14

If I declare a variable inside a foreach loop, such as:

foreach($myArray as $myData) {
    $myVariable = 'x';
}

Does PHP destroy it, and re-creates it at each iteration ? In other words, would it be smarter performance-wise to do:

$myVariable;
foreach($myArray as $myData) {
    $myVariable = 'x';
}

Thank you in advance for your insights.

  • may be like global and local variable – rOcKiNg RhO Nov 29 '12 at 13:24
  • 3
    No, it doesn't; and the variable still exists outside of the loop bafter you have finished iterating. It is only "destroyed" when you exit the function where the loop is defined.... even your $myData variable will still exist after the loop has finished, holding the value of the last element in $myData.... this can be particularly tricky if you've used it by reference – Mark Baker Nov 29 '12 at 13:31
  • 1
    Variable can be _destroyed by unsetting it. – Salman A Nov 29 '12 at 13:31
  • Variables in PHP are neither destroyed nor created. They might be undefined, but that won't PHP prevent to use them. Also the common rules of scope apply, and foreach is nothing special here. – hakre Nov 29 '12 at 16:02
21

In your first example:

foreach($myArray as $myData) {
    $myVariable = 'x';
}

$myVariable is created during the first iteration and than overwritten on each further iteration. It will not be destroyed at any time before leaving the scope of your script, function, method, ...

In your second example:

$myVariable;
foreach($myArray as $myData) {
    $myVariable = 'x';
}

$myVariable is created before any iteration and set to null. During each iteration if will be overwritten. It will not be destroyed at any time before leaving the scope of your script, function, method, ...

Update

I missed to mention the main difference. If $myArray is empty (count($myArray) === 0) $myVariable will not be created in your first example, but in your second it will with a value of null.

  • 3
    both of your examples are basically the same. Wether you declare a variable before the loop or in the loop, the variable will have the value it had at the end of the last iteration. The variable will not be destroyed after the foreach loop, even if you didn't declare it before the loop. This is something typical for PHP and doesn't happen in most other programming languages. – Jules Colle Nov 29 '12 at 13:32
  • In addition, if you do need to destroy a variable from within a loop like this you can use unset(): php.net/manual/en/function.unset.php – diggersworld Nov 29 '12 at 13:32
  • 2
    @Jules These are not my examples, these are the examples from the question! – eisberg Nov 29 '12 at 13:33
  • @eisberg: Undefined variables in PHP have always the value of NULL. You should explain why this should be special with foreach because it is not. – hakre Nov 29 '12 at 16:02
  • @hakre I am (like everyone of us should) programming in error_reporting(-1); (yes all the time) and uninitialized variables give errors and are just plain wrong. – eisberg Nov 29 '12 at 17:11
2

According to the debugger in my IDE (NuSphere PHPed) in your first example:

foreach($myArray as $myData) {
    $myVariable = 'x';
}

$myVariable is only created once.

2

According to my experiment, it's the same:

<?php
for($i = 0; $i < 3; $i++) {
    $myVariable = $i;
}
var_dump($myVariable);

prints: int(2)

<?php
$myVariable;
for($i = 0; $i < 3; $i++) {
    $myVariable = $i;
}
var_dump($myVariable);

prints: int(2)

  • 2
    The first one would throw an error if it hadn't been assigned to in the for loop, whereas the second one wouldn't. – diggersworld Nov 29 '12 at 13:34
  • @diggersworld Surprisingly, it doesn't throw an error (notice) for me. Does it for you? – user4035 Nov 29 '12 at 13:59
  • 2
    ah, no it doesn't, sorry. I thought it would have. That's interesting. – diggersworld Nov 29 '12 at 15:50
  • 1
    @diggersworld @user4035 Perhaps you don't have all errors turned on? When I ran the first snippet with for($i = 0; $i < 0; $i++) it generated the error 'Notice: Undefined variable: myVariable in - on line 6' as expected. – Chris Middleton Feb 2 '15 at 21:11
  • @AmadeusDrZaius Yes, I didn't have notices turned on. PHP will define this variable on the fly. – user4035 Feb 2 '15 at 22:27
0

The problem is $myVariable is not truly local to foreach only. So it can clobber a global variable under the same name.

A way around that is make your foreach an inline anonymous function.

E.g.

$myforeach=function(&$myArray){ // pass by ref only if modifying it
  foreach($myArray as $myData) {
    $myVariable = 'x';
  }
};
$myforeach($myArray);  // execute anonymous.

This way you guarantee it will not step on other globals.

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