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Is there a way to print all records separated by the OFS without typing out each column number.

#Desired style of syntax, undesired result
[kbrandt@glade: ~] echo "1 2 3 4" | gawk 'BEGIN { OFS=" :-( "}; {print $0}'        
1 2 3 4

#Desired result, undesired syntax
[kbrandt@glade: ~] echo "1 2 3 4" | gawk 'BEGIN { OFS=" :-) "}; {print $1,$2,$3,$4}'
1 :-) 2 :-) 3 :-) 4
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This is a variation on the first style:

echo "1 2 3 4" | gawk 'BEGIN { OFS=" :-( "}; {$1=$1; print $0}'

Results:

1 :-( 2 :-( 3 :-( 4

Explanation:

the $1=$1 is to rebuild the record, using the current OFS (you can also see http://www.gnu.org/software/gawk/manual/gawk.html#Changing-Fields)

Update:

(suggested by @EdMorton and @steve) This is a briefer, equivalent version of the awk command, that sets OFS in the command line, and takes advantage of print $0 as the default action:

awk -v OFS=" :-( " '{$1=$1}1'
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  • @steve note: there was one edit that replaced the block {$1=$1; print $0} with just $1=$1. That would fail for $1 == 0. – German Garcia Dec 4 '12 at 15:34
  • @EdMorton that's a perfectly valid alternative (awk -v OFS=" :-( " '{$1=$1}1'. I still like the first version 'cause it's so similar to the OP's (and I don't see any clear advantage of one over the other, mostly a question of style maybe) – German Garcia Dec 4 '12 at 20:40
  • @GermanGarcia: Wasn't that the exact edit that I made? Personally I think awk -v OFS=" :-( " '{$1=$1}1 is clearer, but the only reason I decided to edit was because users won't actually need GNU awk specifically. The command should work of other awks too. If we were trying to make things shorter, we could still go further: awk '{$1=$1}1' OFS=" :-( ". HTH. – Steve Dec 4 '12 at 22:30
  • @GermanGarcia I slightly prefer the briefer version in this case as it re-inforces the concepts of using -v to assign initial values to variables and of "print $0" being the default action which are both things that if you're experienced you'll have no problem understanding and would probably naturally use and if you're inexperienced you really need to get familiar with ASAP so IMHO it had benefits for both experienced and inexperienced awk users. No big deal either way though. – Ed Morton Dec 4 '12 at 23:55
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    @Thor $1=$1;1 will print every line that has a non-zero/null $1 value twice which probably isn't desired. You could do $1=$1,1 but as we discovered recently no-one knows what that means without some investigation so it should be avoided :-). – Ed Morton Dec 5 '12 at 20:58
2

Sed equivalent:

$ echo "1 2 3 4" | sed 's/ /:-)/g'

Here's another option with awk:

$ echo "1 2 3 4" | awk '{ gsub(/\s/, ":-)")}1' 
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  • 1
    Welcome to SO! The question asks about awk specifically. So an answer using sed is out of place here. – cfi Sep 21 '14 at 23:24
  • I think you sed should read sed 's/ / :-) /g' if you notice, the OP had a space around the smiley in the OFS – v010dya Oct 9 '15 at 4:48

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