84

This question already has an answer here:

I'm using this PHP code to get a visitor's IP address:

<?php echo $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR']; ?>

But, I can't get the real IP address from visitors when they are using a proxy. Is there any way to get a visitor's IP address in this case?

marked as duplicate by Martijn Pieters Apr 7 '18 at 17:57

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

156

Try this php code.

<?PHP

function getUserIP()
{
    // Get real visitor IP behind CloudFlare network
    if (isset($_SERVER["HTTP_CF_CONNECTING_IP"])) {
              $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'] = $_SERVER["HTTP_CF_CONNECTING_IP"];
              $_SERVER['HTTP_CLIENT_IP'] = $_SERVER["HTTP_CF_CONNECTING_IP"];
    }
    $client  = @$_SERVER['HTTP_CLIENT_IP'];
    $forward = @$_SERVER['HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR'];
    $remote  = $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'];

    if(filter_var($client, FILTER_VALIDATE_IP))
    {
        $ip = $client;
    }
    elseif(filter_var($forward, FILTER_VALIDATE_IP))
    {
        $ip = $forward;
    }
    else
    {
        $ip = $remote;
    }

    return $ip;
}


$user_ip = getUserIP();

echo $user_ip; // Output IP address [Ex: 177.87.193.134]


?>
  • 4
    You should also handle the case where there are multiple proxies involved, why not? – Esailija Nov 30 '12 at 14:07
  • 22
    This is bad as HTTP_CLIENT_IP and HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR can be forged. Only REMOTE_ADDR cannot. – Pekka 웃 Jul 29 '13 at 15:43
  • I can believe this, I have beeen looking through all internet for this for the last 30 minutes. I think it would be something easier to find :S – Gman Jan 11 '14 at 1:43
  • 2
    @Pradeep Kumar Prabaharan, yes you do. If you run this code on a local server, you'll get your local ip, which is 127.0.0.1 or ::1 – itd Dec 13 '15 at 15:35
  • 2
    HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR can have multiple ip like '1.1.1.1,2.2.2.2' and this functions don't handle it. read en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X-Forwarded-For – Ehsan Chavoshi May 2 '17 at 14:44
40

This is the most common technique I've seen:

function getUserIP() {
    if( array_key_exists('HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR', $_SERVER) && !empty($_SERVER['HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR']) ) {
        if (strpos($_SERVER['HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR'], ',')>0) {
            $addr = explode(",",$_SERVER['HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR']);
            return trim($addr[0]);
        } else {
            return $_SERVER['HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR'];
        }
    }
    else {
        return $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'];
    }
}

Note that it does not guarantee it you will get always the correct user IP because there are many ways to hide it.

  • 1
    Upvoted. This is one of the few solutions that properly handles the HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR header, which may contain a comma-separated list if the request passed through one or more proxies (according to en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X-Forwarded-For#Format) – Sean the Bean Mar 14 '18 at 13:38
  • Since it's possible to spoof the HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR header, it's a good idea to test it with filter_var(trim($addr), FILTER_VALIDATE_IP) to make sure you at least have a valid IP address before returning it. – Sean the Bean Mar 14 '18 at 13:52
  • This is the best solution of this thread. Thanks mate – Rahul May 28 '18 at 15:39
  • Does this go in functions.php or wp-config.php? – Garconis Apr 6 at 18:24
  • @Garconis no one haven't mentioned WordPress here – Teneff Apr 6 at 19:12
19

This is my approach:

 function getRealUserIp(){
    switch(true){
      case (!empty($_SERVER['HTTP_X_REAL_IP'])) : return $_SERVER['HTTP_X_REAL_IP'];
      case (!empty($_SERVER['HTTP_CLIENT_IP'])) : return $_SERVER['HTTP_CLIENT_IP'];
      case (!empty($_SERVER['HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR'])) : return $_SERVER['HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR'];
      default : return $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'];
    }
 }

How to use:

$ip = getRealUserIp();
  • 15
    This is a very strange and confusing use of a switch statement. codethinked.com/dont-be-clever – Andrew Ensley Jun 10 '16 at 20:46
  • 7
    What do you consider confusing exactly? For me, it is quite clear! – El cero Jun 16 '16 at 18:32
  • 4
    It's confusing because this is exactly what if/elseif is meant to be used for. – Andy Dec 19 '16 at 15:32
  • 4
    If you ever find yourself using switch(true), stop, and use an if statement(s). How can this possibly be considered clearer than the accepted if/else? – DJ Far Jan 24 '17 at 2:46
  • I think the advantage (?) of a switch statement here is the way it's pre-processed in most languages to be run as a jump table and, in cases of large data or frequent use, can save on processing. However if it's not going to be run at a high frequency, clarity should not be sacrificed for processing speed. – Xandor Apr 10 at 0:43
7

Proxies may send a HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR header but even that is optional.

Also keep in mind that visitors may share IP addresses; University networks, large companies and third-world/low-budget ISPs tend to share IPs over many users.

  • 1
    The header "specification" can handle multiple proxies, the chain of ips will be comma separated in the header value – Esailija Nov 30 '12 at 14:00
  • Just one note. Third world ISP does opposite. They create dynamic ip for each login. So its multiple ips per user and not one ip for multiple user. – itachi Nov 30 '12 at 14:15
5

apply this code for get the ipaddress:

    if (getenv('HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR')) { $pipaddress = getenv('HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR');
 $ipaddress = getenv('REMOTE_ADDR'); 
    echo "Your Proxy IP address is : ".$pipaddress. "(via $ipaddress)" ; } 
    else { $ipaddress = getenv('REMOTE_ADDR'); echo "Your IP address is : $ipaddress"; }
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
4

This is my function.

benefits :

  • Work if $_SERVER was not available.
  • Filter private and/or reserved IPs;
  • Process all forwarded IPs in X_FORWARDED_FOR
  • Compatible with CloudFlare
  • Can set a default if no valid IP found!
  • Short & Simple !

/**
 * Get real user ip
 *
 * Usage sample:
 * GetRealUserIp();
 * GetRealUserIp('ERROR',FILTER_FLAG_NO_RES_RANGE);
 * 
 * @param string $default default return value if no valid ip found
 * @param int    $filter_options filter options. default is FILTER_FLAG_NO_PRIV_RANGE | FILTER_FLAG_NO_RES_RANGE
 *
 * @return string real user ip
 */

function GetRealUserIp($default = NULL, $filter_options = 12582912) {
    $HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR = isset($_SERVER)? $_SERVER["HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR"]:getenv('HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR');
    $HTTP_CLIENT_IP = isset($_SERVER)?$_SERVER["HTTP_CLIENT_IP"]:getenv('HTTP_CLIENT_IP');
    $HTTP_CF_CONNECTING_IP = isset($_SERVER)?$_SERVER["HTTP_CF_CONNECTING_IP"]:getenv('HTTP_CF_CONNECTING_IP');
    $REMOTE_ADDR = isset($_SERVER)?$_SERVER["REMOTE_ADDR"]:getenv('REMOTE_ADDR');

    $all_ips = explode(",", "$HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR,$HTTP_CLIENT_IP,$HTTP_CF_CONNECTING_IP,$REMOTE_ADDR");
    foreach ($all_ips as $ip) {
        if ($ip = filter_var($ip, FILTER_VALIDATE_IP, $filter_options))
            break;
    }
    return $ip?$ip:$default;
}
1

If the Proxy is which you trust, you can try: (Assume the Proxy IP is 151.101.2.10)

<?php

$trustProxyIPs = ['151.101.2.10'];

$clientIP  = isset($_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR']) ? $_SERVER['REMOTE_ADDR'] : NULL;

if (in_array($clientIP, $trustProxyIPs)) {

    $headers = ['HTTP_CLIENT_IP', 'HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR'];

    foreach ($headers as $key => $header) {

        if (isset($_SERVER[$header]) && filter_var($_SERVER[$header], FILTER_VALIDATE_IP)) {

            $clientIP = $_SERVER[$header];

            break;
        }
    }
}

echo $clientIP;

This will prevent forged forward header by direct requested clients, and get real IP via trusted Proxies.

0

Yes, $_SERVER["HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR"] is how I see my ip when under a proxy on my nginx server.

But your best bet is to run phpinfo() on a page requested from under a proxy so you can look at all the availabe variables and see what is the one that carries your real ip.

-2

This works for Windows and Linux! It doesn't matter if it's localhost or online..

    function getIP() {
    $ip = $_SERVER['SERVER_ADDR'];

    if (PHP_OS == 'WINNT'){
        $ip = getHostByName(getHostName());
    }

    if (PHP_OS == 'Linux'){
        $command="/sbin/ifconfig";
        exec($command, $output);
        // var_dump($output);
        $pattern = '/inet addr:?([^ ]+)/';

        $ip = array();
        foreach ($output as $key => $subject) {
            $result = preg_match_all($pattern, $subject, $subpattern);
            if ($result == 1) {
                if ($subpattern[1][0] != "127.0.0.1")
                $ip = $subpattern[1][0];
            }
        //var_dump($subpattern);
        }
    }
    return $ip;
}
  • That doesn't work every time because there are more OS than Win and Linux. Chek this: stackoverflow.com/a/738893/2127296 – Iván Rodríguez Torres Feb 12 '16 at 13:27
  • 1
    You're right, the solution just work for linux and win. :) – Valcone Feb 12 '16 at 13:29
  • 7
    This returns the server's IP address. Not the visitor's. The question asked for the visitor's IP address. – Andrew Ensley Jun 10 '16 at 20:41
  • Downvoted because this returns the SERVER's IP address, not the VISITOR's IP address. – S. Saad Feb 4 '17 at 2:07
  • 1
    Except the fact that as other said, it returns the server IP, while the question clearly is different, it uses exec() and is too complicated without a reason. Getting the visitor's IP does not require so much. Even if you use it to get the server IP, it should be 3 short lines of code to cover windows servers as well as linux. – durduvakis Jun 22 '17 at 9:31