68

How do I, in a shell script, create a file called foo.conf and make it contain:

NameVirtualHost 127.0.0.1

# Default
<VirtualHost 127.0.0.1>
ServerName localhost
DocumentRoot "C:/wamp/www"
</VirtualHost>
117

Use a "here document":

cat > foo.conf << EOF
NameVirtualHost 127.0.0.1

# Default
<VirtualHost 127.0.0.1>
ServerName localhost
DocumentRoot "C:/wamp/www"
</VirtualHost>
EOF
3
  • 1
    @ams Can one have variables that get interpreted within the document? – Ellery Familia Jan 10 '16 at 16:10
  • Yes. How it's interpreted depends on what quotes you put around the EOF. – ams Jan 10 '16 at 17:43
  • 2
    For those using it inside an indented code section, the text and the final EOF should not be indented and be at the beginning of the line. – Sputnik Oct 31 '17 at 10:50
23

You can do that with echo:

echo 'NameVirtualHost 127.0.0.1

# Default
<VirtualHost 127.0.0.1>
ServerName localhost
DocumentRoot "C:/wamp/www"
</VirtualHost>' > foo.conf

Everything enclosed by single quotes are interpreted as literals, so you just write that block into a file called foo.conf. If it doesn't exist, it will be created. If it does exist, it will be overwritten.

2
  • 3
    This works, but is limited by the maximum command line length. – ams Nov 29 '12 at 20:04
  • 3
    Also it only works as long as you don't have apostrophes in the document. – mornfall Dec 15 '13 at 10:50
7

a heredoc might be the simplest way:

cat <<END >foo.conf
NameVirtualHost 127.0.0.1

# Default
<VirtualHost 127.0.0.1>
ServerName localhost
DocumentRoot "C:/wamp/www"
</VirtualHost>
END
5

This code fitted best for me:

sudo dd of=foo.conf << EOF
<VirtualHost *:80>
  ServerName localhost
  DocumentRoot /var/www/localhost
</VirtualHost>
EOF

It was the only one I could use with sudo out of the box!

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