63

I want to disable cascade deletes for a link table with entity framework code-first. For example, if many users have many roles, and I try to delete a role, I want that delete to be blocked unless there are no users currently associated with that role. I already remove the cascade delete convention in my OnModelCreating:

protected override void OnModelCreating(DbModelBuilder modelBuilder) {
    ...
    modelBuilder.Conventions.Remove<OneToManyCascadeDeleteConvention>();

And then I set up the user-role link table:

modelBuilder.Entity<User>()
    .HasMany(usr => usr.Roles)
    .WithMany(role => role.Users)
    .Map(m => {
        m.ToTable("UsersRoles");
        m.MapLeftKey("UserId");
        m.MapRightKey("RoleId");
    });

Yet when EF creates the database, it creates a delete cascade for the foreign key relationships, eg.

ALTER TABLE [dbo].[UsersRoles]  WITH CHECK ADD  CONSTRAINT [FK_dbo.UsersRoles_dbo.User_UserId] FOREIGN KEY([UserId])
REFERENCES [dbo].[User] ([UserId])
ON DELETE CASCADE
GO

ALTER TABLE [dbo].[UsersRoles]  WITH CHECK ADD  CONSTRAINT [FK_dbo.UsersRoles_dbo.Role_RoleId] FOREIGN KEY([RoleId])
REFERENCES [dbo].[Role] ([RoleId])
ON DELETE CASCADE
GO

How can I stop EF generating this delete cascade?

104

I got the answer. :-) Those cascade deletes were being created because of ManyToManyCascadeDeleteConvention. You need to remove this convention to prevent it from creating cascade deletes for link tables:

modelBuilder.Conventions.Remove<ManyToManyCascadeDeleteConvention>();
  • Thanks this helped me a ton. Curious, did you end up removing BOTH conventions or just the Many to Many convention? – kmehta Jan 31 '13 at 1:06
  • 7
    Actually, I just ended up removing the one-to-many convention and selectively re-enabling it for one or two entities. My notes about it say that, because (unlike one-to-many) you can't use the Fluent API to re-enable cascade delete for a many-to-many by using .WillCascadeOnDelete(true), all the many-to-many tables either have to cascade, or not cascade. I considered having them all cascade as the lesser of the evils, because most of the time, if I delete something linked using a many-to-many link table, I want the things it's linked to to be deleted too. – Jez Jan 31 '13 at 9:56
  • 1
    This didn't seem to work. My problem is when I have two properties of an object of the same type (created by this user and last edited by this user.) I was hoping this would remove the "may cause cycle or multiple cascade paths" error I am getting, but it didn't work. Suggestions? – Rogala Sep 12 '14 at 16:40
  • 14
    I cannot believe that anyone in their right mind would think that cacading deletes were a good default. – Spongman Nov 18 '15 at 1:55
  • 1
    @frozen the 'no action' (failing with error) alternative is a much better alternative than unexpectedly removing data. – Spongman Nov 26 '15 at 6:02
5

I agree with Ebram Khalil that turning it off for a single table is a good option. I like to stick as close to the automatically built migrations as I can, however, so I would set it up in OnModelCreating:

modelBuilder.Entity<User>()
    .HasMany(usr => usr.Roles)
    .WithMany(role => role.Users)
    .Map(m => {
        m.ToTable("UsersRoles");
        m.MapLeftKey("UserId");
        m.MapRightKey("RoleId");
    })
    .WillCascadeOnDelete(false);

I believe this preserves the delete going the other direction, so if both needed to be blocked (makes sense in this example) a similar call would need to be made starting with Entity<User>(Role)

Of course, this comes ages after the question was asked. So it may not have been valid in 2012.

2

I believe that turning off ManyToManyCascadeDeleteConvention globally is not a wise option. Instead, it's better to turn it off only for the concerned table.

This can be achieved through editing the generated migration file, for property cascadeDelete. For example:

AddForeignKey("dbo.UsersRoles", "UserId", "dbo.User", "UserId", cascadeDelete: false);

  • 2
    "I believe that turning off ManyToManyCascadeDeleteConvention globally is not a wise option" why? – Storm Muller Oct 13 '18 at 12:47
  • @StormMuller imho, many-to-many relationship probably means that both entities need to be existed to have a meaningful relationship; hence, if you deleted one, you probably want the other to be deleted. Also, this would make you DB cleaner /less when you want to delete items literally or hard delete. This is not a must case, sometimes you want to just delete the relationship between both entities, but without deleting any of them – ebram khalil Oct 14 '18 at 16:37
  • One-to-one would mean both need to exist and One-to-many means that the "one" data set would have to exist. If it's a many-to-many relationship, that means that if a record is deleted in the one data set, it's children might still be used by other records in the data set. So I have to disagree with you. – Storm Muller Oct 15 '18 at 11:07
  • While I agree with your general advice that it is not wise; there are databases where soft deletes are used (= no actual deleted from the database) and then cascade deletes become pointless and thus it can be a wise decision to not implement them (e.g. to avoid issues with multiple cascade paths). – Flater Mar 5 at 12:57

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