3

A question from a book I have found.

Write a program that asks the user to input an integer and prints two integers, root and pwr, such that 0 < pwr < 6 and root**pwr is equal to the integer user entered. If no such pair exists, print that it is impossible to find such a pair.

integer = 3 #there will be raw_input but I use it as an example
root = 0

for pwr in range(1,6):

    if root**pwr != integer:
        pwr += 1
        print pwr

    else:
        print root, pwr

    if pwr > 5:     
        pwr = 1
        root += 1

I did not complete program yet because I cannot get loop right. The problem is that I receive output 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 and then loop terminates. However, I did use restart on pwr variable in the last if statement code block you see. However, it stops to execute anyway. What is the problem here?

1
  • amit, integer will be like integer = int(raw_input('Enter integer: ')); I don't know the integer user inputs. But I used it as an example. Take 3. I check rootpwr up to 6 and see that 0pwr is not equal to integer, because I cannot surpass 6, I reset pwr, add 1 to root and repeat... :] But loop fails.
    – Contempt
    Nov 30, 2012 at 15:36

30 Answers 30

5

As others have noted, this is the finger exercise for section 3.1 (on exhaustive enumeration) of Introduction to Computation and Programming Using Python by John Guttag, which is the textbook for the massive open online course MITx: 6.00.1x Introduction to Computer Science and Programming Using Python. The textbook and the course use Python 2.7.

I do not yet have a high enough reputation to comment on other answers, so allow me to preface my answer by saying that at the time I am posting this, all of the previously posted answers are incorrect or incomplete, as far as I can see. A common mistake in the other answers is that they do not consider all integers. A correct program should solve the problem for all integers, including positive integers and negative integers and zero (zero is also an integer).

Prior to this exercise in Guttag's book, we have been introduced to while loops but not for loops nor the range function, both of which are introduced in the next section. Here is my answer, using only the concepts that have been introduced in the book prior to this exercise:

num = int(raw_input("Enter an integer: "))
pwr = 1
root = 0
found = False
if num < 0:
    neg = True
else:
    neg = False
while pwr < 6:
    while abs(root**pwr) <= abs(num):
        if root**pwr == num:
            print(str(root) + "**" + str(pwr) + " = " + str(num))
            found = True
        if abs(root) > abs(num):
            root = 0
        elif neg:
            root -= 1
        else:
            root +=1
    pwr += 1
    root = 0
if not found:
    print("No pair of integers, 'root' and 'pwr', exists such that 0 < pwr < 6 and root**pwr = " + str(num))

I have tested this code with the integers 0, 1, -1, 2, -2, 8, -8, and some other integers, and it appears to work.

1
  • How can you be certain it works? How did you check your solution? for example if I input 8 the power and root should be 2, 3 respectively correct?
    – d0rf47
    May 10, 2020 at 16:48
2

Another option, with "simple math".

integer = 3

for power in range(1,6):
    a = (integer ** (1.0/power))
    if math.ceil(a) == a:
        print a, power

>> 3.0 1
2

In general, it's not a good idea to modify what you are looping over inside of the loop. There is no reason to fiddle with pwr when you are using it to iterate over range(1,6).

What your code is trying to do is test root ** pwr == integer for successive values of pwr and a fixed value of root until pwr reaches 6. Then you want it to add one to root and repeat. This is most naturally phrased as two nested for loops:

for root in range(0,integer):
    for pwr in range(1,6):
        if root ** pwr == integer:
            print root, pwr

In any case, this is a fairly expensive way to go about it and so I would recommend looking into some of the other solutions here. However, you should keep this in mind because it's a good example of how to use for loops.

To answer your question about why the loop was terminating you have to consider how python treats iterators. When the code block inside of a for loop terminates, python sets pwr to the value returned by the iterators next() method (which does exactly what you would think). When there are no more values left in the iterator next() will raise a StopIteration exception and Python will exit the loop. The key is that Python doesn't modify the value of pwr by adding 1 each iteration, it overwrites the value. So you loop will run exactly 5 times because that's how many items there are in range(1,6)

For clarification run the following code:

for i in range(0,9):
    print i
    i += 5
    print i
2
  • Yes I see high complexity algorithm here..certainly not the best way to work through a problem, if you want speed. :D But still, WHY after resetting pwr to 1, my loop stops executing? This is important to me and I cannot comprehend this. Could anyone explain?
    – Contempt
    Nov 30, 2012 at 16:17
  • Great, thank you a lot. :] It means I ran out of iterations in this loop, when it is achieved, the loop will terminate and modifications of iterable variable will not effect a loop.
    – Contempt
    Nov 30, 2012 at 16:41
1

integer ** 1 always suffices the condition.

An alternative (assuming you actually want 1 < pwr < 6):

Check if for a certain base a and a number n: ceil(a ** log_a(n)) == n. If so - then a ** log_a(n) is your answer.
Repeat for all possible a's in range.

(In here log_a(n) is the logarithm with the base a, which can be computed as log(n)/log(a))

2
  • I want to know why my loop does not continue to run! I used pwr = 1 and resetted the value. It now is in range 1 to 6 and thus must run. But it doesn't. I understood the math you've shown here but I read MIT's book and want to gradually build the foundation with simpler maths at the moment. Thank you.
    – Contempt
    Nov 30, 2012 at 15:39
  • You don't need logorithms for this. root**pow == integer iff root == integer**(1.0/pow). That solution is an integer if root == int(root). Assuming 1 < pow < 6, just trying 2-5 will give you the solution.
    – agf
    Nov 30, 2012 at 16:04
1

As others have mentioned, this is a finger exercise from Introduction to Computation and Programm Using Python by John Guttag.

While some of the above responses may work (to be honest, I haven't tested), a simpler approach will produce the desired results as well as accommodate negative integers, e.g.:

x = int(input("Enter an integer: "))
root = 0

while root < abs(x):
    root += 1
    for pwr in range(1,6):
        if root ** pwr == abs(x):
            if x < 0:
                print(-root, "to the power of", pwr, "=", x)
            else:
                print(root, "to the power of", pwr, "=", x)
1

I had a logical error, while trying to figure out what it might be, I wasted a lot of time, and I think this might be a common mistake. I forgot to reset the value of pwr in the outer loop.

Here is the current version:

root=0
pwr=1
check=0
integer=int(input('Enter the number:'))
while(root**pwr<abs(integer)):
    while(pwr<6):
        if root**pwr==abs(integer):
            check=1
            print('Root =',root,'or -'+ str(root),'and Power =',pwr)
        pwr+=1
    root+=1
    pwr=1    #<--------------Resetting pwr to 1 inside the outer loop
if check!=1:
    print('No such combination exists')

I hope this helps in saving some time.

1

This is what I came up with. As was mentioned in a previous post, the range should have been 2-6 for the pwr because there will always be an answer for a integer to a pwr of one, and the exercise states that there will be integers where no such pair exists.

x = int(input('Enter an integer: '))
root = 0
pwr = 2
while pwr > 1 and pwr < 7:
    while root**pwr < x:
        root = root + 1
    if root**pwr == x:
        print(str(root) + '**' + str(pwr), '==', str(x))
        break
    else:
        root = 1
        pwr = pwr + 1
else:
    print('no such pair exists')
1
  • I was going to post my solution but this is more or less the same.
    – Ben Hall
    Jul 9, 2021 at 1:29
1

Long version answer that prints the decrementing function - use it only for small numbers

x = int(input('Enter an integer:'))

pwr = [1,2,3,4,5]
mypairs = []

for p in pwr:
    root = 0 
    while root**p < abs(x):
        print('Value of decrementing function abs(x) - root**p is',\
              abs(x)-root**p)
        root = root + 1
    if root**p == abs(x) and p%2 !=0:
        print('For the power %s there exists such a pair, shown in final list.'%p)

    if root**p != abs(x):
        print('For the power %s there does not exist any such pairs.'%p)
    else:
        if x < 0:
            if p%2 == 0 :
                print('For the power %s there does not exist any such pairs'%p)
            else:
                root = -root            
                mypairs.append([root,p])
        else:
            mypairs.append([root,p])
print(mypairs)

Faster answer without decrementing function

x = int(input('Enter an integer:'))

pwr = [1,2,3,4,5]
mypairs = []

for p in pwr:
    root = 0 
    while root**p < abs(x):
        root = root + 1
    if root**p != abs(x):
        print('For the power %s there does not exist any such pairs.'%p)
    else:
        if x < 0:
            if p%2 == 0 :
                print('For the power %s there does not exist any such pairs'%p)
            else:
                root = -root            
                mypairs.append([root,p])
        else:
            mypairs.append([root,p])
print(mypairs)
1

Here is my answer for finger exercise, I added another if statement after the inner loop and it works fine now for positive integers.

inum= int(input('Enter an integer '))
    root = 0
    pwr = 1
    found = 0
    
    while root**pwr < inum:
        
        while 0<pwr<6:
            
            if root**pwr == inum:
                found = 1
                
                print('The power is ',pwr,'& root is ',root)
                break
            else:
                found = 0
                pwr = pwr+1
        if root** pwr == inum:
            break
        else:
            root = root+1
            pwr = 1
               
    
    if found ==0:
        print('Power and root pair doesnot exist')
2
  • Here is how I did it. I added another if statement after the inner loop. Works fine now. Mar 22, 2022 at 6:01
  • 2
    Your answer could be improved with additional supporting information. Please edit to add further details, such as citations or documentation, so that others can confirm that your answer is correct. You can find more information on how to write good answers in the help center.
    – Community Bot
    Mar 22, 2022 at 6:53
0

This is the finger exercise from Chapter 3 of 'Introduction to Computation and Programming Using Python' by John Guttag and reads:

Write a program that asks the user to enter an integer and prints two integers, root and pwr, such that 0 < pwr < 6 and root**pwr is equal to the integer entered by the user. If no such pairs exists, it should print a message to that effect.

Given the author indicates that there may be no pairs that exist, I've assumed that the conditions for pwr should be 1 < pwr < 6 otherwise there will always be a solution (integer**1). My answer, using only the concepts that have been introduced in the book to that point, is:

num = int(raw_input('Enter a positive integer: '))
pwr = 2
root = 1
ans = ''
while pwr < 6:
    while root**pwr <= num:
        if root**pwr == num:       
            print 'the root is ',root,
            print 'the power is ', pwr
            ans = True
        root += 1        
    pwr += 1
    root = 1
if ans != True:
    print'No such pair of integers exist'
0

This is an answer based on the submission by archery1234. Thanks to archery1234 a I am so new to this I could not get started without the help. I liked the answer provided because it only used the concepts explained up to that point in the book so I felt it was close to what Dr. Guttag probably wanted us to learn (while loop within a while loop). The following code meets the condition that 0 < pwr < 6 without always just terminating at the integer entered as the root and pwr = 1.

integer = abs(int(raw_input("Enter an integer: ")))
pwr = 1
root = 2
ans = ' '
if abs(integer) == 1:
    print "No such pair of integers exists"
else:
    while root < abs(integer):
        while root**pwr <= integer:
            if root**pwr == integer:
                print "The root is ",root,";"
                print "The power is ",pwr,"."
                ans = True
            pwr += 1
        root += 1
        pwr = 1
    if ans != True:
        print "No such pair of integers exist"
0

First, if we enter an integer, e.g 1024, then we have 1024^1 = 1024. So there will always be a solution to the problem:

n = int(input('Enter an integer: '))
pwr = 1
root = 1
found = False

while root <= n:
    if root**pwr == n:
        print('root =',root, 'pwr =', pwr)
        found = True
    pwr = pwr + 1
    if pwr == 6:
        pwr = 1
        root = root + 1

if not found:
    print('No such pair exist.')
0

This is my answer:

usr = int(raw_input("Enter an integer > "))
paired = False
for pwr in range(1,6):
    root = 0
    while (usr - root**pwr > 0):
        root += 1
    if usr == root**pwr:
        paired = True
        print "root is " + str(root) + " and ",
        print "power is " + str(pwr)
        break
if paired == False:
    print "No pair"
0

I have managed to solve this problem with the knowledge you gain from chapter 1 up until 3.1 in the book by Gattug. This finger exercise took me two weeks to do. I am also just started coding.

here is my solution:

num = int(raw_input('Enter an integer: ')) 
root = num 
power = 1 

if root**power == abs(num):
   print ' First pair of integers which equal the integer:', num, 'is root = ', root, 'power = ', power
   root -= 1
while root**power != abs(num) and root > 0:
while power < 6 and root**power != abs(num):
      if not(root**power == abs(num)):
         power +=1
      if not(root**power == abs(num)):
         power +=1 
if power >= 6 and root**power != abs(num):
    power = 1
    root -= 1
if root**power == abs(num):
print 'Second pair of integers which equal the integer:', num, 'is root = ', root, 'power = ', power
elif root**power != abs(num) and root == 0:
print ' there is no other pair of integers that equal', num

I have done it and it is the best book to teach teaching you coding

0

Tried to do this without reframing the spec of the finger exercise, only using what the book introduced so far - this works for positive and negative integers, and, as far as I could tell, it will list all possible pairs, including root=number, pwr=1. One of the keys seems the use of abs in the right places, and to make sure to set root to negative if the user integer was negative. Hope this helps someone like all the other thoughtful contributions helped me.

num = int(raw_input('Enter an integer: '))
pwr = 1
root = 1
ans = ''
while pwr < 6:
    while root**pwr <= abs(num):
        if root**pwr == abs(num):
            if num<0:
                root=-root
        print 'the root is ',root, 'the power is ', pwr
        ans = True
        root= abs(root)+1
    pwr += 1
    root = 1
if ans != True:
    print'No such pair of integers exist'
0

I am self-studying python and my solution is following.

num = int(input('Please enter integer: '))
list= []
list1=[]
for root in range (0,num):
    for pwr in range (1,6):
        if root**pwr == num:
            list.append([root,pwr])
        else:
            list1.append(0)
if list ==[]:
    print ('No root exist')
else:
    print (list)

I created list to save all roots and pwrs in it.

0

I enjoyed Pragu's solution but improved it a bit I think. I stop it if the solution is found that way you wind up with the lowest value for instance in Pragu's solution, 16 will return both 2^3 and 4^2 which are true answers. I had already put in the nonzero parts myself and solved it using for but realized, as Pragu, so eloquently stated, that we hadn't gotten there in the book yet. Here's what I did.

# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-
"""
Created on Sat Jan 13 12:03:09 2018

@author: chief
"""

import random #this imports the random function
mysteryNumber = int(input('Please enter a non-zero positive integer: ')) #give me input Seymour!
if mysteryNumber <= 0: #did they give me a non-zero positive integer?
    print("that wasn't a non-zero positive integer doofenshmirtz!! I'll fix that for you") #Carl would understand
    if mysteryNumber < 0: #make it a positive integer
        mysteryNumber = -mysteryNumber
    if mysteryNumber == 0: #make it a non zero integer by generating random number
        mysteryNumber = random.randint(1,100)
print ('Your number is', mysteryNumber)
root=0 #set the variables or clear the pallet if you will
pwr=1
check=0

while(root**pwr<abs(mysteryNumber)): #first while loop 
    while(pwr<6) and check == 0: # this and logical stops it at the earliest answer otherwise 16 will give you two answers as will 81
        if root**pwr == abs(mysteryNumber): #if then loop checks did you find the answer, if yes then next 2 lines are active, if no then to the else line
            check=1
            print('The root =',root,'or -'+ str(root),'and Power =',pwr, 'will yield', mysteryNumber)
        pwr+=1 #else line, adds 1 to the pwr and moves back to the while statement of while<6
    root+=1 #While pwr <6 is done so we go onto the next root
    pwr=1    #<--------------Resetting pwr to 1 inside the outer loop
if check!=1: #the first while is done now, if we found an answer this argument returns false and the line below doesn't get executed
    print('No rational combination of root and power exists for', mysteryNumber)
0
number = int(raw_input("Enter a number: "))
pwr = 1
root = 2

while root < number:
    pwr = 1
    while pwr < 6:
        if root*pwr == number:
            print'Numbers are', (root, pwr)
        pwr += 1
    root += 1
    print('No such numbers')
1
  • 3
    this may be a correct solution but you haven't offered any explanation to the asker about what is wrong with their approach.
    – niko
    Feb 26, 2018 at 16:57
0

I think that this question was already answered, but hopefully this expands on the current working state. Any feedback is appreciated!

I am currently working through this on MIT OpenCourseWare. I wanted to come up with a solution that would print all possible root/pwr combinations for a given integer, while limiting the exhaustive guesses to it's minimum amount. This is my answer:

intNum = int(input("Please enter an integer: "));
neg = False;

if intNum < 0:
    neg = True;

root = 0;
pwr = 2;

print("The integer is: ", intNum);
# Will always have at least one root/pwr such that intNum=root and pwr = 1
print ("rootFOUND: ", intNum, " pwrFOUND : ", 1);

while 0 < pwr < 6:
    while root**pwr <= abs(intNum):
#        print ("root: ", root, " pwr: ", pwr);
        if root**pwr == abs(intNum):
            if neg and pwr%2 != 0:
                print ("rootFOUND: ", -root, " pwrFOUND : ", pwr);
            elif not neg:
                print ("rootFOUND: ", root, " pwrFOUND : ", pwr);
        root += 1;
    pwr += 1;
    root = 0;

Boundaries that I wanted to account for were:

  1. If the integer was positive
  2. If the integer was negative
  3. If the integer was zero

Thought process:

  1. A positive integer was accomplished by setting the initial root value to zero and incrementing up while root**pwr was less than the integer that was inputted.

  2. A negative integer was accomplished by First, always checking if the integer was negative to begin with. Second, as the root was being incremented, the root**pwr was checked against the absolute value of integer. The last thing that had to be accounted for was the fact that negative integers could only be found by exponential statements if the exponential was odd. This was accomplished by checking if the integer was negative and the exponential was odd.

  3. A zero integer check was accomplished by setting the initial root to zero and always resetting the root back to zero when breaking out of the inner while loop.

Here are some outputs:

Please enter an integer: -4096
The integer is:  -4096
rootFOUND:  -4096  pwrFOUND :  1
rootFOUND:  -16  pwrFOUND :  3

Please enter an integer: 4096
The integer is:  4096
rootFOUND:  4096  pwrFOUND :  1
rootFOUND:  64  pwrFOUND :  2
rootFOUND:  16  pwrFOUND :  3
rootFOUND:  8  pwrFOUND :  4

Please enter an integer: 0
The integer is:  0
rootFOUND:  0  pwrFOUND :  1
rootFOUND:  0  pwrFOUND :  2
rootFOUND:  0  pwrFOUND :  3
rootFOUND:  0  pwrFOUND :  4
rootFOUND:  0  pwrFOUND :  5
0

I was working on this problem, my answer works:

number = int(raw_input("Enter a number: "))
    i = 1

    pwr = 1
    test = 0
    while i <= number/2:
        while pwr < 6:
            if i ** pwr == number:
                print i
                test = 1
            pwr = pwr + 1
        i = i + 1
        pwr = 1
    if test == 0:
        print 'No such pair of integers exist.'
0

I believe this may be a more elegant solution as it provides all the possible roots with minimal initializations and uses only the while loop as per the Guttag text. Please give it a try. I believe it works for all uses cases.

I used the root equals integer to break the loop so that I could reset the power on each iteration. This prevents any overload of the while loop. (Root == integer is the same as the case where power is equal to 1)

integer = int(input("Enter an integer please: "))
root = 0
pwr = 0
while root**pwr < abs(integer):
    root = root + 1
    while pwr < 6:
        pwr = pwr + 1
        if root**pwr == integer:
            print("Root:", root, ", Power:", pwr)
    if root == integer:
        break
    pwr = 0

Outputs for Integer = 343:

Root: 7, Power: 3

Root: 343, Power: 1

0

This is what I have by using two while loops

x = int(input('Enter an integer'))
root = 0
pwr = 0

while(root**pwr < abs(x)):

    while(root**pwr < abs(x) and pwr < 6):
        pwr += 1
        #print('root',root, ' power', pwr, 'result', root**pwr)
        if(root**pwr == abs(x)):
            if(x<=0):
                print('root', -root, 'power', pwr)
            else:
                print('root', root, 'power', pwr)
            break

    if(root**pwr == abs(x)):
        break
    else:
        root+=1
        pwr = 0

if(root**pwr!=x):
    print('no result found')

0
#instead of asking for input, i input random so you could test faster 
#and greater range of integers

input = randint(-10000,10000)
root = 0
power = 1

while root <= abs(input):
  if root**power == abs(input):
      break
  # if power is within bounds, increment, else reset it to 1 and increment 
  # root to loop through
  if power < 6:
      power = power + 1
  else:
      power = 1
      root = root + 1

if root**power != abs(input):
    print("There are no perfect integers")
else:
    if input < 0:
        root = -root
    print("Root:",root,"; Power:",power)
1
  • Please comment what you did!
    – csabinho
    Oct 19, 2019 at 22:56
0

Here is the answer up to date (June 2020) using Python 3.7.6 for the Second Editon of Introduction to Computation and Programming using Python by John Guttag.

As Big Mac wrote

As others have noted, this is the finger exercise for section 3.1 (on exhaustive enumeration) of Introduction to Computation and Programming Using Python by John Guttag, which is the textbook for the massive open online course MITx: 6.00.1x Introduction to Computer Science and Programming Using Python. The textbook and the course use Python 2.7. ... A common mistake in the other answers is that they do not consider all integers. A correct program should solve the problem for all integers, including positive integers and negative integers and zero (zero is also an integer).

Prior to this exercise in Guttag's book, we have been introduced to while loops but not for loops nor the range function, both of which are introduced in the next section.

Finger exercise: Write a program that asks the user to enter an integer and prints two integers, root and pwr, such that 0 < pwr < 6 and root**pwr is equal to the integer entered by the user. If no such pair of integers exists, it should print a message to that effect.

x = int(input('Enter an integer to analyze '))
root = 0
pwr = 1
while pwr < 6:   
    while root**pwr < abs(x):
        root += 1     
    if abs(root**pwr) != abs(x):
        print('no root at the power', pwr, 'for', x)
    else:
        if x < 0:
            root = -root
            if pwr%2 != 0:
                print (root, "**", pwr, '=', x)
            else:
                print('no root at the power', pwr, 'for', x)                
        else:
            print (root, "**", pwr, '=', x)         
    root = 0    
    pwr += 1 

This solution is valid for all integers, is using Python 3, is slightly shorter ( in respect to the knowledge acquired thus far in the Second Editon of the reference book) and slightly more complete (to my understanding) by printing an answer for each power even when no such pair exists.

It will return results like

Enter an integer to analyze -8
-8 ** 1 = -8
no root at the power 2 for -8
-2 ** 3 = -8
no root at the power 4 for -8
no root at the power 5 for -8   
0
x = int(input("Enter an Integer :"))
root = 1
pwr = 0


while root**pwr != abs(x) and x != 0 :
    if pwr == 6 :
        pwr = 0
        root = root + 1
    else :
        pwr = pwr + 1
if x > 0 :
    print(root,"**",pwr,"==",x)
elif x < 0 :
    if pwr%2 == 0 :
        print ("no solution")
    else :
        print(-1*root,"**",pwr,"==",x)
else :
    print("no solution")

Hi guys, I think there will be lot of approach to solve the question. Currently I also just learning phyton from the book.

Since this is the question from iteration part using "while" , I think the solution expected also using "while".

0
integer = int(input('Enter an integer: '))


root = 0
ans=0
isTrue=False
while (root < integer):    
    for pwr in range(1,6):
       ans=root**pwr      
    
       if ans==integer:            
           print(root, 'to the power', pwr, '=', ans)
           isTrue= True        
   root = root+1 

if isTrue != True:
    print('No such pair of integers exists')
           
    
0

Here is my take on the problem using only the functions that were introduced in the book up to the exercise in question. I believe this is the only program among the pre-existing answers here that takes into account ALL possible pairs of roots and powers (including both positive and negative roots for even powers).

num = int(raw_input('Enter an integer: '))
pwr = 1
root = 0
found = False

while pwr < 6:
    while root**pwr <= abs(num):
        if root**pwr == abs(num):
            if num < 0:
                root = -root
            print '(' + str(root) + ')**' + str(pwr) + ' = ' + str(num)
            if pwr%2 == 0:
                root = -root
                print '(' + str(root) + ')**' + str(pwr) + ' = ' + str(num)
                root = -root
            if num < 0:
                root = -root
            found = True
        root = root + 1    
    root = 0
    pwr = pwr + 1

if not found:
    print 'No pairs of integers exist'
0

This code works for all integers, positive or negative and zero. It uses the concepts covered John Guttag's book to that point (3rd edition) except for the "continue" statement, which I found in the web to break an outer loop when the condition is met in the inner loop (i.e. a solution is found). For whatever is worth...

x = int(input('Enter an integer: '))
root = 0
pwr = 2
if x == 0:
    print('integers ', root, 'and ', pwr, 'are such that ', root, '**', pwr, '=', x)
for root in range (abs(x)):
    for pwr in range (2,6):
        #print(root**pwr)   this is temporary code to check what the program does
        if root**pwr == abs(x):
            if x < 0 and pwr%2 != 0:
                print('integers ', -root, 'and ', pwr, 'are such that ', -root, '**', pwr, '=', x)
            else:
                print('integers ', root, 'and ', pwr, 'are such that ', root, '**', pwr, '=', x)
            break
    else:
        continue
    break
#print(root,"**",pwr," = ",root**pwr)   this is temporary code to check what the program does
if root == x-1 and root**pwr != x:  #if root gets to top of range it means a solution was not found on the way
    print('there are no such integers that comply with root**pwr = ',x,'with 1<pwr<6')
0
x = int(input("Enter an integer: "))
pwr = 0
root = 1
while root < (abs(x) / 2):
    while pwr < 6:
        if root ** pwr == abs(x):
            break
        pwr += 1
    if root ** pwr == abs(x):
        break
    pwr = 0
    root += 1

if root ** pwr == abs(x):
    print('root =', root, 'and power =', pwr)
else:
    print(x, 'is not a number such that root**pwr is equal to', x, 'for power less than 6')
1
  • Your answer could be improved with additional supporting information. Please edit to add further details, such as citations or documentation, so that others can confirm that your answer is correct. You can find more information on how to write good answers in the help center.
    – Community Bot
    Aug 18, 2023 at 13:58
0
# this is my solution I think it is the better 
x = int(input(" Enter the number to now if it has perfect cube"))
y = 0
z = 1
s = False 
while z < abs(x):
    z = z + 1
    while  y < abs(x):
        y = y + 1
        if y ** z == abs(x):
            if x < 0:
                print( "the value of y :  ", -y ," the value of z:   " , z, )
            else:
                print ( "the value of y  : ", y, " the value of z: ", z, )
            s = True
    y = 0
if s == False:
    print("ther is no perfect answer ")
1
  • Your answer could be improved with additional supporting information. Please edit to add further details, such as citations or documentation, so that others can confirm that your answer is correct. You can find more information on how to write good answers in the help center. Oct 9, 2023 at 11:54

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