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The short question is, what should a shell do if it is in an orphaned process group that doesn't own the tty? But I recommend reading the long question because it's amusing.

Here is a fun and exciting way to turn your laptop into a portable space heater, using your favorite shell (unless you're one of those tcsh weirdos):

#include <unistd.h>   
int main(void) {
    if (fork() == 0) {
        execl("/bin/bash", "/bin/bash", NULL);
    }
    return 0;
}

This causes bash to peg the CPU at 100%. zsh and fish do the same, while ksh and tcsh mumble something about job control and then keel over, which is a bit better, but not much. Oh, and it's a platform agnostic offender: OS X and Linux are both affected.

My (potentially wrong) explanation is as follows: the child shell detects it is not in the foreground: tcgetpgrp(0) != getpgrp(). Therefore it tries to stop itself: killpg(getpgrp(), SIGTTIN). But its process group is orphaned, because its parent (the C program) was the leader and died, and SIGTTIN sent to an orphaned process group is just dropped (otherwise nothing could start it again). Therefore, the child shell is not stopped, but it's still in the background, so it does it all again, right away. Rinse and repeat.

My question is, how can a command line shell detect this scenario, and what is the right thing for it to do? My thought is that the shell tries to read from stdin, and just exits if read gives it EIO.

Thanks for your thoughts!

Edit: I tried doing a zero-length read() on /dev/tty, and that succeeded, which is bad. To get the EIO, I actually have to be prepared to read some data off of /dev/tty.

Edit: Another thought I had was to kill(getpgrp(), 0). If the process group is orphaned, then I believe this will always fail. However, it may also fail because I don't have permission to signal the session leader.

Edit: For anyone finding this later, what I ended up doing is described at https://github.com/fish-shell/fish-shell/issues/422 . Also, how's the future?

8
  • 5
    +1 for the portable space heater remark. I giggled ;) Dec 5, 2012 at 8:00
  • 2
    will best suite on unix.stackexchange.com
    – mtk
    Dec 10, 2012 at 17:33
  • 1
    @Will How is this not a programming question? Dec 30, 2012 at 0:56
  • Not sure what you expected here, but this seems legit. If you fork off infinite threads, you eventually consume all the CPU. A zero-length read is essentially a no-op. To the question in the title, a process without a tty that tries to read or write to a tty will behave poorly since its filehandle is no longer valid. Usually this means it will crash, but in some cases it can clobber something important.
    – saarp
    Jan 1, 2013 at 1:30
  • @saarp - what infinite threads? There is no loop here. Just a single fork of a shell process that inexplicably consumes the CPU when its parent exits.
    – Mark Reed
    Jan 4, 2013 at 14:14

1 Answer 1

3

Here's what strace says is happening:

--- SIGTTIN (Stopped (tty input)) @ 0 (0) ---
rt_sigaction(SIGTTIN, {SIG_IGN, [], SA_RESTORER, 0x7fd5f6989d80}, {SIG_DFL, [], SA_RESTORER, 0x7fd5f6989d80}, 8) = 0
ioctl(255, TIOCGPGRP, [9954])           = 0
rt_sigaction(SIGTTIN, {SIG_DFL, [], SA_RESTORER, 0x7fd5f6989d80}, {SIG_IGN, [], SA_RESTORER, 0x7fd5f6989d80}, 8) = 0
kill(0, SIGTTIN)                        = 0
--- SIGTTIN (Stopped (tty input)) @ 0 (0) ---
rt_sigaction(SIGTTIN, {SIG_IGN, [], SA_RESTORER, 0x7fd5f6989d80}, {SIG_DFL, [], SA_RESTORER, 0x7fd5f6989d80}, 8) = 0
ioctl(255, TIOCGPGRP, [9954])           = 0
rt_sigaction(SIGTTIN, {SIG_DFL, [], SA_RESTORER, 0x7fd5f6989d80}, {SIG_IGN, [], SA_RESTORER, 0x7fd5f6989d80}, 8) = 0
kill(0, SIGTTIN)                        = 0
[repeat...]

and here is why, from jobs.c, bash 4.2:

  while ((terminal_pgrp = tcgetpgrp (shell_tty)) != -1)
    {
      if (shell_pgrp != terminal_pgrp)
        {
          SigHandler *ottin;

          ottin = set_signal_handler(SIGTTIN, SIG_DFL);
          kill (0, SIGTTIN);
          set_signal_handler (SIGTTIN, ottin);
          continue;
        } 
      break;
    } 

Concerning what to do about it...well that's beyond my ability. But, I thought this was useful information, and a bit much for a comment.

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