I find elements on a web page that have been positioned fixed to be in my way frequently. I'd like to find a way to disable position: fixed CSS rules in any web site that I visit.

I wrote a userscript (Firefox, Greasemonkey) that scans every node in the document and figures out if it has a computed style position fixed, then overrides that to be static.

Is there a better way to accomplish my goal?

This is the script I wrote, I've narrowed it to just divs for now:

Array.forEach(
    document.querySelectorAll("div")
    ,function(el) {
        if (window.getComputedStyle(el).position === 'fixed') {
            el.style.position = 'static';
        }
    }
);
  • 2
    Purely just wondering why you want to do this? Wouldn't it break some styling that "relies" on fixed positioning? I know it's unrelated to the question, I'm just wondering – Ian Dec 4 '12 at 4:30
  • @Ian Maybe he's making a screenshot plugin? – Derek 朕會功夫 Dec 4 '12 at 4:34
  • 2
    I've gotten used to zooming a page on my desktop until the main content fills the window, like viewing a page on my cell phone. Perhaps I'm old. Fixed position elements frequently overlay the content. I think that fixed elements are generally divorced from page content, so I don't expect too much breakage. – Rob Dec 4 '12 at 4:37
  • for(var a=document.querySelectorAll("*"),i=0,e;e=a[i];i++)"fixed"==getComputedStyle(e).position&&(e.style.position="static") -Jeremy Ashkenas – PHearst Nov 18 '14 at 22:07
  • The previous comment seems to contain zero-width spaces, for some reason, so it's not copy-pastable (though it does work). – aplaice Mar 14 '17 at 20:06
up vote 5 down vote accepted

If your Greasemonkey script works, it is probably the most cost effective way to eliminate fixed-positioned styling.

Some alternatives that require much more effort but will use less CPU/memory per page:

  1. Write an Add-on that:

    1. Deletes CSS style rules as they are loaded. (Greasemonkey cannot always do this because of cross-domain issues.)
    2. Uses Mutation Observers to intercept javascript attempts to set position: fixed.


  2. Fork and compile your own version of Firefox that ignores position: fixed. You'd probably want this controlled by both a "blacklist" and a "whitelist".

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