87

When I set up equal aspect ratio for 3d graph the z-axis does not change to 'equal'. So, this:

fig = pylab.figure()
mesFig = fig.gca(projection='3d', adjustable='box')
mesFig.axis('equal')
mesFig.plot(xC, yC, zC, 'r.')
mesFig.plot(xO, yO, zO, 'b.')
pyplot.show()

gives me the following: enter image description here

where obviously the unit length of z-axis is not equal to x- and y-units.

How can I make the unit length of all three axes equal? All the solutions I could find did not work. Thank you.

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70

I believe matplotlib does not yet set correctly equal axis in 3D... But I found a trick some times ago (I don't remember where) that I've adapted using it. The concept is to create a fake cubic bounding box around your data. You can test it with the following code:

from mpl_toolkits.mplot3d import Axes3D
from matplotlib import cm
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.gca(projection='3d')
ax.set_aspect('equal')

X = np.random.rand(100)*10+5
Y = np.random.rand(100)*5+2.5
Z = np.random.rand(100)*50+25

scat = ax.scatter(X, Y, Z)

# Create cubic bounding box to simulate equal aspect ratio
max_range = np.array([X.max()-X.min(), Y.max()-Y.min(), Z.max()-Z.min()]).max()
Xb = 0.5*max_range*np.mgrid[-1:2:2,-1:2:2,-1:2:2][0].flatten() + 0.5*(X.max()+X.min())
Yb = 0.5*max_range*np.mgrid[-1:2:2,-1:2:2,-1:2:2][1].flatten() + 0.5*(Y.max()+Y.min())
Zb = 0.5*max_range*np.mgrid[-1:2:2,-1:2:2,-1:2:2][2].flatten() + 0.5*(Z.max()+Z.min())
# Comment or uncomment following both lines to test the fake bounding box:
for xb, yb, zb in zip(Xb, Yb, Zb):
   ax.plot([xb], [yb], [zb], 'w')

plt.grid()
plt.show()

z data are about an order of magnitude larger than x and y, but even with equal axis option, matplotlib autoscale z axis:

bad

But if you add the bounding box, you obtain a correct scaling:

enter image description here

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  • In this case you do not even need the equal statement - it will be always equal. – user1329187 Dec 5 '12 at 11:56
  • 1
    This works fine if you are plotting only one set of data but what about when there are more data sets all on the same 3d plot? In question, there were 2 data sets so it's a simple thing to combine them but that could get unreasonable quickly if plotting several different data sets. – Steven C. Howell Jun 9 '15 at 14:43
  • @stvn66, I was plotting up to five data sets in one graph with this solutions and it worked fine for me. – user1329187 Feb 1 '16 at 9:55
  • 1
    This works perfectly. For those who want this in function form, which takes an axis object and performs the operations above, I encourage them to check out @karlo answer below. It is a slightly cleaner solution. – spurra Dec 4 '18 at 7:54
  • @user1329187 -- I found this did not work for me without the equal statement. – supergra Jan 9 '19 at 22:17
58

I like the above solutions, but they do have the drawback that you need to keep track of the ranges and means over all your data. This could be cumbersome if you have multiple data sets that will be plotted together. To fix this, I made use of the ax.get_[xyz]lim3d() methods and put the whole thing into a standalone function that can be called just once before you call plt.show(). Here is the new version:

from mpl_toolkits.mplot3d import Axes3D
from matplotlib import cm
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np

def set_axes_equal(ax):
    '''Make axes of 3D plot have equal scale so that spheres appear as spheres,
    cubes as cubes, etc..  This is one possible solution to Matplotlib's
    ax.set_aspect('equal') and ax.axis('equal') not working for 3D.

    Input
      ax: a matplotlib axis, e.g., as output from plt.gca().
    '''

    x_limits = ax.get_xlim3d()
    y_limits = ax.get_ylim3d()
    z_limits = ax.get_zlim3d()

    x_range = abs(x_limits[1] - x_limits[0])
    x_middle = np.mean(x_limits)
    y_range = abs(y_limits[1] - y_limits[0])
    y_middle = np.mean(y_limits)
    z_range = abs(z_limits[1] - z_limits[0])
    z_middle = np.mean(z_limits)

    # The plot bounding box is a sphere in the sense of the infinity
    # norm, hence I call half the max range the plot radius.
    plot_radius = 0.5*max([x_range, y_range, z_range])

    ax.set_xlim3d([x_middle - plot_radius, x_middle + plot_radius])
    ax.set_ylim3d([y_middle - plot_radius, y_middle + plot_radius])
    ax.set_zlim3d([z_middle - plot_radius, z_middle + plot_radius])

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.gca(projection='3d')
ax.set_aspect('equal')

X = np.random.rand(100)*10+5
Y = np.random.rand(100)*5+2.5
Z = np.random.rand(100)*50+25

scat = ax.scatter(X, Y, Z)

set_axes_equal(ax)
plt.show()
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  • Be aware that using means as the center point won't work in all cases, you should use midpoints. See my comment on tauran's answer. – Rainman Noodles Mar 17 '16 at 18:38
  • 1
    My code above does not take the mean of the data, it takes the mean of the existing plot limits. My function is thus guaranteed to keep in view any points that were in view according to the plot limits set before it was called. If the user has already set plot limits too restrictively to see all data points, that is a separate issue. My function allows more flexibility because you may want to view only a subset of the data. All I do is expand axis limits so the aspect ratio is 1:1:1. – karlo Apr 10 '16 at 18:18
  • Another way to put it: if you take a mean of only 2 points, namely the bounds on a single axis, then that mean IS the midpoint. So, as far as I can tell, Dalum's function below should be mathematically equivalent to mine and there was nothing to ``fix''. – karlo Apr 10 '16 at 18:36
  • 11
    Vastly superior to the currently accepted solution that is a mess when you start having lots of objects of different nature. – P-Gn Jul 14 '17 at 13:46
  • 1
    I really like the solution, but after I updated anaconda, ax.set_aspect("equal") reported error: NotImplementedError: It is not currently possible to manually set the aspect on 3D axes – Ewan Jun 3 at 8:29
51

I simplified Remy F's solution by using the set_x/y/zlim functions.

from mpl_toolkits.mplot3d import Axes3D
from matplotlib import cm
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.gca(projection='3d')
ax.set_aspect('equal')

X = np.random.rand(100)*10+5
Y = np.random.rand(100)*5+2.5
Z = np.random.rand(100)*50+25

scat = ax.scatter(X, Y, Z)

max_range = np.array([X.max()-X.min(), Y.max()-Y.min(), Z.max()-Z.min()]).max() / 2.0

mid_x = (X.max()+X.min()) * 0.5
mid_y = (Y.max()+Y.min()) * 0.5
mid_z = (Z.max()+Z.min()) * 0.5
ax.set_xlim(mid_x - max_range, mid_x + max_range)
ax.set_ylim(mid_y - max_range, mid_y + max_range)
ax.set_zlim(mid_z - max_range, mid_z + max_range)

plt.show()

enter image description here

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  • 1
    I like the simplified code. Just be aware that some (very few) data points may not get plotted. For example, suppose that X=[0, 0, 0, 100] so that X.mean()=25. If max_range comes out to be 100 (from X), then you're x-range will be 25 +- 50, so [-25, 75] and you'll miss the X[3] data point. The idea is very nice though, and easy to modify to make sure you get all the points. – TravisJ Feb 10 '15 at 16:25
  • 1
    Beware that using means as the center is not correct. You should use something like midpoint_x = np.mean([X.max(),X.min()]) and then set the limits to midpoint_x +/- max_range. Using the mean only works if the mean is located at the midpoint of the dataset, which is not always true. Also, a tip: you can scale max_range to make the graph look nicer if there are points near or on the boundaries. – Rainman Noodles Mar 17 '16 at 18:37
  • After I updated anaconda, ax.set_aspect("equal") reported error: NotImplementedError: It is not currently possible to manually set the aspect on 3D axes – Ewan Jun 3 at 8:30
  • Rather than calling set_aspect('equal'), use set_box_aspect([1,1,1]), as described in my answer below. It's working for me in matplotlib version 3.3.1! – AndrewCox Aug 27 at 23:06
17

Adapted from @karlo's answer to make things even cleaner:

def set_axes_equal(ax: plt.Axes):
    """Set 3D plot axes to equal scale.

    Make axes of 3D plot have equal scale so that spheres appear as
    spheres and cubes as cubes.  Required since `ax.axis('equal')`
    and `ax.set_aspect('equal')` don't work on 3D.
    """
    limits = np.array([
        ax.get_xlim3d(),
        ax.get_ylim3d(),
        ax.get_zlim3d(),
    ])
    origin = np.mean(limits, axis=1)
    radius = 0.5 * np.max(np.abs(limits[:, 1] - limits[:, 0]))
    _set_axes_radius(ax, origin, radius)

def _set_axes_radius(ax, origin, radius):
    x, y, z = origin
    ax.set_xlim3d([x - radius, x + radius])
    ax.set_ylim3d([y - radius, y + radius])
    ax.set_zlim3d([z - radius, z + radius])

Usage:

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.gca(projection='3d')
ax.set_aspect('equal')         # important!

# ...draw here...

set_axes_equal(ax)             # important!
plt.show()

EDIT: This answer does not work on more recent versions of Matplotlib due to the changes merged in pull-request #13474, which is tracked in issue #17172 and issue #1077. As a temporary workaround to this, one can remove the newly added lines in lib/matplotlib/axes/_base.py:

  class _AxesBase(martist.Artist):
      ...

      def set_aspect(self, aspect, adjustable=None, anchor=None, share=False):
          ...

+         if (not cbook._str_equal(aspect, 'auto')) and self.name == '3d':
+             raise NotImplementedError(
+                 'It is not currently possible to manually set the aspect '
+                 'on 3D axes')
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  • Love this, but after I updated anaconda, ax.set_aspect("equal") reported error: NotImplementedError: It is not currently possible to manually set the aspect on 3D axes – Ewan Jun 3 at 8:31
  • @Ewan I added some links at the bottom of my answer to help in investigation. It looks as if the MPL folks are breaking workarounds without properly fixing the issue for some reason. ¯\\_(ツ)_/¯ – Mateen Ulhaq Jun 4 at 16:16
  • I think I found a workaround (that doesn't require modifying the source code) for the NotImplementedError (full description in my answer below); basically add ax.set_box_aspect([1,1,1]) before calling set_axes_equal – AndrewCox Aug 27 at 23:05
11

Simple fix!

I've managed to get this working in version 3.3.1.

It looks like this issue has perhaps been resolved in PR#17172; You can use the ax.set_box_aspect([1,1,1]) function to ensure the aspect is correct (see the notes for the set_aspect function). When used in conjunction with the bounding box function(s) provided by @karlo and/or @Matee Ulhaq, the plots now look correct in 3D!

matplotlib 3d plot with equal axes

Minimum Working Example

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import mpl_toolkits.mplot3d
import numpy as np

# Functions from @Mateen Ulhaq and @karlo
def set_axes_equal(ax: plt.Axes):
    """Set 3D plot axes to equal scale.

    Make axes of 3D plot have equal scale so that spheres appear as
    spheres and cubes as cubes.  Required since `ax.axis('equal')`
    and `ax.set_aspect('equal')` don't work on 3D.
    """
    limits = np.array([
        ax.get_xlim3d(),
        ax.get_ylim3d(),
        ax.get_zlim3d(),
    ])
    origin = np.mean(limits, axis=1)
    radius = 0.5 * np.max(np.abs(limits[:, 1] - limits[:, 0]))
    _set_axes_radius(ax, origin, radius)

def _set_axes_radius(ax, origin, radius):
    x, y, z = origin
    ax.set_xlim3d([x - radius, x + radius])
    ax.set_ylim3d([y - radius, y + radius])
    ax.set_zlim3d([z - radius, z + radius])

# Generate and plot a unit sphere
u = np.linspace(0, 2*np.pi, 100)
v = np.linspace(0, np.pi, 100)
x = np.outer(np.cos(u), np.sin(v)) # np.outer() -> outer vector product
y = np.outer(np.sin(u), np.sin(v))
z = np.outer(np.ones(np.size(u)), np.cos(v))

fig = plt.figure()
ax = fig.gca(projection='3d')
ax.plot_surface(x, y, z)

ax.set_box_aspect([1,1,1]) # IMPORTANT - this is the new, key line
# ax.set_proj_type('ortho') # OPTIONAL - default is perspective (shown in image above)
set_axes_equal(ax) # IMPORTANT - this is also required
plt.show()
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  • Yes, finally! Thanks - if I only could upvote you to the top :) – N. Jonas Figge Sep 26 at 11:57
7

EDIT: user2525140's code should work perfectly fine, although this answer supposedly attempted to fix a non--existant error. The answer below is just a duplicate (alternative) implementation:

def set_aspect_equal_3d(ax):
    """Fix equal aspect bug for 3D plots."""

    xlim = ax.get_xlim3d()
    ylim = ax.get_ylim3d()
    zlim = ax.get_zlim3d()

    from numpy import mean
    xmean = mean(xlim)
    ymean = mean(ylim)
    zmean = mean(zlim)

    plot_radius = max([abs(lim - mean_)
                       for lims, mean_ in ((xlim, xmean),
                                           (ylim, ymean),
                                           (zlim, zmean))
                       for lim in lims])

    ax.set_xlim3d([xmean - plot_radius, xmean + plot_radius])
    ax.set_ylim3d([ymean - plot_radius, ymean + plot_radius])
    ax.set_zlim3d([zmean - plot_radius, zmean + plot_radius])
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  • You still need to do: ax.set_aspect('equal') or the tick values may be screwed up. Otherwise good solution. Thanks, – Tony Power Feb 22 '19 at 15:28
1

As of matplotlib 3.3.0, Axes3D.set_box_aspect seems to be the recommended approach.

import numpy as np

xs, ys, zs = <your data>
ax = <your axes>

# Option 1: aspect ratio is 1:1:1 in data space
ax.set_box_aspect((np.ptp(xs), np.ptp(ys), np.ptp(zs)))

# Option 2: aspect ratio 1:1:1 in view space
ax.set_box_aspect((1, 1, 1))
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