68

Say I have 2 parallel collections, eg: a list of people's names in a List<String> and a list of their age in a List<Int> in the same order (so that any given index in each collection refers to the same person).

I want to iterate through both collections at the same time and fetch the name and age of each person and do something with it. With arrays this is easily done with:

for (int i = 0; i < names.length; i++) {
   do something with names[i] ....
   do something with ages[i].....
}

What would be the most elegant way (in terms of readability and speed) of doing this with collections?

2

8 Answers 8

90
it1 = coll1.iterator();
it2 = coll2.iterator();
while(it1.hasNext() && it2.hasNext()) {
   value1 = it1.next();
   value2 = it2.next();
   do something with it1 and it2;
}

This version terminates when the shorter collection is exhausted; alternatively, you could continue until the longer one is exhausted, setting value1 resp. value2 to null.

4
  • 1
    thanks for the answer but i didn't understand you in case when we want to continue until the longer one is exhausted
    – Hayi
    Jan 21, 2015 at 14:57
  • 5
    This is in fact the official answer: "Use Iterator instead of the for-each construct when you need to: ... Iterate over multiple collections in parallel." The Java™ Tutorials: The Collection Interface Jun 5, 2015 at 4:54
  • 3
    To handle one list running out first, you can use value1 = it1.hasNext() ? it1.next() : null; (ditto for it2) to check before getting the next element. Alternatively, you could use try-catch with NoSuchElementException, which is a bit longer. Jun 5, 2015 at 5:07
  • I would suggest adding either a precondition check that the collections are the same size, or a postcondition check that both iterators are drained. It's rare that you really want to process two lists in parallel but don't care if one is larger than the other (and if you're really doing that, and you're sure it's not a code smell, just remove the checks). checkArgument(coll1.size() == coll2.size()) or checkArgument(!it1.hasNext() && !it2.hasNext()) with Guava's Preconditions.
    – dimo414
    Feb 24, 2017 at 16:53
36

I would create a new object that encapsulates the two. Throw that in the array and iterate over that.

List<Person>

Where

public class Person {
    public string name;
    public int age;
}
8
  • 2
    +1 - very reasonable suggestion, as it is the most extendable Sep 2, 2009 at 4:34
  • 2
    This is the obvious solution - define objects & domain correctly: Age and Name are attributes of a person. Map them in and work with them. Sep 2, 2009 at 4:36
  • 27
    It doesn't quite answer the question of how to create such a List when given separate input lists of name and age however. So an elegant way of iterating over both is still needed in such a case.
    – Dave L.
    Apr 12, 2011 at 23:30
  • 2
    This is the idiomatic Java answer: define a type for it. See What is the equivalent of the C++ Pair<L,R> in Java? for why anonymous pairs are discouraged in Java. Jun 16, 2015 at 2:35
  • 5
    It's good advice when you're able to refactor your code to use one list, but this answer fails to describe how to construct such a list if you're really starting with two separate lists (e.g. if they're coming from different data sources).
    – dimo414
    Feb 24, 2017 at 16:50
12
for (int i = 0; i < names.length; ++i) {
  name = names.get(i);
  age = ages.get(i);
  // do your stuff
}

It doesn't really matter. Your code won't get points for elegance. Just do it so that it works. And please don't bloat.

1
  • 13
    Be forewarned here that not all Lists have efficient get(int) implementations. The double-iterator is less likely to be inefficient.
    – TREE
    Sep 2, 2009 at 13:12
10

You could create an interface for it:

public interface ZipIterator<T,U> {
  boolean each(T t, U u);
}

public class ZipUtils {
  public static <T,U> boolean zip(Collection<T> ct, Collection<U> cu, ZipIterator<T,U> each) {
    Iterator<T> it = ct.iterator();
    Iterator<U> iu = cu.iterator();
    while (it.hasNext() && iu.hasNext()) {
      if (!each.each(it.next(), iu.next()) {
        return false;
      }
    }
    return !it.hasNext() && !iu.hasNext();
  }
}

And then you have:

Collection<String> c1 = ...
Collection<Long> c2 = ...
zip(c1, c2, new ZipIterator<String, Long>() {
  public boolean each(String s, Long l) {
    ...
  }
});
2
  • 3
    And with Java 8's lambdas you can even use it this way: zip(c1, c2, (s, l) -> ... ). (Also, your ZipIterator is basically the same as a BiConsumer.) May 13, 2016 at 13:52
  • seems to be the most elegantly way with java 8 lambdas. Note you get change the type from Collection to Iterable to make it more general
    – Sisyphus
    Nov 5, 2017 at 14:02
4

I took @cletus comment and Improved it abit, And that's what I use:

public static <T,U> void zip(Collection<T> ct, Collection<U> cu, BiConsumer<T, U> consumer) {
    Iterator<T> it = ct.iterator();
    Iterator<U> iu = cu.iterator();
    while (it.hasNext() && iu.hasNext()) {
        consumer.accept(it.next(), iu.next());
    }
}

Usage:

zip(list1, list2, (v1, v2) -> {
    // Do stuff
});
1
  • It'd be wonderful if you could make a zip that consumed an arbitrary number of input streams (perhaps all of the same type). Nov 9, 2018 at 15:43
2

While the submitted solutions are correct I prefer the following one because it follows the guides from effective java item 57: minimize the scope of local variables:

    for (Iterator<String> i = lst1.iterator(), ii = lst2.iterator(); i.hasNext() && ii.hasNext(); ) {
        String e1 = i.next();
        String e2 = ii.next();
        ....
    }
0

As suggested by jeef3, modeling the true domain rather than keeping separate, implicitly coupled Lists is the right way to go... when this is an option.

There are various reasons why you might not be able to adopt this approach. If so...

A. You can use a callback approach, as suggested by cletus.

B. You can still choose to expose an Iterator that exposes domain object element for each composite instance. This approach doesn't force you to keep a parallel List structure around.

private List<String> _names = ...;
private List<Integer> _ages = ...;

Iterator<Person> allPeople() {
  final Iterator<String> ni = _names.iterator();
  final Iterator<Integer> ai = _ages.iterator();
  return new Iterator() {
    public boolean hasNext() {
      return ni.hasNext();
    }
    public Person next() {
      return new Person(ni.next(), ai.next());
    }
    public void remove() {
      ni.remove();
      ai.remove();
    }
  };
}

C. You can use a variation of this and use a RowSet style cursor API. Let's say IPerson is an interface that describes Person. Then we can do:

public interface IPerson {
  String getName();
  void setName(String name);
  ...
}

public interface ICursor<T> {
  boolean next();
  T current();
}

private static class PersonCursor implements IPerson, ICursor<IPerson> {
  private final List<String> _names;
  ...
  private int _index = -1;

  PersonCursor(List<String> names, List<Integer> ages) {
    _names = names;
    ...
  }

  public boolean next() {
    return ++_index < _names.size();
  }

  public Person current() {
    return this;
  }

  public String getName() {
    return _names.get(_index);
  }

  public void setName(String name) {
    _names.set(0, name);
  }

  ...
}

private List<String> _names = ...;
private List<Integer> _ages = ...;

Cursor<Person> allPeople() {
  return new PersonCursor(_names, _ages);
}

Note that the B approach also be made to support updates to list by introducing a Domain interface, and having the Iterator return 'live' objects.

0

I just posted this function in this similar question (which @Nils von Barth asserts is not a duplicate ;) ), but it's equally applicable here:

public static <L,R,M> List<M> zipLists(
    BiFunction<L,R,M> factory, Iterable<L> left, Iterable<R> right) {
  Iterator<L> lIter = left.iterator();
  Iterator<R> rIter = right.iterator();
  ImmutableList.Builder<M> builder = ImmutableList.builder();

  while (lIter.hasNext() && rIter.hasNext()) {
    builder.add(factory.apply(lIter.next(), rIter.next()));
  }

  // Most of the existing solutions fail to enforce that the lists are the same
  // size. That is a *classic* source of bugs. Always enforce your invariants!
  checkArgument(!lIter.hasNext(),
      "Unexpected extra left elements: %s", ImmutableList.copyOf(lIter));
  checkArgument(!rIter.hasNext(),
      "Unexpected extra right elements: %s", ImmutableList.copyOf(rIter));
  return builder.build();
}

You can then provide a factory operation for the BiFunction, such as a value-type's constructor:

List<Person> people = zipLists(Person::new, names, ages);

If you really just want to iterate over them and do some operation, rather than construct a new collection, you could swap the BiFunction for a BiConsumer and have the function return void.

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