My friend said that there are differences between "mod" and "remainder".

If so, what are those differences in C and C++? Does '%' mean either "mod" or "rem" in C?

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    It probably is ill-defined for negative operands. – Basile Starynkevitch Dec 3 '12 at 12:46
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    I am not a C person :( so can't really answer this within the answer box. But please take a look at this article :) – bonCodigo Dec 3 '12 at 12:49
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    % is remainder. Answer details here -> blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2011/12/05/… – wim Dec 3 '12 at 12:52
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    The question means nothing until you define precisely what the terms mean. – David Heffernan Dec 3 '12 at 12:58
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    @David: the question is about the meanings of the terms. If you say that the question has no meaning, despite several people understanding it in the way that the questioner intended, then I think you have to be more specific what you mean by the word "mean" ;-) – Steve Jessop Dec 3 '12 at 13:53

There is a difference between modulus and remainder. For example:

-21 mod 4 is 3 because -21 + 4 x 6 is 3.

But -21 divided by 4 gives -5 with a remainder of -1.

For positive values, there is no difference.

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    % means rem in C. – banuj Dec 3 '12 at 13:17
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    @Jinxiao: in C89 it was implementation-defined: % was always the remainder, but it might also be the modulus (i.e. always positive), because in C89 integer division was permitted to round towards negative infinity instead of towards 0. So in C89, -5 / 2 could be -2 with remainder -1, or -3 with remainder 1, the implementation just had to document which. C99 removed the flexibility, so now -5 / 2 is always -2. – Steve Jessop Dec 3 '12 at 13:23
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    Actually, it is not clear what modulus is. There seem to be many different definitions, depending on the context and the language. See the wikipedia article about modulo_operation. In some contexts, it is actually the same as remainder. – Rudy Velthuis Jun 8 '14 at 17:44
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    Can someone explain the steps in the first calculation? How -21 mod 4 is 3? Why the calculation is -21 + 4 x 6? – Oz Edri Dec 5 '15 at 20:23
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    @OzEdri To get some number mod 4, you add whatever integer multiple of 4 it takes to get a number between 0 and 3. For -21, that integer is 6 because -21 + 4 x 6 is between 0 and 3. – David Schwartz Dec 6 '15 at 6:53

Does '%' mean either "mod" or "rem" in C?

In C, % is the remainder.

..., the result of the / operator is the algebraic quotient with any fractional part discarded ... (This is often called "truncation toward zero".) C11dr §6.5.5 6

The operands of the % operator shall have integer type. C11dr §6.5.5 2

The result of the / operator is the quotient from the division of the first operand by the second; the result of the % operator is the remainder ... C11dr §6.5.5 5


What's the difference between “mod” and “remainder”?

C does not define "mod", such as the integer modulus function used in Euclidean division or other modulo. "Euclidean mod" differs from C's a%b operation when a is negative.

 // a % b
 7 %  3 -->  1  
 7 % -3 -->  1  
-7 %  3 --> -1  
-7 % -3 --> -1   

Modulo as Euclidean division

 7 modulo  3 -->  1  
 7 modulo -3 -->  1  
-7 modulo  3 -->  2  
-7 modulo -3 -->  2   

Candidate modulo code:

int modulo_Euclidian(int a, int b) {
  int m = a % b;
  if (m < 0) {
    // m += (b < 0) ? -b : b; // avoid this form: it is UB when b == INT_MIN
    m = (b < 0) ? m - b : m + b;
  }
  return m;
}

Note about floating point: double fmod(double x, double y), even though called "fmod", it is not the same as Euclidean division "mod", but similar to C integer remainder:

The fmodfunctions compute the floating-point remainder of x/y. C11dr §7.12.10.1 2

fmod( 7,  3) -->  1.0  
fmod( 7, -3) -->  1.0  
fmod(-7,  3) --> -1.0  
fmod(-7, -3) --> -1.0   

Note: C also has a similar named function double modf(double value, double *iptr) which breaks the argument value into integral and fractional parts, each of which has the same type and sign as the argument.

Modulus, in modular arithmetic as you're referring, is the value left over or remaining value after arithmetic division. This is commonly known as remainder. % is formally the remainder operator in C / C++. Example:

7 % 3 = 1  // dividend % divisor = remainder

What's left for discussion is how to treat negative inputs to this % operation. Modern C and C++ produce a signed remainder value for this operation where the sign of the result always matches the dividend input without regard to the sign of the divisor input.

In mathematics the result of the modulo operation is the remainder of the Euclidean division. However, other conventions are possible. Computers and calculators have various ways of storing and representing numbers; thus their definition of the modulo operation depends on the programming language and/or the underlying hardware.

 7 modulo  3 -->  1  
 7 modulo -3 --> -2 
-7 modulo  3 -->  2  
-7 modulo -3 --> -1 
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    The wiki Euclidean division asserts 0 ≤ r < |b| which means the remainder aka "modulo operation." is always at least 0. What definition are you using that results in -2 and -1? – chux Jun 14 '16 at 18:51
  • sir, i dont no but i just google 7 modulo -3 --> -2 .and.-7 modulo -3 --> -1 please explain sir why this happened – shub sharma Jun 15 '16 at 7:17
  • is our calculator gives % (remainder) instead of mod..... confused – shub sharma Jun 15 '16 at 7:35
  • Google uses a different definition of modulo (signed modulo?) than Wiki Euclidean division (as described by Raymond T. Boute). This discusses the differences more. Moral of the story: a%b and a modulo b have the same meaning when a,b are positive. C99 defines % precisely with negative values. C calls this "remainder'. "Modulo" has various definitions in the world concerning negative values. C spec only uses "modulo" in the context of positive numbers. – chux Jun 15 '16 at 14:21

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