I have 3 arrays, for example:

const
  A: Array[0..9] of Byte = ($00, $01, $AA, $A1, $BB, $B1, $B2, $B3, $B4, $FF);
  B: Array[0..2] of Byte = ($A1, $BB, $B1);
  C: Array[0..2] of Byte = ($00, $BB, $FF);

Is there a way to compare and get the index of the right one, instead of checking each byte 1 by 1? For example:

function GetArrayIndex(Source, Value: Array of Byte): Integer;
begin
..
end;

GetArrayIndex(A, B); // results 3
GetArrayIndex(A, C); // results -1

Thank you in advance.

  • 4
    Here is the answer, Is there any “Pos” function to find bytes?. – LU RD Dec 1 '12 at 22:20
  • Great and fast reply. (i spent about 1h and half to find nothing while u did it in ..5'?). Thank you! I have to study some more about pointers and such in order to make use of those functions. – Dimitris Nats Dec 1 '12 at 23:12
  • I will post a reworked version of Andreas answer for you to study. – LU RD Dec 1 '12 at 23:14
up vote 12 down vote accepted
function ByteArrayPos(const SearchArr : array of byte; const CompArr : array of byte) : integer;
//  result=Position or -1 if not found
var
  Comp,Search : AnsiString;
begin
  SetString(Comp, PAnsiChar(@CompArr[0]), Length(CompArr));
  SetString(Search, PAnsiChar(@SearchArr[0]), Length(SearchArr));
  Result := Pos(Search,Comp) - 1;
end;
  • 1
    Awesome! Exactly what i was looking for. – Dimitris Nats Dec 1 '12 at 23:06
  • I wonder if your answer is yes or no. I mean, does Pos perform a check of each byte 1 by 1? – Sertac Akyuz Dec 1 '12 at 23:12
  • Yes and No, of course somwhere has to be done a check byte by byte, but there is no need to be reimplemented. – bummi Dec 1 '12 at 23:18
  • 1
    @bummi - Ok, it makes sense. – Sertac Akyuz Dec 1 '12 at 23:34
  • 1
    @Wouter It works because it operates on strings rather then PAnsiChar. – David Heffernan Dec 2 '12 at 8:24

Here is a reworked version of Andreas answer here.

function BytePos(const Pattern: array of byte; const Buffer : array of byte): Integer;
var
  PatternLength,BufLength: cardinal;
  i,j: cardinal;
  OK: boolean;
begin
  Result := -1;
  PatternLength := Length(Pattern);
  BufLength := Length(Buffer);
  if (PatternLength > BufLength) then
    Exit;
  if (PatternLength = 0) then
    Exit;
  for i := 0 to BufLength - PatternLength do
    if Buffer[i] = Pattern[0] then
    begin
      OK := true;
      for j := 1 to PatternLength - 1 do
        if Buffer[i + j] <> Pattern[j] then
        begin
          OK := false;
          Break;
        end;
      if OK then
        Exit(i);
    end;
end;

begin
  WriteLn(BytePos(B,A)); // 3
  WriteLn(BytePos(C,A)); // -1
  ReadLn;
end.

Bummis answer is to prefer, though. Much better.


Just a remark as noted in the comments.

For small datasets BytePos outperforms ByteArrayPos, while for large datasets (10000 items) the performance is reversed.

This is for the 32-bit mode, where the assembler optimised Pos() system function works at its best for large datasets.

In 64-bit mode though, there is no assembler optimised Pos() function. In my benchmark test, BytePos is 4-6 times faster than ByteArrayPos, for all types of dataset sizes.


Update

The benchmark test was made with XE3.

During the test I discovered a flawed purepascal loop in the System.pas function Pos().

An improvement request has been added, QC111103, where the proposed function is about 3 times faster.

I also optimised the above BytePos a bit and present it here below as ByteposEx().

function BytePosEx(const Pattern,Buffer : array of byte; offset : Integer = 0): Integer;
var
  LoopMax    : Integer;
  OK         : Boolean;
  patternP   : PByte;
  patStart   : Byte;
  i,j        : NativeUInt;
begin
  LoopMax := High(Buffer) - High(Pattern);
  if (offset <= LoopMax) and
     (High(Pattern) >= 0) and
     (offset >= 0) then
  begin
    patternP := @Pattern[0];
    patStart := patternP^;
    for i := NativeUInt(@Buffer[offset]) to NativeUInt(@Buffer[LoopMax]) do
    begin
      if (PByte(i)^ = patStart) then
      begin
        OK := true;
        for j := 1 to High(Pattern) do
          if (PByte(i+j)^ <> patternP[j]) then
          begin
            OK := false;
            Break;
          end;
        if OK then
          Exit(i-NativeUInt(@Buffer[0]));
      end;
    end;
  end;
  Result := -1;
end;
  • Yeah, i can understand your reworked function way easier than the original. Thank you so much for your effort. – Dimitris Nats Dec 1 '12 at 23:25
  • 1
    It's not as easy to read as Bummi's implementation, but in theory this could be much faster because it doesn't copy the data. Therefore +1 for this one too. It could make a difference if it's used often or on large datasets. I didn't actually measure the difference though. – Wouter van Nifterick Dec 2 '12 at 2:20
  • @WoutervanNifterick, I did a benchmark on one small dataset (the one above) and one large dataset (10000 elements). For a hit at the end, BytePos is a little bit more than 3 times faster in the small dataset, while for the large dataset the result is the opposite. Conclusion: The allocation of the two strings in ByteArrayPos will give a performance penalty for small datasets, while the optimised Pos system function excels for large datasets. – LU RD Dec 2 '12 at 8:04
  • @LURD, did you have optimization off or on? – Andreas Hausladen Dec 2 '12 at 10:58
  • 1
    Sorry, deleted last remark. This is what I ment to say: Oh, I should mention that the bench mark was in 32 bit mode. In 64 bit mode, there is no assembler optimised Pos() function. And performance is much worse than BytePos. A factor of 4-6 for both small and large datasets. – LU RD Dec 2 '12 at 12:30

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