14

I have a class ClassToTest which has a dependency on ClassToMock.

public class ClassToMock {

  private static final String MEMBER_1 = FileReader.readMemeber1();

  protected void someMethod() {
    ...
  }
}

The unit test case for ClassToTest.

public class ClassToTestTest {
  private ClassToMock _mock;

  @Before
  public void setUp() throws Exception {
     _mock = mock(ClassToMock.class)
  }

}

When mock is called in the setUp() method, FileReader.readMemeber1(); is executed. Is there a way to avoid this? I think one way is to initialize the MEMBER_1 inside a method. Any other alternatives?

Thanks!

4
  • 4
    I think that there are tools that allow you to mock out static variables, but they involve a lot of hacks. Because this class is difficult to test, listen to what the tests are trying to tell you, and make your class more loosely coupled to FileReader. – Kenrick Chien Dec 5 '12 at 19:49
  • Question: Is your concern just that FileReader.readMember is executed (i.e. that unit tests shouldn't hit the file system), or are you also wanting different tests to have different values for MEMBER_1? – Daryn Dec 5 '12 at 23:16
  • Yes. I dont want FileReader.readMember to be executed. It is another dependency. – pkrish Dec 6 '12 at 3:27
  • @pkrish I add another step in my answer, this should solve your problem. – Rangi Lin Dec 6 '12 at 12:24
10

Your ClassToMock tightly coupled with FileReader, that's why you are not able to test/mock it. Instead of using tool to hack the byte code so you can mock it. I would suggest you do some simple refactorings to break the dependency.

Step 1. Encapsulate Global References

This technique is also introduced in Michael Feathers's wonderful book : Working Effectively with Legacy Code.

The title pretty much self explained. Instead of directly reference a global variable, you encapsulate it inside a method.

In your case, ClassToMock can be refactored into this :

public class ClassToMock {
  private static final String MEMBER_1 = FileReader.readMemeber1();

  public String getMemberOne() {
    return MEMBER_1;      
  }
}

then you can easily using Mockito to mock getMemberOne().

UPDATED Old Step 1 cannot guarantee Mockito mock safely, if FileReader.readMemeber1() throw exception, then the test will failled miserably. So I suggest add another step to work around it.

Step 1.5. add Setter and Lazy Getter

Since the problem is FileReader.readMember1() will be invoked as soon as ClassToMock is loaded. We have to delay it. So we make the getter call FileReader.readMember1() lazily, and open a setter.

public class ClassToMock {
  private static String MEMBER_1 = null;

  protected String getMemberOne() {
    if (MEMBER_1 == null) {
      MEMBER_1 = FileReader.readMemeber1();
    }
    return MEMBER_1;      
  }

  public void setMemberOne(String memberOne) {
    MEMBER_1 = memberOne;
  }
}

Now, you should able to make a fake ClassToMock even without Mockito. However, this should not be the final state of your code, once you have your test ready, you should continue to Step 2.

Step 2. Dependence Injection

Once you have your test ready, you should refactor it further more. Now Instead of reading the MEMBER_1 by itself. This class should receive the MEMBER_1 from outside world instead. You can either use a setter or constructor to receive it. Below is the code that use setter.

public class ClassToMock {
  private String memberOne;
  public void setMemberOne(String memberOne) {
    this.memberOne = memberOne;
  }

  public String getMemberOne() {
    return memberOne;
  }
}

These two step refactorings are really easy to do, and you can do it even without test at hand. If the code is not that complex, you can just do step 2. Then you can easily test ClassToTest


UPDATE 12/8 : answer the comment

See my another answer in this questions.

4
  • 1
    I would favor constructor injection if possible as it don't break OOP principles, and don't let object half initialized once created (with a no-arg constructor). Still these steps are the way to go ! – Brice Dec 6 '12 at 9:35
  • Actually, I find out step1 cannot guarantee Mocktio mock correctly. I add another step to workaround the problem. – Rangi Lin Dec 6 '12 at 12:23
  • @RangiLin What if FileReader is something very basic like Logging that needs to be there in every class. Would you suggest I follow the same approach there? – pkrish Dec 7 '12 at 16:18
  • @pkrish > In that case, I would suggest other way. Please read my another answer. – Rangi Lin Dec 8 '12 at 5:03
2

UPDATE 12/8 : answer the comment

Question : What if FileReader is something very basic like Logging that needs to be there in every class. Would you suggest I follow the same approach there?

It depends.

There are something you might want to think about before you do a massive refactor like that.

  1. If I move FileReader outside, do I have a suitable class which can read from file and provide the result to every single class that needs them ?

  2. Beside making classes easier to test, do I gain any other benefit ?

  3. Do I have time ?

If any of the answers is "NO", then you should better not to.

However, we can still break the dependency between all the classes and FileReader with minimal changes.

From your question and comment, I assume your system using FileReader as a global reference for reading stuff from a properties file, then provide it to rest of the system.

This technique is also introduced in Michael Feathers's wonderful book : Working Effectively with Legacy Code, again.

Step 1. Delegate FileReader static methods to instance.

Change

public class FileReader {
  public static FileReader getMemberOne() {
    // codes that read file.
  }
}

To

public class FileReader {
  private static FileReader singleton = new FileReader();
  public static String getMemberOne() {
    return singleton.getMemberOne();
  }

  public String getMemberOne() {
    // codes that read file.
  }
}

By doing this, static methods in FileReader now have no knowledge about how to getMemberOne()

Step 2. Extract Interface from FileReader

public interface AppProperties {
  String getMemberOne();
}

public class FileReader implements AppProperties {
  private static AppProperties singleton = new FileReader();
  public static String getMemberOne() {
    return singleton.getMemberOne();
  }

  @Override
  public String getMemberOne() {
    // codes that read file.
  }
}

We extract all the method to AppProperties, and static instance in FileReader now using AppProperties.

Step 3. Static setter

public class FileReader implements AppProperties {
  private static AppProperties singleton = new FileReader();

  public static void setAppProperties(AppProperties prop) {
    singleton = prop;
  }

  ...
  ...
}

We opened a seam in FileReader. By doing this, we can set change underlying instance in FileReader and it would never notice.

Step 4. Clean up

Now FileReader have two responsibilities. One is read files and provide result, another one is provide a global reference for system.

We can separate them and give them a good naming. Here is the result :

// This is the original FileReader, 
// now is a AppProperties subclass which read properties from file.
public FileAppProperties implements AppProperties {
  // implementation.
}

// This is the class that provide static methods.
public class GlobalAppProperties {

  private static AppProperties singleton = new FileAppProperties();

  public static void setAppProperties(AppProperties prop) {
    singleton = prop;
  }

  public static String getMemberOne() {
    return singleton.getMemberOne();
  }
  ...
  ...
}

END.

After this refactoring, whenever you want to test. You can set a mock AppProperties to GlobalAppProperties

I think this refactoring would be better if all you want to do is break the same global dependency in many classes.

1

Powermock core provides a convenient utility method that could be used for this purpose.

Add powermock-core to your project.

testImplementation group: 'org.powermock', name: 'powermock-core', version: '2.0.9'
FileReader fileReader = mock(FileReader.class);
Whitebox.setInternalState(ClassToMock.class, "MEMBER_1", fileReader);

Whitebox.setInternalState is just a convenient method to set the value of a field using reflection. So it could be used along with any Mockito tests.

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