  • This will not totally stop execution AFAIK, but only roughly around the throw. Specifics are very blurry but I'm pretty sure the script can keep running somewhere else.
    – Rolf
    Jan 29, 2016 at 10:36
37

You can only break a block scope if you label it. For example:

myBlock: {
  var a = 0;
  break myBlock;
  a = 1; // this is never run
};
a === 0;

You cannot break a block scope from within a function in the scope. This means you can't do stuff like:

foo: { // this doesn't work
  (function() {
    break foo;
  }());
}

You can do something similar though with functions:

function myFunction() {myFunction:{
  // you can now use break myFunction; instead of return;
}}
3
  • 6
    I never knew about labelling a block scope much less writing a block scope. Does it mean that foo: {} is an object?
    – enchance
    Jan 7, 2012 at 18:40
  • 4
    No. It's a block scope. It's the same as foo: if(true){...}
    – Eli Grey
    Jan 7, 2012 at 18:52
  • Is there any alternative since you can't "break a block scope from within a function in the scope"? May 22, 2019 at 22:31
24

You can simply use the return; example

$(document).ready(function () {
        alert(1);
        return;
        alert(2);
        alert(3);
        alert(4);
});

The return will return to the main caller function test1(); and continue from there to test3();

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" dir="ltr" lang="en">
<head>
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" />
</head>
<body>
<script type="text/javascript">
function test1(){
    test2();
    test3();
}

function test2(){
    alert(2);
    return;
    test4();
    test5();
}

function test3(){
    alert(3);
}

function test4(){
    alert(4);
}

function test5(){
    alert(5);
}
test1();

</script>
</body>
</html>

but if you just add throw ''; this will completely stop the execution without causing any errors.

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" dir="ltr" lang="en">
<head>
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8" />
</head>
<body>
<script type="text/javascript">
function test1(){
    test2();
    test3();
}

function test2(){
    alert(2);
    throw '';   
    test4();
    test5();
}

function test3(){
    alert(3);
}

function test4(){
    alert(4);
}

function test5(){
    alert(5);
}
test1();

</script>
</body>
</html>

This is tested with firefox and chrome. I don't know how this is handled by IE or Safari

3
  • 2
    As far as I know, return exits only the enclosing function. It does not work when you want to stop executing the whole script. Apr 18, 2013 at 18:39
  • 1
    hmmm yes you are right, it does not stop the execution of all the script.
    – themhz
    Apr 22, 2013 at 9:26
  • throw "": ...without causing any errors... - Not quite... Uncaught ""
    – FZs
    Jul 2, 2019 at 8:31
18

Just call die() without ever defining it. Your script will crash. :)

When I do this, I usually call discombobulate() instead, but the principle is the same.

(Actually, what this does is throw a ReferenceError, making it roughly the same as spudly's answer - but it's shorter to type, for debugging purposes.)

3
  • The use of a custom undefined identifier is very creative! I like how die is intuitive and concise. It does lack the benefit of throw when it comes to logging a specific error message, but sometimes just the line number is enough. BTW, die; without the parentheses (un-)works too.
    – Beejor
    Jun 13, 2015 at 16:49
  • or just die; at the line where you want your javascript to stop.
    – MarcoZen
    Dec 29, 2017 at 10:54
  • This answer is so JS minded^^ It's not dirty if it works! Jan 21, 2019 at 13:41
12

If you're using nodejs, you can use

process.exit(<code>);
2
  • 5
    If this would be about node.js, the question would have the tag node.js
    – FelixSFD
    Nov 19, 2016 at 19:20
  • 4
    @FelixSFD: Still it helped me, as I was searching for exactly this, completely disregarding the tags ;)
    – D. E.
    Jan 6, 2017 at 13:42
7

It is possible to roll your own version of PHP's die:

function die(msg)
{
    throw msg;
}

function test(arg1)
{
    arg1 = arg1 || die("arg1 is missing"); 
}

test();

JSFiddle Example

2
  • I wanted to mention that this won't work in cases like var a = arguments[3] || die('message'). instead, I think die should be: function die(msg) { return eval(`throw "${msg}"`);) but even then, I think this should just be hard placed on the line that breaks so that the error shows which line failed, eg this.inputFile = argv[2] || eval('throw "this program requires an input file."');
    – Dmytro
    Jul 10, 2016 at 18:08
  • Probably, not sure eval() solves the problem if I'm understanding you. Ideally one would be looking at a stack trace if you were interested in where a failure was actually ocuring. Otherwise I would think it's safe to assume that you simply want to report some sort of basic failure message tor your user.
    – Kelmar
    Aug 24, 2016 at 18:40
7

you can try with :

return;   

that work in case of stop process.

5

There is no function exit equivalent to php die() in JS, if you are not using any function then you can simply use return;

return;
4

use firebug and the glorious...

debugger;

and never let the debugger make any step forward. Cleaner than throwing a proper Error, innit?

1
  • 2
    Not exactly the same!
    – Rolf
    Jan 29, 2016 at 10:34
3

Global die() function for development purposes:

var die = function(msg) {
    throw new Error(msg);
}

Use die():

die('Error message here');
2

There's no exact equaliant of language construct die of PHP in Javascript. die in PHP is pretty much equal to System.exit() in Java, which terminates the current script and calls shutdown hooks. As some users suggested; throw Error can be used in some cases, however it never guarantees the termination of the current script. There can be always an exception handling block surrounding your throw statement- unless you call it on the top most level script block, which eventually exits only the script block you're executing.

However it won't prevent the second block from being executed here (prints hello):

<script type="text/javascript">
  throw new Error('test');
</script>
<script type="text/javascript">
  document.write("hello");
</script> 
1

This should kind of work like die();

function die(msg = ''){
    if(msg){
        document.getElementsByTagName('html')[0].innerHTML = msg;
    }else{
        document.open();
        document.write(msg);
        document.close();
    }
    throw msg;
}
0

You can use return false; This will terminate your script.

2
  • 3
    Only at the top level, presumably. PHP's die() can be called at any level and will cause the PHP interpreter to go away right there.
    – Rolf
    Jan 29, 2016 at 10:33
  • No, it will not. It will terminate/return the current enclosing function, and just exit that function and proceed. Jun 28, 2022 at 9:17
-8
<script>
     alert("i am ajith fan");
     <?php die(); ?>
     alert("i love boxing");
     alert("i love MMA");
</script>
0

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