9

I'm writing an ncurses program and am trying to make it respond correctly to terminal resizing. While I can read the terminal dimensions correctly in my program, ncurses doesn't seem to deal with new dimensions correctly. Here's a (somewhat lengthy) sample program:

#include <ncurses.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <signal.h>
#include <sys/ioctl.h>

void handle_winch(int sig){

    struct winsize w;
    ioctl(0, TIOCGWINSZ, &w);
    COLS = w.ws_col;
    LINES = w.ws_row;

    wresize(stdscr, LINES, COLS);
    clear();

    mvprintw(0, 0, "COLS = %d, LINES = %d", COLS, LINES);
    for (int i = 0; i < COLS; i++)
        mvaddch(1, i, '*');

    refresh();
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[]){

    initscr();

    struct sigaction sa;
    memset(&sa, 0, sizeof(struct sigaction));
    sa.sa_handler = handle_winch;
    sigaction(SIGWINCH, &sa, NULL);

    while(getch() != 27) {}

    endwin();
    return 0;
}

If you run it, you can see that the terminal dimensions are correctly retrieved. But the second line, which is supposed to draw *-characters across the screen, doesn't work. Try resizing the window horizontally to make it larger, the line of *s will not get larger.

What's the problem here? I'm aware that one can temporarily leave curses mode, but I'd prefer a cleaner solution. Thanks!

17

Do not set COLS and LINES. These are managed by ncurses. Also, let ncurses reinitialize properly after a resize. That means, don't call wresize(). Just call endwin() instead. Make sure to call refresh() directly after an endwin() call before using other ncurses functions.

You also don't need the ioctl() at all. ncurses takes care of detecting the new size automatically.

So what you need is pretty much just an endwin() call:

void handle_winch(int sig)
{
    endwin();
    // Needs to be called after an endwin() so ncurses will initialize
    // itself with the new terminal dimensions.
    refresh();
    clear();

    mvprintw(0, 0, "COLS = %d, LINES = %d", COLS, LINES);
    for (int i = 0; i < COLS; i++)
        mvaddch(1, i, '*');
    refresh();
}

Furthermore, some ncurses versions are configured to supply their own SIGWINCH handler. Those versions return KEY_RESIZE as a key input when a resize occurs. If you were to make use of that, you wouldn't need a signal handler at all. Instead, all you need is:

#include <ncurses.h>
#include <string.h>

int main()
{

    initscr();

    int key;
    while ((key = getch()) != 27) {
        if (key == KEY_RESIZE) {
            clear();
            mvprintw(0, 0, "COLS = %d, LINES = %d", COLS, LINES);
            for (int i = 0; i < COLS; i++)
                mvaddch(1, i, '*');
            refresh();
        }
    }

    endwin();
    return 0;
}

Unfortunately, you can't rely on all ncurses installation being configured with KEY_RESIZE, so the signal handler is the most portable solution.

| improve this answer | |
  • @ryyst I added information on KEY_RESIZE too, in case you want to go that route. – Nikos C. Dec 4 '12 at 17:01
  • 1
    ncurses has resizeterm(lines,cols) if you don't want to use KEY_RESIZE, but it is an ncurses extension as well. – Craig Dec 5 '12 at 18:58
  • @ryyst ... the problem can be solved by calling doupdate() upon receiving a KEY_ERR. – ryyst Dec 8 '12 at 11:41
  • @NikosC. I'm wondering how this signal-reliant code would perform in an ncurses application utilizing use_window to perform synchronized window updates? I.e., is there a way to make this thread-safe? – g33kz0r Mar 26 '13 at 3:33
  • 3
    Let me reiterate what @NikosC. said, when handling SIGWINCH you must call endwin() followed by refresh(). Only calling endwin() is going to leave the getmaxyx variables in an undefined state. – Joe Jan 15 '16 at 23:46

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