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What are the differences between a subtype and subclass, and how can I tell whether a class is a subtype/subclass of another class?

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    there are no such things in c++ – user1773602 Dec 4 '12 at 10:32
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C++ refers to a subclass as a "derived class".

In C++, classes are types, and the only "subtypes" are derived classes. So if you choose to use the words "subtype" and "subclass" in connection with C++, they're probably the same thing. Depending on your academic context, I suppose you might say that private inheritance does not create a subtype, in which case they're different. For that matter, in some academic contexts the concept of a "subtype" is not legitimate (formal type theory existed before OOP. For that matter before computer science unless you count Babbage).

In C++11 you can test whether AClass is a derived class of Another (optionally excluding the case where they're the same class):

std::is_base_of<Another, AClass>::value && !std::is_same<Another, AClass>::value

This expression is true even if the inheritance is private.

  • I think "const T*" is a subtype of "T*" – Johannes Schaub - litb Nov 26 '15 at 12:12
  • Then write an answer based on a suitable definition of "subtype" :-) – Steve Jessop Nov 26 '15 at 12:18
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Those are theoretical concepts, not C++ one. But let's see how they can be applied to C++.

  • subclassing refers to the formation of new types by inheriting from another. C++ provides that mechanism and calls subclasses "derived classes".

  • subtyping refers to the possibility to use values of the subtype in places where values of the type are expected. In C++ you can consider that public inheritance implies a subtyping relationship, or you could be more restrictive and consider as subtyping only the cases where the overrides of virtual functions ensure respecting the LSP. And considering that private or protected inheritance doesn't (but still is a case of subclassing) is sane whatever constraints you put or not on virtual function overrides.

So, as usual, the precise definitions -- and I purposefully gave none -- used will accept or exclude some corner cases (private or protected base classes in C++) or even a whole domain (do you consider the constraints that type template parameters have to comply to a typing system or not? if your definitions are open enough to apply to lot of languages, you may end up by answering yes and thus consider that C++ has two typing systems, with interactions. And now consider the effect of explicit specialization on the second.) And precise definitions are usually made in order to ease the rest of the work in which they are proposed.

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From: http://www.cs.princeton.edu/courses/archive/fall98/cs441/mainus/node12.html

There are important differences between subtypes and subclasses in supporting reuse. Subclasses allow one to reuse the code inside classes - both instance variable declarations and method definitions. Thus they are useful in supporting code reuse inside a class. Subtyping on the other hand is useful in supporting reuse externally, giving rise to a form of polymorphism. That is, once a data type is determined to be a subtype of another, any function or procedure that could be applied to elements of the supertype can also be applied to elements of the subtype.

You should read the full article.

  • 3
    Like the commend below the question said, this terminology is not typical in C++ – you shouldn’t use it, you risk confusing people. – Konrad Rudolph Dec 4 '12 at 10:40
  • Especially since C++ isn't "only" object oriented, there's such a thing as templates - which can "apply any function or procedure" to any such type as which supports it, being subtype / subclass of a common base or not. Hence, be careful when trying to apply academic terminology to real life. – DevSolar Dec 4 '12 at 10:58
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Classes are new types defined by programmers, so I think that subclass == subtype.

Steve Jessop wrote:

C++ refers to a subclass as a "derived class".

I think no. Subclass is a class inside class (like Engine is a part of Car).

Look at the example below:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class Car
{
    public:
    class Engine //Engine is subclass
    {
        public:
        static void Start()
        {
               cout << "Engine is starting... \n";
        }      
    };
};

class Animal
{
    public:
    static void Eat()
    {
           cout << "Animal is eating... \n";
    }     
};

class Wolf : Animal //Wolf is derived class
{
      public:
      static void Howl()
      {
             cout << "Wolf is howling... \n";
      }
};

int main()
{
    Car::Engine::Start();
    Animal::Eat();
    Wolf::Howl();

    system("PAUSE"); //keep Console Window open in Debug Mode
    return 0;
}
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    You are confusing with nested classes. – AProgrammer Dec 4 '12 at 12:08
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    I'm sorry. I'm from Poland and I didn't know the word "nested". – David Dec 5 '12 at 13:04

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