235

I already have read the documentation of Node.js and, unless if I missed something, it does not tell what the parameters contain in certain operations, in particular fs.mkdir(). As you can see in the documentation, it's not very much.

Currently, I have this code, which tries to create a folder or use an existing one instead:

fs.mkdir(path,function(e){
    if(!e || (e && e.code === 'EEXIST')){
        //do something with contents
    } else {
        //debug
        console.log(e);
    }
});

But I wonder is this the right way to do it? Is checking for the code EEXIST the right way to know that the folder already exists? I know I can do fs.stat() before making the directory, but that would already be two hits to the filesystem.

Secondly, is there a complete or at least a more detailed documentation of Node.js that contains details as to what error objects contain, what parameters signify etc.

1
  • 34
    Small nitpick, but get rid of the e &&. If !e fails, then you know e is truthy. Dec 4, 2012 at 4:46

15 Answers 15

279
+300

Edit: Because this answer is very popular, I have updated it to reflect up-to-date practices.

Node >=10

The new { recursive: true } option of Node's fs now allows this natively. This option mimics the behaviour of UNIX's mkdir -p. It will recursively make sure every part of the path exist, and will not throw an error if any of them do.

(Note: it might still throw errors such as EPERM or EACCESS, so better still wrap it in a try {} catch (e) {} if your implementation is susceptible to it.)

Synchronous version.

fs.mkdirSync(dirpath, { recursive: true })

Async version

await fs.promises.mkdir(dirpath, { recursive: true })

Older Node versions

Using a try {} catch (err) {}, you can achieve this very gracefully without encountering a race condition.

In order to prevent dead time between checking for existence and creating the directory, we simply try to create it straight up, and disregard the error if it is EEXIST (directory already exists).

If the error is not EEXIST, however, we ought to throw an error, because we could be dealing with something like an EPERM or EACCES

function ensureDirSync (dirpath) {
  try {
    return fs.mkdirSync(dirpath)
  } catch (err) {
    if (err.code !== 'EEXIST') throw err
  }
}

For mkdir -p-like recursive behaviour, e.g. ./a/b/c, you'd have to call it on every part of the dirpath, e.g. ./a, ./a/b, .a/b/c

6
  • var fs = Npm.require('fs'); var dir = process.env.PWD + '/files/users/' + this.userId + '/'; try { fs.mkdirSync(dir); } catch (e) { if (e.code != 'EEXIST') throw e; }
    – Aaron
    Dec 22, 2014 at 20:19
  • I tried your code, create a js-script that uses the catalog creation like this: mkdirpSync(path.join(__dirname, 'first', 'second', 'third', 'ololol', 'works')); But got this error: $ node 1.js fs.js:747 return binding.mkdir(pathModule._makeLong(path), ^ Error: EPERM, operation not permitted 'C:\' at Error (native) at Object.fs.mkdirSync (fs.js:747:18) at mkdirpSync (C:\Users\MAXIM\Desktop\test\1.js:15:8) at Object.<anonymous> (C:\Users\MAXIM\Desktop\test\1.js:19:1) ... Could you suggest what could be wrong? Used on windows obviously :) May 22, 2015 at 13:44
  • EPERM seems like a permission issue, so the script would haven broken execution anyway May 22, 2015 at 13:50
  • I think that would be better: var mkdirpSync = function (dirpath) { var parts = dirpath.split(path.sep); for( var i = 1; i <= parts.length; i++ ) { try { fs.mkdirSync( path.join.apply(null, parts.slice(0, i)) ); } catch (error) { if ( error.code != 'EEXIST' ){ throw error; } } } }
    – manish
    Aug 26, 2015 at 15:55
  • 2
    warning: it doesn't work if your path starts with a /
    – acemtp
    Mar 1, 2016 at 18:08
244

Good way to do this is to use mkdirp module.

$ npm install mkdirp

Use it to run function that requires the directory. Callback is called after path is created or if path did already exists. Error err is set if mkdirp failed to create directory path.

var mkdirp = require('mkdirp');
mkdirp('/tmp/some/path/foo', function(err) { 

    // path exists unless there was an error

});
13
  • 6
    It seems to me the correct (read 'no-dependency-added') answer would be the one down low, by @Raugaral, using fs.exists(Sync). Jan 20, 2015 at 20:17
  • 5
    @RicardoPedroni The correct way is to use a module. Modules are usually whole-heartedly trying to solve one problem, and are often maintained. You can update them easily with npm. Also, you should specifically avoid using fs.exists[Sync] as its use implies race conditions.
    – 1j01
    Apr 12, 2015 at 14:00
  • 22
    @1j01 I don't believe the correct way is to use a module if the platform natively supports the operation. That's a road to chaos. I have to agree that there are better answers from a technical standpoint.
    – c..
    Jul 12, 2015 at 3:49
  • 3
    @1j01 Also, using Sync operations imply race conditions because their use is a resolution to them.
    – c..
    Jul 12, 2015 at 3:57
  • 2
    Why would you not use the internal node fs functionality?
    – Seal
    Oct 6, 2016 at 18:19
76

If you want a quick-and-dirty one liner, use this:

fs.existsSync("directory") || fs.mkdirSync("directory");
5
  • 2
    fs.exists is deprecated: nodejs.org/api/fs.html#fs_fs_exists_path_callback
    – adius
    Jul 29, 2016 at 10:27
  • 9
    fs.existsSync(...) is not deprecated, though, so this answer seems ok. Apr 3, 2017 at 22:25
  • Heads up! Won't work for "dir/foo/bar" i.e lacks the mkdir -p flag feature
    – Karl Pokus
    Oct 2, 2018 at 8:39
  • This also has a race condition
    – Evert
    Jan 24, 2019 at 21:37
  • 1
    With @christophe-marois answer's recursive flag, the equivalent to POSIX mkdir -p flag is included and it also works for folders missing in the path: fs.existsSync("dir/foo/bar") || fs.mkdirSync("dir/foo/bar", {recursive: true}).
    – andiOak
    Nov 21, 2022 at 18:51
27

The node.js docs for fs.mkdir basically defer to the Linux man page for mkdir(2). That indicates that EEXIST will also be indicated if the path exists but isn't a directory which creates an awkward corner case if you go this route.

You may be better off calling fs.stat which will tell you whether the path exists and if it's a directory in a single call. For (what I'm assuming is) the normal case where the directory already exists, it's only a single filesystem hit.

These fs module methods are thin wrappers around the native C APIs so you've got to check the man pages referenced in the node.js docs for the details.

1
  • 20
    Calling stat before mkdir has the potential for a race condition -- bear this in mind. Dec 19, 2013 at 9:52
26

You can use this:

if(!fs.existsSync("directory")){
    fs.mkdirSync("directory", 0766, function(err){
        if(err){
            console.log(err);
            // echo the result back
            response.send("ERROR! Can't make the directory! \n");
        }
    });
}
5
  • 1
    -1. I don't believe this works, statSync will throw an error if the entity does not exist at all, crashing the code. You need to wrap this in a try/catch block. Mar 4, 2014 at 22:05
  • 2
    Sorry, i'm wrong. change "statSync" for "existsSync"
    – Raugaral
    Mar 4, 2014 at 22:45
  • 5
    According to nodejs.org/api/fs.html#fs_fs_mkdirsync_path_mode the Sync variant of mkdir does not accept a callback
    – danwellman
    Oct 22, 2014 at 8:37
  • 1
    According to nodejs.org/api/fs.html#fs_fs_existssync_path, fs.existsSync() and fs.exists() will be deprecated.
    – pau.moreno
    Jun 19, 2015 at 14:47
  • Wrong. fs.exists() has been deprecated due to incompatible callback params. The fs.existsSync() method still works.
    – Amesys
    Jul 23, 2020 at 15:07
9

I propose a solution without modules (accumulate modules is never recommended for maintainability especially for small functions that can be written in a few lines...) :

LAST UPDATE :

In v10.12.0, NodeJS impletement recursive options :

// Create recursive folder
fs.mkdir('my/new/folder/create', { recursive: true }, (err) => { if (err) throw err; });

UPDATE :

// Get modules node
const fs   = require('fs');
const path = require('path');

// Create 
function mkdirpath(dirPath)
{
    if(!fs.accessSync(dirPath, fs.constants.R_OK | fs.constants.W_OK))
    {
        try
        {
            fs.mkdirSync(dirPath);
        }
        catch(e)
        {
            mkdirpath(path.dirname(dirPath));
            mkdirpath(dirPath);
        }
    }
}

// Create folder path
mkdirpath('my/new/folder/create');
6
  • fs.exists() is deprecated in node v9. use fs.access() instead. (returns undefined if the file exists; otherwise throws an error ENOENT)
    – chharvey
    Mar 28, 2018 at 20:14
  • Without any npm package, it's working. It a valuable code. Thanks Jul 31, 2018 at 6:49
  • This one is quite better for creating a folder under existing long path ;) Thanks, man.
    – Tsung Wu
    Feb 15, 2019 at 5:29
  • 1
    What about fs.mkdirSync('my/new/folder/create', {recursive: true}) ?
    – saitho
    Mar 10, 2019 at 14:12
  • Thanks ! I update my post to help others. Node 10.12.0 was too recent.
    – Liberateur
    Mar 11, 2019 at 13:39
4

You can also use fs-extra, which provide a lot frequently used file operations.

Sample Code:

var fs = require('fs-extra')

fs.mkdirs('/tmp/some/long/path/that/prob/doesnt/exist', function (err) {
  if (err) return console.error(err)
  console.log("success!")
})

fs.mkdirsSync('/tmp/another/path')

docs here: https://github.com/jprichardson/node-fs-extra#mkdirsdir-callback

4

Here is the ES6 code which I use to create a directory (when it doesn't exist):

const fs = require('fs');
const path = require('path');

function createDirectory(directoryPath) {
  const directory = path.normalize(directoryPath);

  return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
    fs.stat(directory, (error) => {
      if (error) {
        if (error.code === 'ENOENT') {
          fs.mkdir(directory, (error) => {
            if (error) {
              reject(error);
            } else {
              resolve(directory);
            }
          });
        } else {
          reject(error);
        }
      } else {
        resolve(directory);
      }
    });
  });
}

const directoryPath = `${__dirname}/test`;

createDirectory(directoryPath).then((path) => {
  console.log(`Successfully created directory: '${path}'`);
}).catch((error) => {
  console.log(`Problem creating directory: ${error.message}`)
});

Note:

  • In the beginning of the createDirectory function, I normalize the path to guarantee that the path seperator type of the operating system will be used consistently (e.g. this will turn C:\directory/test into C:\directory\test (when being on Windows)
  • fs.exists is deprecated, that's why I use fs.stat to check if the directory already exists
  • If a directory doesn't exist, the error code will be ENOENT (Error NO ENTry)
  • The directory itself will be created using fs.mkdir
  • I prefer the asynchronous function fs.mkdir over it's blocking counterpart fs.mkdirSync and because of the wrapping Promise it will be guaranteed that the path of the directory will only be returned after the directory has been successfully created
1
  • Thank you for a clean solution that does not involve unnecessary modules. It worked perfectly for me. I wish there were more answers like this!
    – Ken Lyon
    Apr 8, 2019 at 23:29
3

You'd better not to count the filesystem hits while you code in Javascript, in my opinion. However, (1) stat & mkdir and (2) mkdir and check(or discard) the error code, both ways are right ways to do what you want.

2
  • 1
    It's a good way to mkdir a directory or use existing one. I don't see why you don't see. Checking the error code is polite good one, while discarding the error code is just a good one. don't you agree? Dec 4, 2012 at 4:43
  • 1
    I see what's your point. However, I believe that there are many ways to do things right. Thanks. Dec 4, 2012 at 5:02
2

create dynamic name directory for each user... use this code

***suppose email contain user mail address***

var filessystem = require('fs');
var dir = './public/uploads/'+email;

if (!filessystem.existsSync(dir)){
  filessystem.mkdirSync(dir);

}else
{
    console.log("Directory already exist");
}
2

Just as a newer alternative to Teemu Ikonen's answer, which is very simple and easily readable, is to use the ensureDir method of the fs-extra package.

It can not only be used as a blatant replacement for the built in fs module, but also has a lot of other functionalities in addition to the functionalities of the fs package.

The ensureDir method, as the name suggests, ensures that the directory exists. If the directory structure does not exist, it is created. Like mkdir -p. Not just the end folder, instead the entire path is created if not existing already.

the one provided above is the async version of it. It also has a synchronous method to perform this in the form of the ensureDirSync method.

0

You can do all of this with the File System module.

const
  fs = require('fs'),
  dirPath = `path/to/dir`

// Check if directory exists.
fs.access(dirPath, fs.constants.F_OK, (err)=>{
  if (err){
    // Create directory if directory does not exist.
    fs.mkdir(dirPath, {recursive:true}, (err)=>{
      if (err) console.log(`Error creating directory: ${err}`)
      else console.log('Directory created successfully.')
    })
  }
  // Directory now exists.
})

You really don't even need to check if the directory exists. The following code also guarantees that the directory either already exists or is created.

const
  fs = require('fs'),
  dirPath = `path/to/dir`

// Create directory if directory does not exist.
fs.mkdir(dirPath, {recursive:true}, (err)=>{
  if (err) console.log(`Error creating directory: ${err}`)
  // Directory now exists.
})
0

@Liberateur's answer above did not work for me (Node v8.10.0). Little modification did the trick but I am not sure if this is a right way. Please suggest.

// Get modules node
const fs   = require('fs');
const path = require('path');

// Create
function mkdirpath(dirPath)
{
    try {
        fs.accessSync(dirPath, fs.constants.R_OK | fs.constants.W_OK);
    }
    catch(err) {
        try
        {
            fs.mkdirSync(dirPath);
        }
        catch(e)
        {
            mkdirpath(path.dirname(dirPath));
            mkdirpath(dirPath);
        }
    }
}

// Create folder path
mkdirpath('my/new/folder/create');
0
const fs = require('fs');

const folderName = '/Users/joe/test';

try {
  if (!fs.existsSync(folderName)) {
    fs.mkdirSync(folderName);
  }
} catch (err) {
  console.error(err);
}

For documentation and more examples, please see here https://nodejs.dev/learn/working-with-folders-in-nodejs

-1

Raugaral's answer but with -p functionality. Ugly, but it works:

function mkdirp(dir) {
    let dirs = dir.split(/\\/).filter(asdf => !asdf.match(/^\s*$/))
    let fullpath = ''

    // Production directory will begin \\, test is on my local drive.
    if (dirs[0].match(/C:/i)) {
        fullpath = dirs[0] + '\\'
    }
    else {
        fullpath = '\\\\' + dirs[0] + '\\'
    }

    // Start from root directory + 1, build out one level at a time.
    dirs.slice(1).map(asdf => {
        fullpath += asdf + '\\'
        if (!fs.existsSync(fullpath)) {
            fs.mkdirSync(fullpath)
        }
    })
}//mkdirp

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