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Solved: It seems that the problem only occurs with PythonWin. I ran everything through the IDLE's python shell and it worked just fine. Must be a bug with PythonWin and not the code itself.

I can't seem to figure out why the following code is giving me a TypeError: 'type' object is not iterable

pastebin: http://pastebin.com/VFZYY4v0

def genList(self):
    #recursively generates a sorted list of child node values
    numList = []
    if self.leftChild != 'none':
        numList.extend(self.leftChild.genList())  #error
    numList.extend(list((self.Value,)))
    if self.rightChild != 'none':
        numList.extend(self.rightChild.genList()) #error
    return numList

code that adds child nodes (works correctly)

def addChild(self, child):
    #add a child node. working
    if child.Value < self.Value:
        if self.leftChild == 'none':
            self.leftChild = child
            child.parent = self
        else:
            self.leftChild.addChild(child)
    elif child.Value > self.Value:
        if self.rightChild == 'none':
            self.rightChild = child
            child.parent = self
        else:
            self.rightChild.addChild(child)

Any help would be appreciated.

Full interpreter session: >>> import BinTreeNode as BTN
>>> node1 = BTN.BinaryTreeNode(5)
>>> node2 = BTN.BinaryTreeNode(2)
>>> node3 = BTN.BinaryTreeNode(12)
>>> node3 = BTN.BinaryTreeNode(16)
>>> node4 = BTN.BinaryTreeNode(4)
>>> node5 = BTN.BinaryTreeNode(13)
>>> node1.addChild(node2)
>>> node1.addChild(node3)
>>> node1.addChild(node4)
>>> node1.addChild(node5)
>>> node4.genList()
<class 'list'>
>>> node1.genList()
Traceback (most recent call last):
File "<interactive input>", line 1, in <module>
File "C:...\python\BinTreeNode.py", line 47, in genList
numList.extend(self.leftChild.genList()) #error
File "C:...\python\BinTreeNode.py", line 52, in genList
TypeError: 'type' object is not iterable

share|improve this question
2  
Can you post the whole error? Or more code. How are leftChild and rightChild generated? –  jgritty Dec 1 '12 at 2:51
1  
@JacobJCallahan don't post the info in comments, where you can't format it properly. Edit your question. –  Mark Reed Dec 1 '12 at 3:03
1  
From the code you provided, it seems that numList.extend() would always be receiving a list instance. I have a feeling this will only be solvable by seeing all of the code :-/ –  jdi Dec 1 '12 at 3:11
1  
numList.extend(list((self.Value,))) seems like it should be just numList.append(self.Value) ... (that's not your problem, but it would be less confusing) -- You didn't happen to shadow the builtin list did you? –  mgilson Dec 1 '12 at 3:17
1  
@jgritty: No that is wrong. That would append a nested list which is not what the OP would want. –  jdi Dec 1 '12 at 3:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

There is nothing in your examples to indicate where the problem is coming from, but what it means is that somehow you are returning an object type and not an object instance. All I can offer at this point is to suggest another way to rework the genList() method and see if it magically fixes your issue.

You could try passing along the same result list through the recursion, instead of returning lots of temporary ones:

def genList(self, numList=None):
    if numList is None:
        numList = []

    if self.leftChild != 'none':
        self.leftChild.genList(numList)

    numList.append(self.Value)

    if self.rightChild != 'none':
        self.rightChild.genList(numList)

    return numList

results = rootNode.genList()

Also, is there a reason you are using 'none' instead of None ? I would just use a None instead of a string.

My suggested edits to your version are here: http://pastebin.com/FGf8Lcdu

And here is the output of your same interpreter code, under python3.3:

In [1]: %cpaste
Pasting code; enter '--' alone on the line to stop or use Ctrl-D.
:>>> import BinTreeNode as BTN
:>>> node1 = BTN.BinaryTreeNode(5)
:>>> node2 = BTN.BinaryTreeNode(2)
:>>> node3 = BTN.BinaryTreeNode(12)
:>>> node3 = BTN.BinaryTreeNode(16)
:>>> node4 = BTN.BinaryTreeNode(4)
:>>> node5 = BTN.BinaryTreeNode(13)
:>>> node1.addChild(node2)
:>>> node1.addChild(node3)
:>>> node1.addChild(node4)
:>>> node1.addChild(node5)
:<EOF>

In [2]: node4.genList()
Out[2]: [4]

In [3]: node1.genList()
Out[3]: [2, 4, 5, 13, 16]
share|improve this answer
    
that actually gives me the same exact error. –  Jacob J Callahan Dec 1 '12 at 4:08
    
My suggested edits to your pastebin: pastebin.com/FGf8Lcdu (Though it works just fine for me in python2.7.3 and python 3.3) –  jdi Dec 1 '12 at 4:55
    
will do. can you paste your interpreter results? you can use the exact same calls i did. –  Jacob J Callahan Dec 1 '12 at 4:56
    
Added the output for ya –  jdi Dec 1 '12 at 5:00
    
Thanks for all your help @jdi –  Jacob J Callahan Dec 1 '12 at 5:08

I would add a couple of prints to see what is the actual type when it gives the error, like:

def genList(self):
    #recursively generates a sorted list of child node values
    numList = []
    if self.leftChild != 'none':
        print self.leftChild.genList(), type(self.leftChild.genList())
        numList.extend(self.leftChild.genList())  #error
    numList.extend(list((self.Value,)))
    if self.rightChild != 'none':
        print self.rightChild.genList(), type(self.rightChild.genList())
        numList.extend(self.rightChild.genList()) #error
    return numList

A not so wild guess... Try instead of list((self.Value,)) to use [self.Value]. I have a feeling it will work... :-)

share|improve this answer
    
i ran the commands through the interpreter and got back that they are just returning a list type for some reason here is the result <class 'list'> –  Jacob J Callahan Dec 1 '12 at 3:04
    
@JacobJCallahan: was the first printed element the list, or was that the second element? –  jdi Dec 1 '12 at 3:08
    
@jdi what was printed was the result of running genList() on a node without children. so the problem seems to be that it is returning the type instead of the list itself –  Jacob J Callahan Dec 1 '12 at 3:13
    
also, the [self.Value] returns the same –  Jacob J Callahan Dec 1 '12 at 3:27
1  
@JacobJCallahan: We need to see more context to know what is wrong here. There is nothing in your current example that indicates where the error would be. –  jdi Dec 1 '12 at 3:28

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