62

Suppose we are only given

var obj = {};
var propName = "foo.bar.foobar";

How can we set the property obj.foo.bar.foobar to a certain value (say "hello world")? So I want to achieve this, while we only have the property name in a string:

obj.foo.bar.foobar = "hello world";
2

16 Answers 16

92
function assign(obj, prop, value) {
    if (typeof prop === "string")
        prop = prop.split(".");

    if (prop.length > 1) {
        var e = prop.shift();
        assign(obj[e] =
                 Object.prototype.toString.call(obj[e]) === "[object Object]"
                 ? obj[e]
                 : {},
               prop,
               value);
    } else
        obj[prop[0]] = value;
}

var obj = {},
    propName = "foo.bar.foobar";

assign(obj, propName, "Value");
14
  • 1
    Yep, this one also appears to work when the path doesn't exist yet.
    – chtenb
    Dec 5, 2012 at 9:27
  • Why do you check for the typeof prop? You continue the function flow anyways. Dec 5, 2012 at 9:39
  • @StephanBönnemann, if it's not a string, we're in the iteration when we need to set the property with obj[prop[0]] = value;
    – Cerbrus
    Dec 5, 2012 at 9:42
  • @StephanBönnemann Not sure what you mean. This is added to make the solution univeral, so that we can pass either array or string as prop.
    – VisioN
    Dec 5, 2012 at 9:43
  • 1
    This doesn't work with arrays. template[0].item[0].format.color
    – Demodave
    Aug 7, 2018 at 18:59
15

I know it's an old one, but I see only custom functions in answers.
If you don't mind using a library, look at lodash _.set and _.get function.

12

Since this question appears to be answered by incorrect answers, I'll just refer to the correct answer from a similar question

function setDeepValue(obj, value, path) {
    if (typeof path === "string") {
        var path = path.split('.');
    }

    if(path.length > 1){
        var p=path.shift();
        if(obj[p]==null || typeof obj[p]!== 'object'){
             obj[p] = {};
        }
        setDeepValue(obj[p], value, path);
    }else{
        obj[path[0]] = value;
    }
}

Use:

var obj = {};
setDeepValue(obj, 'Hello World', 'foo.bar.foobar');
9
  • 3
    Hm. Your answer looks like an exact copy of mine :)
    – VisioN
    Dec 5, 2012 at 9:41
  • It looks like I left out a = in the typeof. But frankly, typeof is the only way to make sure you're not trying to split a object, one of the things I ran into. For the rest, it's simple recursion.
    – Cerbrus
    Dec 5, 2012 at 9:44
  • 1
    What if I call it twice with foo.bar.foobar and foo.bar2.foobar2? Dec 5, 2012 at 10:05
  • In that case, it did reset obj.foo, when setting foo.bar2.foobar2. Edited the code. Whoops, didn't see your suggested edit, fixing.
    – Cerbrus
    Dec 5, 2012 at 10:10
  • @Cerbrus one more thing. If obj.foo.bar is assigned a value and then I try to setDeepValue foo.bar.foobar it it fails with an error (unless the value was boolean false). Probably the most safe way is to test if obj[p] is an object. If not an object, replace it with {}. As null is an object, the correct test should be if(obj[p]!=null && typeof obj[p]=== 'object') Dec 5, 2012 at 10:31
5

edit: I've created a jsPerf.com testcase to compare the accepted answer with my version. Turns out that my version is faster, especially when you go very deep.

http://jsfiddle.net/9YMm8/

var nestedObjectAssignmentFor = function(obj, propString, value) {
    var propNames = propString.split('.'),
        propLength = propNames.length-1,
        tmpObj = obj;

    for (var i = 0; i <= propLength ; i++) {
        tmpObj = tmpObj[propNames[i]] = i !== propLength ?  {} : value;  
    }
    return obj;
}

var obj = nestedObjectAssignment({},"foo.bar.foobar","hello world");

4
  • This appears to be slightly slower in Chrome than the proposed recursion function. However, It's significantly faster in IE / FF. (Still, Chrome has the most iterations / second, V8 being a beast with JavaScript execution)
    – Cerbrus
    Dec 5, 2012 at 9:59
  • @Cerbrus appears that it depends on the browser, created the testcase myself jsperf.com/nested-object-assignment Dec 5, 2012 at 10:02
  • 1
    Code performance testing 101: Don't initialize your functions for every iteration
    – Cerbrus
    Dec 5, 2012 at 10:03
  • Only works with empty first argument objects, otherwise it overwrite the original object data.
    – art
    Sep 20, 2016 at 17:27
4

All solutions overid any of the original data when setting so I have tweaked with the following, made it into a single object too:

 var obj = {}
 nestObject.set(obj, "a.b", "foo"); 
 nestObject.get(obj, "a.b"); // returns foo     

 var nestedObject = {
     set: function(obj, propString, value) {
         var propNames = propString.split('.'),
             propLength = propNames.length-1,
             tmpObj = obj;
         for (var i = 0; i <= propLength ; i++) {
             if (i === propLength){
                 if(tmpObj[propNames[i]]){
                     tmpObj[propNames[i]] = value;
                 }else{
                     tmpObj[propNames[i]] = value;
                 }
             }else{
                 if(tmpObj[propNames[i]]){
                     tmpObj = tmpObj[propNames[i]];
                 }else{
                     tmpObj = tmpObj[propNames[i]] = {};
                 }
             }
         }
         return obj;
     },
     get: function(obj, propString){
         var propNames = propString.split('.'),
             propLength = propNames.length-1,
             tmpObj = obj;
         for (var i = 0; i <= propLength ; i++) {
             if(tmpObj[propNames[i]]){
                 tmpObj = tmpObj[propNames[i]];
             }else{
                 break;
             }
         }
         return tmpObj;
     }
 };

Can also change functions to be an Oject.prototype method changing obj param to this:

Object.prototype = { setNested = function(){ ... }, getNested = function(){ ... } } 

{}.setNested('a.c','foo') 
3

Here is a get and set function i just compiled from a couple of threads + some custom code.

It will also create keys that don't exist on set.

function setValue(object, path, value) {
    var a = path.split('.');
    var o = object;
    for (var i = 0; i < a.length - 1; i++) {
        var n = a[i];
        if (n in o) {
            o = o[n];
        } else {
            o[n] = {};
            o = o[n];
        }
    }
    o[a[a.length - 1]] = value;
}

function getValue(object, path) {
    var o = object;
    path = path.replace(/\[(\w+)\]/g, '.$1');
    path = path.replace(/^\./, '');
    var a = path.split('.');
    while (a.length) {
        var n = a.shift();
        if (n in o) {
            o = o[n];
        } else {
            return;
        }
    }
    return o;
}
1
  • 1
    I like this one because it does array index also, e.g. "property[3]". However, to get setValue to work like that we must also add "path = path.replace(/[(\w+)]/g, '.$1');" to the setValue method.
    – Etherman
    Dec 3, 2018 at 18:25
3

Here is a simple function to do that using reference.

    function setValueByPath (obj, path, value) {
        var ref = obj;

        path.split('.').forEach(function (key, index, arr) {
            ref = ref[key] = index === arr.length - 1 ? value : {};
        });

        return obj;
    }
3

You could split the path and make a check if the following element exist. If not assign an object to the new property.

Return then the value of the property.

At the end assign the value.

function setValue(object, path, value) {
    var fullPath = path.split('.'),
        way = fullPath.slice(),
        last = way.pop();

    way.reduce(function (r, a) {
        return r[a] = r[a] || {};
    }, object)[last] = value;
}

var object = {},
    propName = 'foo.bar.foobar',
    value = 'hello world';

setValue(object, propName, value);
console.log(object);

3

Here's one that returns the updated object

function deepUpdate(value, path, tree, branch = tree) {
  const last = path.length === 1;
  branch[path[0]] = last ? value : branch[path[0]];
  return last ? tree : deepUpdate(value, path.slice(1), tree, branch[path[0]]);
}

const path = 'cat.dog';
const updated = deepUpdate('a', path.split('.'), {cat: {dog: null}})
// => { cat: {dog: 'a'} }
3

A very straightforward one.

This implementation should be very performant. It avoids recursions, and function calls, while maintaining simplicity.

/**
 * Set the value of a deep property, creating new objects as necessary.
 * @param {Object} obj The object to set the value on.
 * @param {String|String[]} path The property to set.
 * @param {*} value The value to set.
 * @return {Object} The object at the end of the path.
 * @author github.com/victornpb
 * @see https://stackoverflow.com/a/46060952/938822
 * @example
 * setDeep(obj, 'foo.bar.baz', 'quux');
 */
function setDeep(obj, path, value) {
    const props = typeof path === 'string' ? path.split('.') : path;
    for (var i = 0, n = props.length - 1; i < n; ++i) {
        obj = obj[props[i]] = obj[props[i]] || {};
    }
    obj[props[i]] = value;
    return obj;
}
  
  

/*********************** EXAMPLE ***********************/

const obj = {
    hello : 'world',
};

setDeep(obj, 'root', true);
setDeep(obj, 'foo.bar.baz', 1);
setDeep(obj, ['foo','quux'], '😉');

console.log(obj);
// ⬇︎ Click "Run" below to see output

2
  • Should support setting of deep arrays: setDeep(obj, 'foo.bar.baz[0]', 1);
    – vsync
    Aug 8, 2022 at 10:11
  • @vsync I sets values inside arrays, but if the array doesn't exist it assumes object creation, and threats the index as a key.
    – Vitim.us
    Sep 13, 2022 at 21:12
1

I was looking for an answer that does not overwrite existing values and was easily readable and was able to come up with this. Leaving this here in case it helps others with the same needs

function setValueAtObjectPath(obj, pathString, newValue) {
  // create an array (pathComponents) of the period-separated path components from pathString
  var pathComponents = pathString.split('.');
  // create a object (tmpObj) that references the memory of obj
  var tmpObj = obj;

  for (var i = 0; i < pathComponents.length; i++) {
    // if not on the last path component, then set the tmpObj as the value at this pathComponent
    if (i !== pathComponents.length-1) {
      // set tmpObj[pathComponents[i]] equal to an object of it's own value
      tmpObj[pathComponents[i]] = {...tmpObj[pathComponents[i]]}
      // set tmpObj to reference tmpObj[pathComponents[i]]
      tmpObj = tmpObj[pathComponents[i]]
    // else (IS the last path component), then set the value at this pathComponent equal to newValue 
    } else {
      // set tmpObj[pathComponents[i]] equal to newValue
      tmpObj[pathComponents[i]] = newValue
    }
  }
  // return your object
  return obj
}
1

Same as Rbar's answers, very useful when you're working with redux reducers. I use lodash clone instead of spread operator to support arrays too:

export function cloneAndPatch(obj, path, newValue, separator='.') {
    let stack = Array.isArray(path) ? path : path.split(separator);
    let newObj = _.clone(obj);

    obj = newObj;

    while (stack.length > 1) {
        let property = stack.shift();
        let sub = _.clone(obj[property]);

        obj[property] = sub;
        obj = sub;
    }

    obj[stack.shift()] = newValue;

    return newObj;
}
1

Here's a simple method that uses a scoped Object that recursively set's the correct prop by path.

function setObjectValueByPath(pathScope, value, obj) {
  const pathStrings = pathScope.split('/');
  obj[pathStrings[0]] = pathStrings.length > 1 ?
    setObjectValueByPath(
      pathStrings.splice(1, pathStrings.length).join('/'),
      value,
      obj[pathStrings[0]]
    ) :
    value;
  return obj;
}
0
Object.getPath = function(o, s) {
    s = s.replace(/\[(\w+)\]/g, '.$1'); // convert indexes to properties
    s = s.replace(/^\./, '');           // strip a leading dot
    var a = s.split('.');
    for (var i = 0, n = a.length; i < n; ++i) {
        var k = a[i];
        if (k in o) {
            o = o[k];
        } else {
            return;
        }
    }
    return o;
};

Object.setPath = function(o, p, v) {
    var a = p.split('.');
    var o = o;
    for (var i = 0; i < a.length - 1; i++) {
        if (a[i].indexOf('[') === -1) {
            var n = a[i];
            if (n in o) {
                o = o[n];
            } else {
                o[n] = {};
                o = o[n];
            }
        } else {
            // Not totaly optimised
            var ix = a[i].match(/\[.*?\]/g)[0];
            var n = a[i].replace(ix, '');
            o = o[n][ix.substr(1,ix.length-2)]
        }
    }

    if (a[a.length - 1].indexOf('[') === -1) {
        o[a[a.length - 1]] = v;
    } else {
        var ix = a[a.length - 1].match(/\[.*?\]/g)[0];
        var n = a[a.length - 1].replace(ix, '');
        o[n][ix.substr(1,ix.length-2)] = v;
    }
};
0

You can use reduce : (you can test it by copy/paste on browser console)

const setValueOf = (obj, value, ...path) => {
    path.reduce((o, level, idx) => {
        if(idx === path.length -1) { o[level] = value }; // on last change the value of the prop
        return o && o[level]; // return the prop
    }, obj);
};

Example

let objExmp = {a: 'a', b: {b1: 'b1', b2: 'b2', b3: { b3_3 : 'default_value' } }};

setValueOf(objExmp, 'new_value' , 'b', 'b3', 'b3_3');
console.log('objExmp', objExmp); // prop changed to 'new_value'

You can split the string path by '.' and spread like :

setValueOf(objExmp, 'new_value' , ...'b.b3.b3_3'.split('.'));
-1

How about a simple and short one?

Object.assign(this.origin, { [propName]: value })

4
  • This will create a property named "foo.bar.foobar" on this.origin, not a property named foobar on bar on foo on this.origin. In other words, JSON.stringify(this.origin) will output {"foo.bar.foobar":value}, not {foo:{bar:{foobar:value}}} as was desired. Feb 8 at 22:36
  • Sure it will not var origin = {}; Object.assign(origin, { ['foo']: {['bar']: {['foobar']: 'value'}} }) JSON.stringify(origin) Output: {"foo":{"bar":{"foobar":"value"}}} Mar 7 at 14:17
  • 1
    Read the question again: var obj = {}; var propName = "foo.bar.foobar"; Nothing about this.origin, no { foo: { bar: { foobar: 'value } } }. This "simple and short one" works fine, for a completely different set of starting parameters, just not the ones from this question. Mar 7 at 14:46
  • Sure you are right, this was just an idea. And 2 years old btw Mar 8 at 15:04

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