35

Suppose I have a directory with some files:

$ ls
a.c  b.c  e.c  k.cpp  s.java

How can I display the result without the file extension(the part following the dot, including that dot)? Like this:

$ <some command>
a
b
e
k
s
55

using sed?

ls -1 | sed -e 's/\..*$//'
  • 8
    FWIW, I'd use ls | sed 's/\(.*\)\..*/\1/' to only strip off the part starting with the last dot. (Also, watch out for . in a directory name, eg. ls ../src – rici Dec 3 '12 at 2:23
  • 2
    ls -1 and ls behave identically when stdout for ls is a pipe. Doesn't matter really... – jim mcnamara Dec 3 '12 at 3:32
  • 4
    @rici: sed -e 's/\.[^.]*$//' – anishsane Dec 3 '12 at 4:13
  • 1
    @anishsane, yeah, or that. s:\.[^./]*$:: would be even better. – rici Dec 3 '12 at 4:24
13
ls | while read fname 
do
    echo ${fname%%.*}
done

Try that.

  • 9
    don't parse ls -- for fname in *; do ... – glenn jackman Dec 3 '12 at 2:50
  • @Glenn - That is a correct approach, yes. The UUOC concept. I thought the OP implied using ls. So apparently did Dyno Hungjun Fu. – jim mcnamara Dec 3 '12 at 3:35
7
ls -a | cut -d "." -f 1

man (1) cut

Very handy, the -d switch defines the delimiter and the -f which field you want.

EDIT: Include riverfall's scenario is also piece of cake as cut can start also from the end, though the logic is somewhat different. Here an example with a bunch of files with random names, some with two dots, some with a single dot and some without extension:

runlevel0@ubuntu:~/test$ ls
test.001.rpx  test.003.rpx  test.005.rpx  test.007.rpx  test.009.rpx  testxxx
test.002.rpx  test.004.rpx  test.006.rpx  test.008.rpx  test_nonum    test_xxx.rtv


runlevel0@ubuntu:~/test$ ls | cut  -d "." -f -2
test.001
test.002
test.003
test.004
test.005
test.006
test.007
test.008
test.009
test_nonum
testxxx
test_xxx.rtv

Using the minus before the field number makes it eliminate all BUT the indicated fields (1,2 in this case) and putting it behind makes it start counting from the end.

This same notation can be used for offset and characters besides of fields (see the man page)

  • 1
    filenames can have more than 1 dot, especially rpm packages – riverfall Jun 13 '17 at 13:36
  • Can anyone tell me why ls | cut -d "." -f -2 > test.txt does not work? – holistic Jan 31 '18 at 12:05
  • no idea mate. I have no idea what you expect to see. I assume that you are aware that you have to read the file with cat, right? – runlevel0 Feb 2 '18 at 13:30

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.