I have the following input:

  <input id="fieldName" name="fieldName" type="text" class="text_box" value="Firstname"/>

How can I use jQuery to make this element a read-only input without changing the element or its value?

  • you mean you want a read-only input? – Russ Cam Sep 1 '09 at 12:16
  • or a disabled input? – Russ Cam Sep 1 '09 at 12:17
  • or adding label to the field? – Odif Yltsaeb Sep 1 '09 at 12:17
  • 1
    He said 'same but value is non-editable'. I think he means read-only. – karim79 Sep 1 '09 at 12:18
  • He also said. not as input box. so i think that perhaps he meant a way to add label to a field, that copies the value of inputbox and sets it its own text? – Odif Yltsaeb Sep 1 '09 at 12:21

11 Answers 11

These days with jQuery 1.6.1 or above it is recommended that .prop() be used when setting boolean attributes/properties.

$("#fieldName").prop("readonly", true);
  • 8
    +1 for using .prop(). This one should be marked the correct answer as jQuery now state they want you to use .prop() instead of .attr() for properties like these. – Evildonald Apr 24 '13 at 20:31

simply add the following attribute

// for disabled i.e. cannot highlight value or change
disabled="disabled"

// for readonly i.e. can highlight value but not change
readonly="readonly"

jQuery to make the change to the element (substitute disabled for readonly in the following for setting readonly attribute).

$('#fieldName').attr("disabled","disabled") 

or

$('#fieldName').attr("disabled", true) 

NOTE: As of jQuery 1.6, it is recommended to use .prop() instead of .attr(). The above code will work exactly the same except substitute .attr() for .prop().

  • 2
    disabling a field isn't the same as making it not editable, right? disabling it will make it also not submit – Dave May 30 '15 at 4:03
  • 1
    @Dave correct. Also readonly inputs can be focused, disabled inputs can't – Russ Cam May 30 '15 at 4:10

To make an input readonly use:

 $("#fieldName").attr('readonly','readonly');

to make it read/write use:

$("#fieldName").removeAttr('readonly');

adding the disabled attribute won't send the value with post.

  • 2
    +1 Yes you're right.When we do "disabled" it will not send value with post.So we have to use "readonly" – Sampath Feb 19 '13 at 13:30

You can do this by simply marking it disabled or enabled. You can use this code to do this:

//for disable
$('#fieldName').prop('disabled', true);

//for enable 
$('#fieldName').prop('disabled', false);

--- Its better to use prop instead of attr.

  • 3
    Disabled inputs do not get submitted on form post/get. – Nielsvh Jun 27 '16 at 15:55

Use this example to make text box ReadOnly or Not.

<input type="textbox" class="txt" id="txt"/>
<input type="button" class="Btn_readOnly" value="Readonly" />
<input type="button" class="Btn_notreadOnly" value="Not Readonly" />

<script>

    $(document).ready(function(){
       ('.Btn_readOnly').click(function(){
           $("#txt").prop("readonly", true);
       });

       ('.Btn_notreadOnly').click(function(){
           $("#txt").prop("readonly", false);
       });
    });

</script>

Maybe use atribute disabled:

<input disabled="disabled" id="fieldName" name="fieldName" type="text" class="text_box" />

Or just use label tag: ;)

<label>
  • 1
    display: none;? – Kobi Sep 1 '09 at 13:06
  • thx for notice I copied it from question source ... ;) – IProblemFactory Sep 1 '09 at 13:29
  • 1
    The question said "With jQuery" (which implies it should be done dynamically) and "read-only" (which is different to disabled). – Quentin Sep 1 '09 at 13:31
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head >
    <title></title>

    <script type="text/javascript" src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.3.2/jquery.min.js"></script>

</head>
<body>
    <div>
        <input id="fieldName" name="fieldName" type="text" class="text_box" value="Firstname" />
    </div>
</body>

<script type="text/javascript">
    $(function()
    {
        $('#fieldName').attr('disabled', 'disabled');

    });
</script>
</html>

Perhaps it's meaningful to also add that

$('#fieldName').prop('readonly',false);

can be used as a toggle option..

In JQuery 1.12.1, my application uses code:

$('"#raisepay_id"')[0].readOnly=true;

$('"#raisepay_id"')[0].readOnly=false;

and it works.

The setReadOnly(state) is very useful for forms, we can set any field to setReadOnly(state) directly or from various condition.But I prefer to use readOnly for setting opacity to the selector otherwise the attr='disabled' also worked like the same way.

readOnly examples:

$('input').setReadOnly(true);

or through the various codition like

var same = this.checked;
$('input').setReadOnly(same);

here we are using the state boolean value to set and remove readonly attribute from the input depending on a checkbox click.

  • the above examples don't work - setReadOnly isn't a function built into jquery or any browsers – Dave B 84 Nov 30 '15 at 10:57

In html

$('#raisepay_id').attr("readonly", true) 

$("#raisepay_id").prop("readonly",true);

in bootstrap

$('#raisepay_id').attr("disabled", true) 

$("#raisepay_id").prop("disabled",true);

JQuery is a changing library and sometimes they make regular improvements. .attr() is used to get attributes from the HTML tags, and while it is perfectly functional .prop() was added later to be more semantic and it works better with value-less attributes like 'checked' and 'selected'.

It is advised that if you are using a later version of JQuery you should use .prop() whenever possible.

  • 2
    I voted this down because it is nonsensical. It's all HTML, JavaScript, and Bootstrap uses jQuery so that fact is not even relevant. Additionally disabled and read only are two different things which work independent of whether or not Bootstrap is used. – simontemplar Aug 2 '15 at 6:46
  • Down voted as well, answer makes no sense. – Drachenfels Nov 23 '16 at 16:18

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