522

I have an image element that I want to change on click.

<img id="btnLeft">

This works:

#btnLeft:hover {
    width: 70px;
    height: 74px;
}

But what I need is:

#btnLeft:onclick {
    width: 70px;
    height: 74px;
}

But, it doesn't work, obviously. Is it possible at all to have onclick behavior in CSS (i.e., without using JavaScript)?

3
  • 21
    :active works while the mouse is down. Depending on what you're trying to do, you may be able to make it work using the CSS4 pseudo-class :target.
    – bfavaretto
    Commented Nov 29, 2012 at 16:31
  • 4
    :target is not new to Selectors 4. It has been available since Selectors 3, which was already a recommendation for a year at the time of writing.
    – BoltClock
    Commented Sep 22, 2015 at 16:12
  • you will need to provide the interaction for other means of input as well, say touch, keyboard, joystick, voice control.
    – Andy
    Commented Jul 13, 2022 at 12:00

14 Answers 14

592
+500

The best way (actually the only way*) to simulate an actual click event using only CSS (rather than just hovering on an element or making an element active, where you don't have mouseUp) is to use the checkbox hack. It works by attaching a label to an <input type="checkbox"> element via the label's for="" attribute.

This feature has broad browser support (the :checked pseudo-class is IE9+).

Apply the same value to an <input>'s ID attribute and an accompanying <label>'s for="" attribute, and you can tell the browser to re-style the label on click with the :checked pseudo-class, thanks to the fact that clicking a label will check and uncheck the "associated" <input type="checkbox">.

* You can simulate a "selected" event via the :active or :focus pseudo-class in IE7+ (e.g. for a button that's normally 50px wide, you can change its width while active: #btnControl:active { width: 75px; }), but those are not true "click" events. They are "live" the entire time the element is selected (such as by Tabbing with your keyboard), which is a little different from a true click event, which fires an action on - typically - mouseUp.


Basic demo of the checkbox hack (the basic code structure for what you're asking):

label {
    display: block;
    background: lightgrey;
    width: 100px;
    height: 100px;
}

#demo:checked + label {
    background: blue;
    color: white;
}
<input type="checkbox" id="demo"/>
<label for="demo">I'm a square. Click me.</label>

Here I've positioned the label right after the input in my markup. This is so that I can use the adjacent sibling selector (the + key) to select only the label that immediately follows my #demo checkbox. Since the :checked pseudo-class applies to the checkbox, #demo:checked + label will only apply when the checkbox is checked.

Demo for re-sizing an image on click, which is what you're asking:

#btnControl {
    display: none;
}

#btnControl:checked + label > img {
    width: 70px;
    height: 74px;
}
<input type="checkbox" id="btnControl"/>
<label class="btn" for="btnControl"><img src="https://placekitten.com/200/300" id="btnLeft" /></label>

With that being said, there is some bad news. Because a label can only be associated with one form control at a time, that means you can't just drop a button inside the <label></label> tags and call it a day. However, we can use some CSS to make the label look and behave fairly close to how an HTML button looks and behaves.

Demo for imitating a button click effect, above and beyond what you're asking:

#btnControl {
    display: none;
}

.btn {
    width: 60px;
    height: 20px;
    background: silver;
    border-radius: 5px;
    padding: 1px 3px;
    box-shadow: 1px 1px 1px #000;
    display: block;
    text-align: center;
    background-image: linear-gradient(to bottom, #f4f5f5, #dfdddd);
    font-family: arial;
    font-size: 12px;
    line-height:20px;
}

.btn:hover {
    background-image: linear-gradient(to bottom, #c3e3fa, #a5defb);
}


.btn:active {
    margin-left: 1px 1px 0;
    box-shadow: -1px -1px 1px #000;
    outline: 1px solid black;
    background-image: linear-gradient(to top, #f4f5f5, #dfdddd);
}

#btnControl:checked + label {
    width: 70px;
    height: 74px;
    line-height: 74px;
}
<input type="checkbox" id="btnControl"/>
<label class="btn" for="btnControl">Click me!</label>

Most of the CSS in this demo is just for styling the label element. If you don't actually need a button, and any old element will suffice, then you can remove almost all of the styles in this demo, similar to my second demo above.

25
  • 2
    Awesome! But is there a way to revert the changes also when clicking somewhere else than on the input/image/button? I used your example to create a popup field and I want it to disappear when visitors click on the blank page. Thanks!
    – mxmehl
    Commented Apr 19, 2017 at 21:45
  • 1
    @mxmehl If you want them to click in a specific spot, you could do it with another adjacent sibling element, probably. However, if you want it to revert just by clicking anywhere on the screen that is blank, you're probably going to need JavaScript event listeners. Remember, this is a hack and is not the "best" way to create an "interactive" experience; that's what JS is for. This is just how to do it if you're restricted to using only CSS. :-)
    – TylerH
    Commented Apr 20, 2017 at 15:24
  • 1
    @MuhammadSaqib Yes, it should work on any mobile browser that supports :checked.
    – TylerH
    Commented Jun 10, 2018 at 3:32
  • 1
    I wouldn't advise an implementation like this for accessibility reasons. I guess you could get around most of the accessibility problems with this using aria but aria should be a last resort. You should instead use HTML elements when their semantics fit the use-case. Commented Sep 13, 2018 at 14:25
  • 1
    @Fla :target doesn't simulate an onclick event, just a focus event. You can't undo it, for example.
    – TylerH
    Commented Aug 23, 2019 at 17:35
489

The closest you'll get is :active:

#btnLeft:active {
    width: 70px;
    height: 74px;
}

However this will only apply the style when the mouse button is held down. The only way to apply a style and keep it applied onclick is to use a bit of JavaScript.

7
  • @Sparky672, Pretty much everything: caniuse.com/#feat=css-sel2 (IE7 supports :active too but is not listed because it does not support some of the other selectors)
    – jonvuri
    Commented Nov 29, 2012 at 16:43
  • @Kiyura, I guess everything, except some bugs in IE 8 and above.
    – Sparky
    Commented Nov 29, 2012 at 16:46
  • 22
    This answer is outdated. See TylerH's answer for a CSS-only solution to this. Commented Sep 22, 2015 at 16:27
  • 3
    @MaximillianLaumeister CSS only? One needs to add an input and a label. Commented Dec 24, 2021 at 3:48
  • 1
    @MaximillianLaumeister That answer is definitely not CSS only; it requires modifying HTML.
    – Kröw
    Commented Apr 17, 2023 at 3:25
98

You can use the pseudo class :target to mimic the on click event. Let me give you an example.

#something {
  display: none;
}

#something:target {
  display: block;
}
<a href="#something">Show</a>
<div id="something">Bingo!</div>

Here's how it looks like: http://jsfiddle.net/TYhnb/

One thing to note is this is only limited to hyperlink, so if you need to use on another than a hyperlink, such as a button, you might want to hack it a little bit, such as styling a hyperlink to look like a button.

3
  • 21
    How do we reverse the action?
    – Ansyori
    Commented Dec 10, 2013 at 4:42
  • 1
    I thought you couldn't target something that wasn't displayed.
    – Hazior
    Commented Aug 18, 2017 at 6:51
  • @Hazior That may be so in some cases, but if display:none is discouraged or prevented, one can try opacity:0.
    – Joe Rhoney
    Commented Jan 23 at 19:39
69

If you give the element a tabindex then you can use the :focus pseudo class to simulate a click.

#btnLeft:focus {
  width: 70px;
  height: 74px;
}
<img id="btnLeft" tabindex="0" src="https://picsum.photos/200"/>

3
  • 7
    this works reasonably well! when you use tabindex=-1 the item is still focusable, but only by mouse, not keyboard, which is better in this case. you can also use an outline:0 style to remove the blue border when focused Commented Feb 28, 2018 at 10:33
  • 2
    By far the easiest way to achieve this. +1
    – Joe Moore
    Commented Aug 25, 2022 at 9:29
  • this is works for me, I tried using :active and :hover for custom dropdown and while using @TylerH answer can help, but if you doesn't want to add any html you can use this solution instead Commented May 4, 2023 at 7:40
36

The following is for an onclick similar to JavaScript's onclick, not the :active pseudo class.

This can only be achieved with either JavaScript or the Checkbox Hack.

The checkbox hack essentially gets you to click on a label, that "checks" a checkbox, allowing you to style the label as you wish.

The demo.

Answered before OP clarified what he wanted.

1
  • 1
    You can also include your input inside the label so you don't have to use id attributes to bind them together.
    – stackular
    Commented Nov 25, 2014 at 12:58
26

Use a pure CSS solution without being (that) hacky.

Enter image description here

.page {
  position: fixed;
  top: 0;
  bottom: 0;
  right: 0;
  left: 0;
  background-color: #121519;
  color: whitesmoke;
}

.controls {
  display: flex;
  align-items: center;
  justify-content: center;
  height: 100%;
  width: 100%;
}

.arrow {
  cursor: pointer;
  transition: filter 0.3s ease 0.3s;
}

.arrow:active {
  filter: drop-shadow(0 0 0 steelblue);
  transition: filter 0s;
}
<body class="page">
  <div class="controls">
    <div class="arrow">
      <img src="https://i.imgur.com/JGUoNfS.png" />
    </div>
  </div>
</body>

TylerH has a great response, but it’s a pretty complex solution. I have a solution for those of you that just want a simple "onclick" effect with pure CSS without a bunch of extra elements.

We will simply use CSS transitions. You could probably do similar with animations.

The trick is to change the delay for the transition so that it will last when the user clicks.

.arrowDownContainer:active,
.arrowDownContainer.clicked {
  filter: drop-shadow(0px 0px 0px steelblue);
  transition: filter 0s;
}

Here I add the "clicked" class as well, so that JavaScript can also provide the effect if it needs to. I use a zero pixel drop-shadow filter, because it will highlight the given transparent graphic blue this way for my case.

I have a filter at 0s here, so that it won’t take effect. When the effect is released, I can then add the transition with a delay, so that it will provide a nice "clicked" effect.

.arrowDownContainer {
  cursor: pointer;
  position: absolute;
  bottom: 0px;
  top: 490px;
  left: 108px;
  height: 222px;
  width: 495px;
  z-index: 3;
  transition: filter 0.3s ease 0.3s;
}

This allows me to set it up so that when the user clicks the button, it highlights blue then fades out slowly (you could, of course, use other effects as well).

While you are limited here in the sense that the animation to highlight is instant, it does still provide the desired effect. You could likely use this trick with animation to produce a smoother overall transition.

Enter image description here

Enter image description here

2
  • FWIW the complexity is what's necessary to institute a persistent click effect. If you just want to do something temporarily that doesn't retain its state, this or many other solutions are fine and I agree definitely less complex.
    – TylerH
    Commented May 21, 2019 at 20:18
  • Agreed. All in what you need the end result to be and always good to know all the options. This is a great thread for those for sure. Probably worth a whole medium article going over each and the benefits of them each! Commented Aug 25, 2019 at 20:01
22

TylerH made a really good answer, and I just had to give that last button a visual update.

.btn {
    border-radius: 5px;
    padding: 10px 30px;
    box-shadow: 1px 1px 1px #000;
    background-image: linear-gradient(to bottom, #eee, #ddd);
}

.btn:hover {
    background-image: linear-gradient(to top, #adf, #8bf);
}

.btn:active {
    margin: 1px 1px 0;
    box-shadow: -1px -1px 1px #000;
}

#btnControl {
    display: block;
    visibility: hidden;
}
<input type="checkbox" id="btnControl"/>
<label class="btn" for="btnControl">Click me!</label>

1
  • Nice :active styles; what I was going for, but was a bit rushed when building out the look of them.
    – TylerH
    Commented Mar 18, 2016 at 19:52
12

Warning! Particularly simple answer below! :)

You actually can have a change that persists (such as a block/popup that appears and stays visible after a click) with only CSS (and without using the checkbox hack) despite what many of the (otherwise correct) answers here claim, as long as you only need persistence during the hover.

So take a look at Bojangles' and TylerH's answers if those work for you, but if you want a simple and CSS-only answer that will keep a block visible after being clicked on (and even can have the block disappear with a follow-up click), then see this solution.

I had a similar situation. I needed a popup div with onClick where I couldn't add any JavaScript or change the markup/HTML (a true CSS solution) and this is possible with some caveats. You can't use the :target trick that can create a nice popup unless you can change the HTML (to add an 'id'), so that was out.

In my case, the popup div was contained inside the other div, and I wanted the popup to appear on top of the other div, and this can be done using a combination of :active and :hover:

/* Outer div - needs to be relative so we can use absolute positioning */
.clickToShowInfo {
    position: relative;
}
/* When clicking outer div, make inner div visible */
.clickToShowInfo:active .info { display: block; }
/* And hold by staying visible on hover */
.info:hover {
    display: block;
}
/* General settings for popup */
.info {
    position: absolute;
    top: -5;
    display: none;
    z-index: 100;
    background-color: white;
    width: 200px;
    height: 200px;
}

Example (as well as one that allows clicking on the popup to make it disappear) at:

CSS-Only onClick to Popup Div (no Javascript or HTML changes!)

I've also inserted a code snippet example below, but the positioning in the Stack Overflow sandbox is weird, so I had to put the 'click here' text after the innerDiv, which isn't normally needed.

/* Outer div - needs to be relative so we can use absolute positioning */
    .clickToShowInfo {
        position: relative;
    }
    /* When clicking outer div, make inner div visible */
    .clickToShowInfo:active .info { visibility: visible; }
    /* And hold by staying visible on hover */
    .info:hover {
        visibility: visible;
    }
    /* General settings for popup */
    .info {
        position: absolute;
        top: -10;
        visibility: hidden;
        z-index: 100;
        background-color: white;
        box-shadow: 5px 5px 2px #aaa;
        border: 1px solid grey;
        padding: 8px;
        width: 220px;
        height: 200px;
    }
    /* If we want clicking on the popup to close, use this */
    .info:active {
        visibility: hidden;    /* Doesn't work because DCEvent is :active as well */
        height: 0px;
        width: 0px;
        left: -1000px;
        top: -1000px;
    }
<p />
<div class="clickToShowInfo">
    <div class="info">
        Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua
    </div>
    Click here to show info
</div>
<p />

1
  • 3
    (re: our comment discussion earlier) The info div does not stay visible past mouseUp on Firefox. While it does stay visible past mouseUp in other browsers (IE, Edge, Chrome), it doesn't persist when the mouse is moved out of the box in any other browser, thus preventing it from being considered a real 'onclick' event (e.g. a persistent change).
    – TylerH
    Commented Sep 19, 2019 at 16:43
8

Firstly I will use focus

The reason for this is that it works nicely for the example I'm showing. If someone wants a mouse down type event then use active.

The HTML code:

<button class="mdT mdI1" ></button>
<button class="mdT mdI2" ></button>
<button class="mdT mdI3" ></button>
<button class="mdT mdI4" ></button>

The CSS code

/* Change *button size, border, bg color, and align to middle* */
    .mdT {
        width: 96px;
        height: 96px;
        border: 0px;
        outline: 0;
        vertical-align: middle;
        background-color: #AAAAAA;
    }
    .mdT:focus {
        width: 256px;
        height: 256px;
    }

/* Change Images Depending On Focus */
    .mdI1       { background-image: url('http://placehold.it/96x96/AAAAAA&text=img1');     }
    .mdI1:focus { background-image: url('http://placehold.it/256x256/555555&text=Image+1');   }
    .mdI2       { background-image: url('http://placehold.it/96x96/AAAAAA&text=img2');     }
    .mdI2:focus { background-image: url('http://placehold.it/256x256/555555&text=Image+2');   }
    .mdI3       { background-image: url('http://placehold.it/96x96/AAAAAA&text=img3');     }
    .mdI3:focus { background-image: url('http://placehold.it/256x256/555555&text=Image+3');   }
    .mdI4       { background-image: url('http://placehold.it/96x96/AAAAAA&text=img4');     }
    .mdI4:focus { background-image: url('http://placehold.it/256x256/555555&text=Image+4');   }

JSFiddle link: http://jsfiddle.net/00wwkjux/

The OP only wants the effect to last during the click event. Now while this is not exact for that need, it’s close. active will animate while the mouse is down and any changes that you need to have to last longer need to be done with JavaScript.

2
  • 1
    For anyone reading, anyway to make it toggle? Or is that asking too much out of css lol?
    – DardanM
    Commented Jun 10, 2015 at 7:18
  • As far as i know, the focus/active/hover is about as close as you can get with css.. You might be able to do something fancy with a option/select type of code.. But have not tried/needed that yet
    – Angry 84
    Commented Jun 10, 2015 at 9:47
4

I had a problem with an element which had to be colored red on hover and be blue on click while being hovered. To achieve this with CSS you need for example:

h1:hover { color: red; }
h1:active { color: blue; }
<h1>This is a heading.</h1>

I struggled for some time until I discovered that the order of CSS selectors was the problem I was having. The problem was that I switched the places and the active selector was not working. Then I found out that :hover to go first and then :active.

2

I have the below code for mouse hover and mouse click and it works:

//For Mouse Hover
.thumbnail:hover span{ /* CSS for enlarged image */
    visibility: visible;
    text-align: center;
    vertical-align: middle;
    height: 70%;
    width: 80%;
    top: auto;
    left: 10%;
}

And this code hides the image when you click on it:

.thumbnail:active span {
    visibility: hidden;
}
2

If for some reason you can't use JavaScript, the following workaround is your best bet to create a toggle button. The <details> HTML element creates a disclosure widget to hide and show content. We're going to (ab)use the <details> element and some CSS, so let's call it the "details hack".

How it works

Here's a basic example.

details[open] summary {
  color: red;
}
<details>
  <summary>Toggle</summary>
</details>

Clicking the <summary> element toggles the <details>' open attribute and the <summary>'s style. You can also toggle the style of the <details>' next siblings.

details[open] summary {
  color: red;
}

details[open] ~ p {
  color: blue;
}
<details>
  <summary>Toggle</summary>
</details>
<p>Hello, world!</p>

An advantage of this method over the checkbox hack is that the button is keyboard accessible.

Notes

  • The <summary>'s contents can be any heading content, plain text, or HTML that can be used within a paragraph.
  • The <summary>'s display default value is list-item. To remove the list item's triangle ::marker, change the value to inline-flex, for example.
summary {
  display: inline-flex;
}

Alternatively, you may use one of the following rules:

summary {
  list-style: none;
}
summary::marker {
  content: none;
}

The answer to the OP's question

summary {
  display: inline-flex;
}

details[open] img {
  width: 75px;
  height: 75px;
}
<details>
  <summary><img src="https://i.sstatic.net/5FBwB.png" alt="Heart"></summary>
</details>

See the source for more examples: Create a CSS toggle button with the <details> element

-1

Depending on what you want to do, letting the focus maintain the change could be an option?

<button></button>

<style>
  button {
    width: 140px;
    height: 70px;
    background: url('http://www.ranklogos.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/Stack-Overflow-Logo.png');
    background-size: cover;
  }
      
  button:focus {
    width: 240px;
    height: 120px;
  }
</style>

https://jsfiddle.net/anm92d0r/

Note this doesnt work with the image tag. But judging by your element id, I'm assuming you're are looking for button functinality.

-4

You can use :target.

Or to filter by class name, use .classname:target.

Or filter by id name using #idname:target.

#id01:target {
    position: absolute;
    left: 0;
    top: 0;
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    display: flex;
    align-items: center;
    justify-content: center;
}

.msg {
    display: none;
}

.close {
    color: white;
    width: 2rem;
    height: 2rem;
    background-color: black;
    text-align: center;
    margin: 20px;
}
<a href="#id01">Open</a>

<div id="id01" class="msg">
    <a href="" class="close">&times;</a>
    <p>Some text. Some text. Some text.</p>
    <p>Some text. Some text. Some text.</p>
</div>

2
  • 3
    An answer showing how to use :target is already posted, so no need for one more. Furthermore, the questioner ask for how to have an "onclick" effect, not show/hide other elements.
    – Asons
    Commented Mar 27, 2019 at 17:27
  • This is more of an "onload" than "onclick" effect, as well.
    – TylerH
    Commented Mar 27, 2019 at 21:35

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