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My database is Postgres 8. I need to cast data type to another. That means, one of columns data type is varchar and need to cast it into int with Postgres in a SELECT statement.

Currently, I get the string value and cast it into int in Java.
Is there any way to do it? Sample code would be highly appreciated.

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    Just FYI, saying "PostgreSQL 8" is a bit like saying "Windows 6". Windows XP is 5.1 (or 5.2 for x64), Vista is 6.0 and Windows 7 is 6.1. They're all pretty different! It's the same with PostgreSQL; there's 5 years and a huge technical difference between PostgreSQL 8.0 and 8.4, so please always specify the full version. Dec 3, 2012 at 4:01

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cast(varchar_col AS int)  -- SQL standard

or

varchar_col::int          -- Postgres syntax shorthand

Theses syntax variants are valid (almost) anywhere. The second may require nesting parentheses in special situations:

And the first may be required where only functional notation is allowed by syntax restrictions:

There are two more variants:

int4(varchar_col)         -- only works for some type names
int '123'                 -- must be an untyped, quoted string literal

Note how I wrote int4(varchar_col). That's the internal type name and there is also a function defined for it. Wouldn't work as integer() or int().

Note also that the last form does not work for array types. int[] '{1,2,3}' has to be '{1,2,3}'::int[] or cast('{1,2,3}' AS int[]).

Details in the manual here and here.

To be valid for integer, the string must be comprised of an optional leading sign (+/-) followed by digits only. Leading / trailing white space is ignored.

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  • it doesn't work if the column is of character data type Sep 2, 2016 at 8:57
  • @AbelMelquiadesCallejo: What is "it"? All of the above works for data type character (except where explicitly noted). The string must be a valid integer, of course. Sep 2, 2016 at 11:45

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