26

I am unable to get rid of this state in which my repo is seem to be locked in. After a doing a reset to HEAD~1, I keep getting this notification about this single file being modified. 'add' and 'checkout' have not affect. I have core.autocrlf and core.safecrlf unset (empty).

Please see below:

$ git --version
git version 1.7.9.6 (Apple Git-31.1)

$ git status

# Changes not staged for commit:
#   (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#   (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
#
#       modified:   a_file_name.cpp

The followings commands (ran individually) have no affect:

$ git checkout -- a_file_name.cpp
$ git reset a_file_name.cpp
$ git add a_file_name.cpp
$ git reset --hard
$ git clean -n
<nothing>
$ git clean -f
<nothing>

$ git status

# Changes not staged for commit:
#   (use "git add <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#   (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
#
#       modified:   a_file_name.cpp

and it goes on ...

What did I do wrong?

Response to @Don's suggestion below (git rm), no change, but here is how it goes:

$ git rm 
error: 'a_file_name.cpp' has local modifications
(use --cached to keep the file, or -f to force removal)
$ git rm -f a_file_name.cpp
rm 'a_file_name.cpp'
$ git status

# Changes to be committed:
#   (use "git reset HEAD <file>..." to unstage)
#
#       deleted:    a_file_name.cpp
#
# Changes not staged for commit:
#   (use "git add/rm <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#   (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
#
#       deleted:    a_file_name.cpp
#

$ git commit -m"tmp"
[master 2a9e054] tmp
1 file changed, 174 deletions(-)
delete mode 100644 a_file_name.cpp

$ git status
# Your branch is ahead of 'origin/master' by 1 commit.
#
# Changes not staged for commit:
#   (use "git add/rm <file>..." to update what will be committed)
#   (use "git checkout -- <file>..." to discard changes in working directory)
#
#       deleted:    a_file_name.cpp
#

Pretty much back to sq.1

19
  • 1
    What are your line ending settings (autocrlf, safecrlf, .gitattributes, etc.)?
    – ellotheth
    Nov 29, 2012 at 17:15
  • have you tried just git --stash and just stash all your changes? Nov 29, 2012 at 17:21
  • 1
    What happens when you do git checkout -- a_file_name.cpp? Also be sure you are in the same directory as the file when you run this. Nov 29, 2012 at 18:38
  • 2
    @FractalSpace: It makes it hard to answer your question if what looks like commands and output are actually faked and missing crucial details.
    – CB Bailey
    Nov 29, 2012 at 21:05
  • 2
    @FractalSpace: In that case, if you weren't in the correct directory, I don't understand why git status didn't give you the correct relative path, e.g. # modified: sub-dir/a_file_name.cpp. If you can reproduce this then you should log a bug. Git definitely shouldn't do this.
    – CB Bailey
    Nov 29, 2012 at 21:10

5 Answers 5

7
git commit -a -m "message"

The -a option will add all tracked files with modifications

6

A round about way that worked for me, is to:

  1. recreate the file that I deleted.

  2. git add path/filename

  3. git rm --cached path/filename

  4. delete the file

  5. git add .

  6. git commit --amend # if not on an already pushed branch.

1
  • Yeah this worked for me, made a merge and there was a file with the same name, so one was prefixed with ~HEAD. I deleted it manually and commited the merge. Then there was a phantom file that I could not add nor delete... Also realised the unstaged file had no uppercase but my file on disk had uppercase... Jul 12, 2018 at 10:56
2

Be sure that you are in the same directory as the file when you run any git commands. Alternatively, you can use a relative or absolute path for files used with git commands. The output from git status should indicate the subdirectory where the file is located. I find it strange that the output you posted here doesn't show that.

2
  • I found it more helpful to run the commands not from the same directory, but from the git project's top-level directory Apr 20, 2019 at 15:18
  • @JosiahYoder Yes, you can do that as well. Apr 21, 2019 at 18:54
2

Do you need any of the changes in the modified file? git-reset by default leaves the files in the directory tree.

git reset --hard

will reset and write over the files in your working tree with the files in the commit.

Have you done a git diff after each of the steps to see if any changes actually exist?

6
  • 3
    git reset --hard has no affect. (at this point, I don't need this file) The diff does show some changes. Nov 29, 2012 at 18:06
  • You can either delete the unwanted files, or git add . before git reset --hard to every untracked file permanently. Nov 29, 2012 at 18:35
  • Do you have a permissions issue? Does the file ever change after any checkout, reset, etc?
    – jeremy
    Nov 29, 2012 at 18:41
  • @jeremy git fsck did show some dangling object, did git gc. However, no change. Nov 29, 2012 at 20:31
  • @FractalSpace git rm won't help, since it's not a tracked file. Nov 29, 2012 at 20:40
1

this could happen if the file in question has a different capitalization.

in my case it was

README.md readme.md

git won't let you simple git add ... a case change.

you can fix that by doing something like

git mv -f readme.md README.md

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