36

In Unity, whats a good way to create a singleton game manager that can be accessed everywhere as a global class with static variables that will spit the same constant values to every class that pulls those values? And what would be the way to implement it in Unity? Do I have to attach it to a GameObject? Can it just be there in a folder without being in the scene visually?

  • 2
    See the wiki about Singleton – cregox Sep 18 '13 at 20:00
  • It should be noted somewhere that static variables and singletons by nature survive scene transitions and should therfore be treated with care in this regard – SanBen Dec 4 '15 at 10:15
  • You can't use singletons in Unity. It's a basic of game engines and so-called "ECS" systems (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entity_component_system). MonoBehaviors are meaningless unless they are a Component "attached" to a GameObject. Everything in a game engine scene is a "singleton", an instantiated object. There's only one "lara croft" in the game scene. If you happen to need a MonoBehavior that exists from scene to scene, just make it persistent with DontDestroyOnLoad, from your preload scene. – Fattie Feb 20 '16 at 14:00
  • It's literally this simple ... stackoverflow.com/questions/37276811/… It's one line of code SoundEffects soundEffects = Object.FindObjectOfType<SoundEffects>(); It's just a non-issue. – Fattie May 29 '16 at 18:02
  • This unitygeek.com/unity_c_singleton blog explain very well about singleton manager classes – Rahul Lalit Aug 6 '16 at 11:27
47

Like always: it depends. I use singletons of both kinds, components attached to GameObject and standalone classes not derived from MonoBehaviour. IMO the overall question is how are instances bound to the lifcycle of scenes, game objects, ... And not to forget sometimes it is more convenient to have a component especially referencing other MonoBehaviour objects is easier and safer.

  1. There are classes that just need to provide some values like for example a config class that needs to load settings from persistence layer when called. I design theese classes as simple singletons.
  2. On the other hand some objects need to know when a scene is started i.e. Start is called or have to perform actions in Update or other methods. Then I implement them as component and attach them to a game object that survives loading new scenes.

I designed component based singletons (type 2) with two parts: a persistent GameObject called Main, which holds all components and a flat singleton (type 1) called MainComponentManager for managing it. Some demo code:

public class MainComponentManger {
    private static MainComponentManger instance;
    public static void CreateInstance () {
        if (instance == null) {
            instance = new MainComponentManger ();
            GameObject go = GameObject.Find ("Main");
            if (go == null) {
                go = new GameObject ("Main");
                instance.main = go;
                // important: make game object persistent:
                Object.DontDestroyOnLoad (go);
            }
            // trigger instantiation of other singletons
            Component c = MenuManager.SharedInstance;
            // ...
        }
    }

    GameObject main;

    public static MainComponentManger SharedInstance {
        get {
            if (instance == null) {
                CreateInstance ();
            }
            return instance;
        }
    }

    public static T AddMainComponent <T> () where T : UnityEngine.Component {
        T t = SharedInstance.main.GetComponent<T> ();
        if (t != null) {
            return t;
        }
        return SharedInstance.main.AddComponent <T> ();
    }

Now other singletons that want to register as Main component just look like:

public class AudioManager : MonoBehaviour {
    private static AudioManager instance = null;
    public static AudioManager SharedInstance {
        get {
            if (instance == null) {
                instance = MainComponentManger.AddMainComponent<AudioManager> ();
            }
            return instance;
        }
    }
  • Thank you so much for such a thorough and knowledgeable answer. Definitely got more then I expected. Cheers!! I'll gladly vote up this answer as soon as I get 15+ reputation points. :) – DeviArt Dec 5 '12 at 22:27
  • 1
    @RobertNoack thanks, I added the declaration. See updated answer. – Kay May 5 '14 at 8:09
  • I don't see why one have to use GameObject types for this. For example, couldn't the member "main" just be a normal container instead, for example a generic List? Also, MainComponentManger.instance is static so it will have application scope, and don't need to be stored by a GameObject with DontDestroyOnLoad set. – shadow_map Jul 30 '14 at 7:03
  • @MikeMegally Some people consider singletons as an anti-pattern and yes in large projects I would rather avoid them – Kay Jul 30 '14 at 7:03
  • 1
    To summarize, the script presented above happens to "make a game object". ie it's a script that saves you the trouble of clicking "new game object". It has no connection to singletons since you can't have a singleton MonoBehavior, it's meaningless. – Fattie Feb 26 '16 at 15:40
3

Engineers who are new to Unity often don't notice that

you can't have a "singleton" in an ECS system.

It is meaningless.

All you have in Unity is GameObjects, at, XYZ positions. They can have components attached.

It would be like trying to have "a singleton" or "inheritance" in .... Photoshop or Microsoft Word.

Photoshop file - pixels at XY positions
Text editor file - letters at X positions
Unity file - GameObjects at XYZ positions

It is "just that simple".

So, in a game you will have "general" behaviors where there is only "one" of the thing. (So obviously there is only "one sound effects engine" , "one screen", "one scoring system" and so on.) A normal programmer would think of those as "singletons", but Unity just has nothing to do with singletons and no connection to singletons.

So if you have "a tank" or "a tree" of course it's normal you may have dozens of those things. But "the sound effects engine" or "the networking system" are "general, only-one-of-them" systems.

Hence, trivially, in Unity "the sound effects engine" or "the networking system" very simply sits on a game object, and, you (obviously) just have the one of them.

Those "general, only-one-of-them" items just sit on the preload scene.

You absolutely have to have a preload scene anyway, in every Unity project.

(Simple how-to: https://stackoverflow.com/a/35891919/294884 )

In the future Unity will include a "built-in preload scene" - when that day comes this will finally never be discussed again!

(Note - some of the languages you use to compile Components for Unity of course have OO concepts; but Unity itself has no connection to OO at all. Unity is like photoshop. You have "game objects" each at a certain 3D position.)

(Note - in the early days of Unity you'd see attempts at making code, say c#, which creates a game object on the fly, attempts to keep the game object unique, and "attaches itself" to the game object as a component. Apart from being completely bizarre/pointless, just FWIW it's theoretically not possible to ensure uniqueness (actually not even within a single frame). Again, it's moot because in Unity general behaviors just go on the preload scene.)

2

If this class is just for accessing global variables then you don't really need a singleton pattern for this, or use a GameObject.

Simply create a class with public static members.

public class Globals
{
    public static int mStatic1 = 0;
    public static float mStatic2 = 0.0f;
    // ....etc
}

The other solutions are fine but overkill if all you need is global access to variables.

  • Hi UnityQA. I'm sorry but what you've said doesn't make sense to me - it's very possible, and in many projects does actually happen, and is very useful. You obviously have a specific scenario in mind, but if I did want a "true" singleton I most likely wouldn't inherit from MonoBehaviour (which has issues around managing the lifetime of the GameObject .) – LITM Jul 28 '16 at 23:30
  • I appreciate the passion in the answer * no sarcasm * but I'm still not sure why you are ranting at me. Like I said, if I do build a Singleton it's probably not going to inherit from MonoBehaviour, but why differentiate Unity(which is just a Framework) from the C# environment (or whatever language)? If I use a static it's a class variable, so there is only one instance of that variable regardless of its use in a MonoBehaviour derived class. This is why it's in the language. End of story. – LITM Aug 1 '16 at 0:15
  • As LITM says "If this class is just for accessing global variables..." of course just do this. In terms of the QA at hand, how do you access "globally-needed" monobehaviours in Unity (example, your sound effects etc); of course you just trivially put them on a preload scene (where else could they possibly be? they have to be loaded first) and marked DDOL – Fattie Nov 5 '16 at 15:43
1

I wrote a singleton class that makes easy to create singleton objects. Its is a MonoBehaviour script, so you can use the Coroutines. Its based on this Unity Wiki article, and I will add option to create it from Prefab later.

So you don't need to write the Singleton codes. Just download this Singleton.cs Base Class, add it to your project, and create your singleton extending it:

public class MySingleton : Singleton<MySingleton> {
  protected MySingleton () {} // Protect the constructor!

  public string globalVar;

  void Awake () {
      Debug.Log("Awoke Singleton Instance: " + gameObject.GetInstanceID());
  }
}

Now your MySingleton class is a singleton, and you can call it by Instance:

MySingleton.Instance.globalVar = "A";
Debug.Log ("globalVar: " + MySingleton.Instance.globalVar);

Here is a complete tutorial: http://www.bivis.com.br/2016/05/04/unity-reusable-singleton-tutorial/

  • There's no such thing as a "singleton object" in Unity. The concept is utterly meaningless. A Unity scene is just "game objects" (example, a tree, Lara Croft, one cloud, a tank, etc). The concept of a "singleton" in Unity is completely, totally meaningless. – Fattie Jul 13 '20 at 1:38
0

This is the setup I have created.

First create this script:

MonoBehaviourUtility.cs

using UnityEngine;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.IO;

static public class MonoBehaviourUtility 
{

    static public T GetManager<T>( ref T manager ) where T : MonoBehaviour
    {
        if (manager == null)
        {
            manager = (T)GameObject.FindObjectOfType( typeof( T ) );
            if (manager == null)
            {
                GameObject gameObject = new GameObject( typeof( T ).ToString() );
                manager = (T)gameObject.AddComponent( typeof( T ) );
            }
        }
        return manager;
    }

}

Then in any class you want to be a singleton do this:

public class ExampleManager : MonoBehaviour 
{   
    static public ExampleManager sharedManager 
    {
        get 
        {
            return MonoBehaviourUtility.GetManager<ExampleManager>( ref _sharedManager );
        }
    }   
    static private ExampleManager _sharedManager;       
}
  • regarding schemes to "automatically create a game object and attach a MonoBehavior to it ... automatically". (I guess to ... avoid clicking to create a game object?) What happens if you end up with a couple of game objects, each with the Component in question on it? Even if (for some reason) one tried to pull off the "automatic game object" idea, you would have to attend to a dozen points, such as checking for racetrack, multiples, etc. And really it would have to be an the Editor-script level, if the (totally bizarre) concept is "ensure the developer(s) do not have more than one of thing X". – Fattie Feb 20 '16 at 14:26
  • 1
    I would actually no longer personally endorse use of singletons in Unity. – rygo6 Feb 21 '16 at 1:24
  • 1
    That's because you ROCK – Fattie Feb 21 '16 at 2:01
0

Here is a simple code taken from Unity Tutorial. for better understanding open the link

using System.Collections.Generic;       //Allows us to use Lists. 

public class GameManager : MonoBehaviour
{

    public static GameManager instance = null;              //Static instance of GameManager which allows it to be accessed by any other script.
    private BoardManager boardScript;                       //Store a reference to our BoardManager which will set up the level.
    private int level = 3;                                  //Current level number, expressed in game as "Day 1".

    //Awake is always called before any Start functions
    void Awake()
    {
        //Check if instance already exists
        if (instance == null)

            //if not, set instance to this
            instance = this;

        //If instance already exists and it's not this:
        else if (instance != this)

            //Then destroy this. This enforces our singleton pattern, meaning there can only ever be one instance of a GameManager.
            Destroy(gameObject);    

        //Sets this to not be destroyed when reloading scene
        DontDestroyOnLoad(gameObject);

        //Get a component reference to the attached BoardManager script
        boardScript = GetComponent<BoardManager>();

        //Call the InitGame function to initialize the first level 
        InitGame();
    }

    //Initializes the game for each level.
    void InitGame()
    {
        //Call the SetupScene function of the BoardManager script, pass it current level number.
        boardScript.SetupScene(level);

    }



    //Update is called every frame.
    void Update()
    {

    }
-1

One way to do it is to make a scene just to initialize your game manager like this:

public class GameManager : MonoBehaviour {
    static GameManager instance;

    //other codes

    void Awake() {
        DontDestroyOnLoad(transform.gameObject);
        instance = this;
    }

    //other codes
}

That's it, that's all you need to do. And then immediately after initializing the game manager, load the next scene and never come back to this scene again.

Have a look at this tutorial: https://youtu.be/64uOVmQ5R1k?list=WL

Edit: Changed GameManager static instance; to static GameManager instance;

  • Answers should not be just links to outside websites. – xpereta May 5 '15 at 14:48
  • Line 2 is very much invalid C# and won't compile. – Fanus du Toit Feb 4 '19 at 0:03
-1

Instead of creating one singleton for each class. I would suggest you to create a generic class for singleton. i use to follow this method which make my life very easy.

For More detail visit here

Or

Create Unity C# class in unity and use following code

/// <summary>
/// Inherit from this base class to create a singleton.
/// e.g. public class MyClassName : Singleton<MyClassName> {}
/// </summary>
public class Singleton<T> : MonoBehaviour where T : MonoBehaviour
{
    // Check to see if we're about to be destroyed.
    private static bool m_ShuttingDown = false;
    private static object m_Lock = new object();
    private static T m_Instance;

    /// <summary>
    /// Access singleton instance through this propriety.
    /// </summary>
    public static T Instance
    {
        get
        {
            if (m_ShuttingDown)
            {
                Debug.LogWarning("[Singleton] Instance '" + typeof(T) +
                    "' already destroyed. Returning null.");
                return null;
            }

            lock (m_Lock)
            {
                if (m_Instance == null)
                {
                    // Search for existing instance.
                    m_Instance = (T)FindObjectOfType(typeof(T));

                    // Create new instance if one doesn't already exist.
                    if (m_Instance == null)
                    {
                        // Need to create a new GameObject to attach the singleton to.
                        var singletonObject = new GameObject();
                        m_Instance = singletonObject.AddComponent<T>();
                        singletonObject.name = typeof(T).ToString() + " (Singleton)";

                        // Make instance persistent.
                        DontDestroyOnLoad(singletonObject);
                    }
                }

                return m_Instance;
         }
      }
  }

  private void OnApplicationQuit()
  {
     m_ShuttingDown = true;
  }

  private void OnDestroy()
  {
    m_ShuttingDown = true;
  }
}

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