277

I'm using 2.3 IDLE and I'm having problems.

I need to check whether a number is between two other numbers, 10000 and 30000:

if number >= 10000 and number >= 30000:
    print ("you have to pay 5% taxes")

It's not working too well.

800
if 10000 <= number <= 30000:
    pass
  • 169
    Python is so nice :). And to be redundant: this is called "interval comparison." – Matt Montag Feb 11 '14 at 7:12
  • What is the speed difference between this and if number in range(10000, 30001) as suggested by other solution? Additionally, is it faster or slower when using set instead of range? – Sung Cho Aug 12 '15 at 0:37
  • 12
    @MikeC With the interval comparison number is first compared against 10000. If it's less than 10000 the expression is immediately short-circuited and the second comparison is not checked. The complexity is O(1). in range(0, n) instead generates the entire sequence of numbers and then iterates through it. The complexity is O(n). The complexity of in set(range(0, n)) is still O(n) because building a set has a time complexity of O(n) ics.uci.edu/~pattis/ICS-33/lectures/complexitypython.txt – Paolo Moretti Aug 12 '15 at 12:16
  • 4
    @MikeC Try to run in your shell: > python -m timeit '10000 <= 10 <= 30000' > python -m timeit '10 in range(10000, 30001)' > python -m timeit '10 in set(range(10000, 30001))' – Paolo Moretti Aug 12 '15 at 12:20
  • 1
    looks like in python3.5.2, range is ~10x slower than the if statement, with speed constant in regard to range check value...thus most likely difference due to function overhead. – amohr Nov 10 '16 at 0:21
57
r=range(1,4)

>>> 1 in r
True
>>> 2 in r
True
>>> 3 in r
True
>>> 4 in r
False
>>> 5 in r
False
>>> 0 in r
False
  • 3
    Wow I always thought range (or xrange in python2) returns a generator thus you cannot repeatedly test on it. – yegle Mar 3 '14 at 16:44
  • 18
    Its important to so keep in mind that 4 in range(1,4) is False. So better use the 1 >= r <= 4 as it avoids possible errors by newcomers – tripplet Jun 26 '14 at 8:01
  • 38
    1.5 in r gives False, even in 3.4. This answer is only good for integers. – jpmc26 Jan 5 '16 at 17:49
  • 7
    @tripplet, you made the same error as the OP!, It should be 1 <= r <= 4 – John La Rooy Mar 9 '16 at 0:16
  • 4
    (1.) bad performance (as others have pointed out this syntax looks good but can take a long time to execute because it is O(n) operations vs the if a <= x <= b...) (2.) doesn't work for float types (3.) the range test is not-inclusive... so many developers may introduce bugs because they expect inclusive range – Trevor Boyd Smith Nov 3 '17 at 16:05
45

Your operator is incorrect. Should be if number >= 10000 and number <= 30000:. Additionally, Python has a shorthand for this sort of thing, if 10000 <= number <= 30000:.

  • 26
    @twosnac Notice how I posted this at literally the same minute as the accepted answer? And more than 5 years ago? – Silas Ray Jan 4 '18 at 19:45
22

Your code snippet,

if number >= 10000 and number >= 30000:
    print ("you have to pay 5% taxes")

actually checks if number is larger than both 10000 and 30000.

Assuming you want to check that the number is in the range 10000 - 30000, you could use the Python interval comparison:

if 10000 <= number <= 30000:
    print ("you have to pay 5% taxes")

This Python feature is further described in the Python documentation.

8
if number >= 10000 and number <= 30000:
    print ("you have to pay 5% taxes")
5

The trouble with comparisons is that they can be difficult to debug when you put a >= where there should be a <=

#                             v---------- should be <
if number >= 10000 and number >= 30000:
    print ("you have to pay 5% taxes")

Python lets you just write what you mean in words

if number in xrange(10000, 30001): # ok you have to remember 30000 + 1 here :)

In Python3, you need to use range instead of xrange.

edit: People seem to be more concerned with microbench marks and how cool chaining operations. My answer is about defensive (less attack surface for bugs) programming.

As a result of a claim in the comments, I've added the micro benchmark here for Python3.5.2

$ python3.5 -m timeit "5 in range(10000, 30000)"
1000000 loops, best of 3: 0.266 usec per loop
$ python3.5 -m timeit "10000 <= 5 < 30000"
10000000 loops, best of 3: 0.0327 usec per loop

If you are worried about performance, you could compute the range once

$ python3.5 -m timeit -s "R=range(10000, 30000)" "5 in R"
10000000 loops, best of 3: 0.0551 usec per loop
  • 2
    xrange is deprecated in Python 3, unfortunately. – apraetor Mar 2 '16 at 15:44
  • @apraetor, yes use range(10000, 30001) in Python3. It doesn't create a list – John La Rooy Mar 2 '16 at 19:38
  • your solution will iterate over 20 thousand integers. using <= and <= is much more efficient. – JB Chouinard Mar 8 '16 at 15:53
  • 1
    @JBChouinard, you are absolutely incorrect. xrange in Python2, or range in Python3 have membership tests. Try it yourself if you don't believe. <= is only more efficient because it doesn't create a range object. Both ways as O(1). The point is the OP was trying to do it your way and ended up with a bug. Fast code that is wrong is worse. – John La Rooy Mar 8 '16 at 18:05
  • 1
    on an i5, (i)python 3.5: %timeit 5 in range(10000, 30000) 1000 loops, best of 3: 451 µs per loop. %timeit 10000 <= 5 <= 30000 10000000 loops, best of 3: 59.4 ns per loop. that's a factor of over 7000 – tback Nov 10 '16 at 10:03
4

Define the range between the numbers:

r = range(1,10)

Then use it:

if num in r:
    print("All right!")
  • 2
    range doesn't count the last value 10 in your case . range(1,11) is correct, if you need to compare between 1 and 10 – ikbel benabdessamad Apr 18 at 9:07
1

There are two ways to compare three integers and check whether b is between a and c:

if a < b < c:
    pass

and

if a < b and b < c:
    pass

The first one looks like more readable, but the second one runs faster.

Let's compare using dis.dis:

    >>> dis.dis('a < b and b < c')
  1           0 LOAD_NAME                0 (a)
              2 LOAD_NAME                1 (b)
              4 COMPARE_OP               0 (<)
              6 JUMP_IF_FALSE_OR_POP    14
              8 LOAD_NAME                1 (b)
             10 LOAD_NAME                2 (c)
             12 COMPARE_OP               0 (<)
        >>   14 RETURN_VALUE
>>> dis.dis('a < b < c')
  1           0 LOAD_NAME                0 (a)
              2 LOAD_NAME                1 (b)
              4 DUP_TOP
              6 ROT_THREE
              8 COMPARE_OP               0 (<)
             10 JUMP_IF_FALSE_OR_POP    18
             12 LOAD_NAME                2 (c)
             14 COMPARE_OP               0 (<)
             16 RETURN_VALUE
        >>   18 ROT_TWO
             20 POP_TOP
             22 RETURN_VALUE
>>>

and using timeit:

~$ python3 -m timeit "1 < 2 and 2 < 3"
10000000 loops, best of 3: 0.0366 usec per loop

~$ python3 -m timeit "1 < 2 < 3"
10000000 loops, best of 3: 0.0396 usec per loop

also, you may use range, as suggested before, however it is much more slower.

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