25

I want to bypass CSS transition and change a property instantly.
I tried to set transition-duration to 0s before the change and then set transition-duration back to its original value:

$('div').css('width', '200px').delay(1000).queue(function() {
    $(this).css({
        transitionDuration: '0s',
        msTransitionDuration: '0s',
        mozTransitionDuration: '0s',
        webkitTransitionDuration: '0s',
        oTransitionDuration:'0s'
    }).css('width', '10px').css({
        transitionDuration: '2s',
        msTransitionDuration: '2s',
        mozTransitionDuration: '2s',
        webkitTransitionDuration: '2s',
        oTransitionDuration:'2s'
    })
})​

Fiddle
This obviously doesn't work.

I understand that the spec does not define that behavior for this:

Since this specification does not define when computed values change, and thus what changes to computed values are considered simultaneous, authors should be aware that changing any of the transition properties a small amount of time after making a change that might transition can result in behavior that varies between implementations, since the changes might be considered simultaneous in some implementations but not others.

Is there an easy way to do this?

Note: The property I am changing is transform so .animate() would not be an option.

2
  • You do realize that you can animate the transform property ?
    – adeneo
    Dec 2 '12 at 14:58
  • You mean using a step function? That does work for me now but I am leaving this up if I encounter something similar later.
    – TwiNight
    Dec 2 '12 at 15:12

10 Answers 10

13
+400

Since nobody else is posting a valid answer, here goes:

$('div').css('width', '200px').delay(1000).queue(function() {
    $(this).css({transition: '0s', width: '10px'}).delay(1).queue(function() {
        $(this).css({transition:'2s'});
    });
},1000)​;

FIDDLE

Or if it's the other way:

$('div').css({
    transition: '0s'
  }).css('width', '200px').delay(1000).queue(function() {
      $(this).css({width: '10px', transition: '2s'});
});

FIDDLE

jQuery should normalize vendor prefixes these days, so you don't have to type them all yourself.


The issue here is that jQuery attaches all the styles at once, only keeping the last styles, overwriting the previous styles of the same CSS property without ever doing a repaint of the DOM, and testing with native javascript seems to be doing the same thing, so it's probably the browser trying to avoid uneccessary reflows by adding a style just to have it changed in the next line of code, so doing:

$('div').css({
    transition: '0s',
    width: 200
}).css({
    transition: '3s',
    width: 10
});

won't work as only the last style is added.

This is where delay() comes into play, the OP's question was already using delay() so there was no reason not to use it, but removing delay() will of course cause the above issue, where the browser doesn't paint the first style, but only the last etc.

As delay() is really just a fancy timeout, it effectively defers the execution of the second setting of the styles, causing two browser repaints.

As this is most likely a browser issue, and not something we can change, deferring the setting of the second style is the only way to make this work, and using a delay will still work even if it's set to just 1 milliseconds, or one could defer the execution with a regular timeout, which is the usual way to defer execution of a script:

$('div').css({
    transition: '0s',
    width: 200
});

setTimeout(function() {
    $('div').css({
        transition: '3s',
        width: 10
    });
});

FIDDLE

The above will work just fine, as the timeout causes the first setting of the style to be painted by the browser, and defers the setting of the style inside the timeout to a later time, but as no time is set, it's executed as soon as the browser can (but still deferred until after the current script has completed), which for the human eye would seem like immediately, and that solves the issue.

5
  • I knew the delay trick but kinda dislike it. Seems to be the only solution though, so I am marking this accepted. And it also seems that I was using jQ 1.6 for too long now.
    – TwiNight
    Dec 2 '12 at 15:40
  • Tested, in jQ 1.8.3, transition is prefixed but transform is not
    – TwiNight
    Dec 3 '12 at 1:55
  • I don't think this answer is relevant. The point of bypassing transition/animation is to apply the changes immediately (so for example the parent elements can compute the correct height or something). Using delay() defeats the purpose :)
    – Alex
    Nov 26 '13 at 12:11
  • @Alex - But it does answer the question perfectly, as the OP is using delay() in the question and in the posted Fiddle as well, and wanted to know how to do exactly what is posted in my answer.
    – adeneo
    Nov 26 '13 at 12:17
  • @adeneo: this not always seems to works. If I place the code within a setTimeout and a low delay (1ms), sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't: jsfiddle.net/5me3ensm/18 Why this? Try Run it a bounch of time: sometimes the blu move, sometimes not. i.e. it doesn't defer execution.
    – markzzz
    Dec 2 '16 at 15:17
4

If you have control of the CSS

The easiest thing to do is tie the animation to some class, and then at what point you want the animation to no longer be bypassed, you add the class, otherwise no animation is ever set. If the reverse, you generally want the animation, but occasionally want to bypass it, then add the class by default and remove it at time of bypassing.

Example CSS

div{
    height: 100px;
    width: 200px;
    background: red;
}
div.doTransition {
    width: 10px;
    transition: width 2s linear;
    -ms-transition: width 2s linear;
    -moz-transition: width 2s linear;
    -webkit-transition: width 2s linear;
    -o-transition: width 2s linear;
}

See fiddle which creates a click event to start animation when it is desired, but this could be some other programmatic trigger to add the class at the time that one no longer wants to bypass it. This fiddle does the opposite, it assumes the animation is present, but on page load immediately bypasses it by removing the class.

1
  • Let's say you have a .fancyDropdownMenuItem class which applies static styling (i.e. dimensions, background, filters...) as well as transition properties... because it makes sense to group element-relevant styling! But toggling that class to disable transitions will wipe most of the element's styling. Of course that's not an issue if you're writing non-semantic CSS, but I'd rather advocate applying an override style instead.
    – Oleg
    Nov 28 '13 at 0:05
4

Set up an override class that would disable css transitions on an element applied to, !important is perfect for this:

.notransition {
  -webkit-transition: none !important;
  -moz-transition: none !important;
  -o-transition: none !important;
  -ms-transition: none !important;
  transition: none !important;
}

You can now toggleClass to switch the desired behaviour (smooth transition vs instant change):

$('div').
toggleClass('notransition', true). //or false!
css('width', '200px');

Fiddled. IMO one of the advantages of this approach is that you have clear separation between default element styling and the disable all smooth animations flag. This is also a very "wrappable" reusable approach, i.e. you can easily add an optional boolean property to your existing methods that would indicate whether or not it should be executed with transitions.

NB: sometimes you may want to disable transitions on the page altogether for whatever performance/UX reasons. In that case, you can change the selector to .notransition * and disable transition on all descendant elements.

3

The issue is that, since there is no reason for the browser to slow down and execute each operation seperately, it combines them and does both at the same time. Querying offsetHeight is one way to force it to do each operation seperately, as it has to recalculate the height. http://jsfiddle.net/markasoftware/6cTeY/15/ works perfectly

2
  • No, I don't think so. Browser does executes each CSS updates, but simply the repaint doesn't happen. Nov 29 '13 at 9:56
  • with my website I was applying styles then applying transitions immediately afterward, and the same issue occured until I fixed it like this. And anyways, it works, so what's wrong with it? Nov 30 '13 at 0:28
1

This is the only way I could make it work. jQuery seems to be a bit stubborn.

http://fiddle.jshell.net/8qTpe/1/

P.S. There are some errors in your approach:

  1. You are re-sizing to 200px before the delay, thus using the default CSS settings.

  2. You are re-sizing to 10px before the change of the transition back to 2s.

Now jQuery seems to apply all CSS settings in a row so that's why the whole thing does not seem to work.

1

I'd go for a rather clean CSS solution

HTML

<div id="foo"></div>
<button class="out">out</button>
<button class="in">in</button>

JS

$('button.out').click(function(){console.log($('#foo').addClass);$('#foo').addClass('out')})
$('button.in').click(function(){$('#foo').removeClass('out')})

CSS

div{
    height: 100px;
    width: 10px;
    background: red;

    transition: width 0s linear;
    -ms-transition: width 0s linear;
    -moz-transition: width 0s linear;
    -webkit-transition: width 0s linear;
    -o-transition: width 0s linear;
}
div.out {
    width: 200px;
    transition: width 2s linear;
    -ms-transition: width 2s linear;
    -moz-transition: width 2s linear;
    -webkit-transition: width 2s linear;
    -o-transition: width 2s linear;

}

http://jsfiddle.net/6cTeY/19/

1

I usually do it in this vanilla JS fashion.

FIDDLE

HTML

Suppose you have an element

<div id="element"></div>

CSS

Suppose your element has CSS Transitions already active and background: green

#element {
    background: green;
    width: 200px;
    height: 200px;
    -webkit-transition: 'all 0.5s ease-out';
    -moz-transition: 'all 0.5s ease-out';
    -ms-transition: 'all 0.5s ease-out';
    -o-transition: 'all 0.5s ease-out';
}

JS

The element has CSS transitions but we want to change the element's background to BLUE, instantly.

Right after that, we want the element's normal behaviour to return so we can animate it's background to RED.

We need to shut off transitions for a moment and restore them right after.

// grab the element
var element = document.getElementById('element');

// removeTransitions
element.style.webkitTransition   = 'none';
element.style.mozTransition      = 'none';
element.style.msTransition       = 'none';
element.style.oTransition        = 'none';

// apply desired 'instant' property
element.style.background         = 'blue'; // is applied instantly

// this 10ms timeout is necessary for the transitions to be active again
setTimeout(function() {
    element.style.webkitTransition   = 'all 5s ease-out';
    element.style.mozTransition      = 'all 5s ease-out';
    element.style.msTransition       = 'all 5s ease-out';
    element.style.oTransition        = 'all 5s ease-out';

    // apply desired 'animated' property
    element.style.background         = 'red';  // is applied smoothly
}, 10);
0

var ball = document.querySelector('.ball'),
    ballSpeed = 2,
    button = document.querySelector('button');

// Chane to random speed "instantly" (on button "click")
button.addEventListener('click', ()=>{ 
  ballSpeed = Math.random()*8 + 1;
  
  ball.style.transitionDuration = ballSpeed + 's';
  ball.classList.remove('move');
  ball.clientHeight; // <--- triggers repaint
  ball.classList.add('move');
  
  // set button text
  button.textContent = ballSpeed.toFixed(2) + 's';
})

function animate( speed ){
  ball.style.transitionDuration = '0s';
  ball.classList.remove('move');
  ball.clientHeight; // <--- triggers repaint. has to be after "move" class was removed
  
  ball.style.transitionDuration = ballSpeed + 's';
  ball.classList.add('move');
  ball.removeEventListener('transitionend', animate)
  ball.addEventListener('transitionend', animate); // keep rollin..
}

animate();
html, body{ height:100%; overflow:hidden; } 

.ball{
  position: absolute;
  width: 3em;
  height: 3em;
  left:0; right:0; top:0; bottom:0;
  margin: auto;
  
  transition-duration: 2s; /* <-- start speed  */
  transition-timing-function: linear;
}

.ball::after{
  content: '';
  display: block;
  width: 100%;
  height: 100%;
  transform: translateX(100%);
  border-radius:50%;
  background: gold;
}

.ball.move{
  transform: rotate(360deg);
}
<button>2s</button>
<div class="ball"></div>

0

I don't know how this works in JQuery, but you could do this in CSS (at least at the time of writing):

div {
  animation: trans 2s;
}

@keyframes trans {
  0% {
    width: 200px;
  }
  99.9% {
    width: 200px;
  }
  100% {
    width: 10px;
  }
}
0

pure JS solution that should work with JQuery (have not tested).

The problem with the accepted answer is placing a value for the delay, but a better solution is to have a delay of 0. We are gonna use a little trick with the event loop to achieve this:

const button = document.querySelector('button');

function reposition() {
  button.style.transition = 'none';
  button.style.transform = 'translate(-50%)';
  
  setTimeout(() => {
    button.style.transition = '1s';
    button.style.transform = 'translate(0)';
  }, 0);
}

button.addEventListener('click', reposition);
<button>
    Click Me
</button>

This is called a zero delay. It still uses a delay, but you don't have to feel icky about it because this will instantly run when the stack is clear.

If you want to understand why this is, I recommend watching this video

But here's a (messy) short explanation:

Basically what's happening is that setTimeout() will hold the value until a certain amount of time, our time here is 0, but it won't execute yet until the stack is clear, (why? this is, watch the video) because the browser still has to repaint the changes, the re-render will still be in the stack and as it finishes, the function passed to setTimeout() will be executed causing another re-render.

Do I know if this works 100% of the time? In theory, it should, but I'm no expert.

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