136

Can someone suggest a way to create batches of a certain size in linq?

Ideally I want to be able to perform operations in chunks of some configurable amount.

3
  • This question was asked almost 9 years ago, and now there is a Enumerable.Chunk static method in Linq. Check out the documentation here: docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/api/…
    – BlakeH
    Nov 18 at 13:41
  • 1
    there are still a lot of people sitting .NET Core 3 or 5, or even old good .NET Framework Nov 23 at 1:09
  • @SergeyBerezovskiy that's a really good call. I think the question and answers should remain for that purpose - just wanted to provide context on why I originally asked it :D
    – BlakeH
    Nov 29 at 19:26

21 Answers 21

144

You don't need to write any code. Use MoreLINQ Batch method, which batches the source sequence into sized buckets (MoreLINQ is available as a NuGet package you can install):

int size = 10;
var batches = sequence.Batch(size);

Which is implemented as:

public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<TSource>> Batch<TSource>(
                  this IEnumerable<TSource> source, int size)
{
    TSource[] bucket = null;
    var count = 0;

    foreach (var item in source)
    {
        if (bucket == null)
            bucket = new TSource[size];

        bucket[count++] = item;
        if (count != size)
            continue;

        yield return bucket;

        bucket = null;
        count = 0;
    }

    if (bucket != null && count > 0)
        yield return bucket.Take(count).ToArray();
}
11
  • 3
    4 bytes per item performs terribly? Do you have some tests which show what terribly means? If you are loading millions of items into memory, then I wouldn't do it. Use server-side paging Jul 11 '13 at 19:26
  • 4
    I don't mean to offend you, but there are simpler solutions that do not accumulate at all. Furthermore this will allocate space even for non-existent elements: Batch(new int[] { 1, 2 }, 1000000) Jul 12 '13 at 18:56
  • 9
    @NickWhaley well, agree with you that additional space will be allocated, but in real life you usually have just opposite situation - list of 1000 items which should go in batches of 50 :) Jul 12 '13 at 19:02
  • 1
    Yes the situation should usually be the other way, but in real life, these may be user inputs. Jul 15 '13 at 13:29
  • 11
    This is a perfectly fine solution. In real life you: validate user input, treat batches as entire collections of items (which accumulates the items anyways), and often process batches in parallel (which is not supported by the iterator approach, and will be a nasty surprise unless you know the implementation details). May 19 '14 at 21:07
101
public static class MyExtensions
{
    public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Batch<T>(this IEnumerable<T> items,
                                                       int maxItems)
    {
        return items.Select((item, inx) => new { item, inx })
                    .GroupBy(x => x.inx / maxItems)
                    .Select(g => g.Select(x => x.item));
    }
}

and the usage would be:

List<int> list = new List<int>() { 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 };

foreach(var batch in list.Batch(3))
{
    Console.WriteLine(String.Join(",",batch));
}

OUTPUT:

0,1,2
3,4,5
6,7,8
9
10
  • Worked perfect for me
    – FunMatters
    Aug 6 '15 at 8:55
  • 23
    Once GroupBy starts enumeration, doesn't it have to fully enumerate its source? This loses lazy evaluation of the source and thus, in some cases, all of the benefit of batching!
    – ErikE
    Oct 27 '15 at 18:37
  • 1
    Wow, thanks, you saved me from insanity. Works very well
    – Riaan
    Feb 3 '16 at 7:14
  • 5
    As @ErikE mentions, this method fully enumerates its source so although it looks nice, it defeats the purpose of lazy evaluation / pipelining
    – lasseschou
    Apr 27 '16 at 20:08
  • 3
    Do this - its totally appropriate when you need to break up an existing block of things into smaller batches of things for performant processing. The alternative is a gross looking for loop where you manually break up the batches.and still go through the entire source.
    – StingyJack
    Mar 19 '20 at 20:32
42

If you start with sequence defined as an IEnumerable<T>, and you know that it can safely be enumerated multiple times (e.g. because it is an array or a list), you can just use this simple pattern to process the elements in batches:

while (sequence.Any())
{
    var batch = sequence.Take(10);
    sequence = sequence.Skip(10);

    // do whatever you need to do with each batch here
}
3
  • 3
    Nice, simple way for batching w/o much code or need for external library
    – DevHawk
    Jan 6 '17 at 19:40
  • 9
    @DevHawk: it is. Note, however, that performance will suffer exponentially on large(r) collections.
    – RobIII
    Jan 29 '18 at 10:07
  • 1
    @RobIII: i think the performance problem is the yield, which is not part of this sollution
    – Ive
    Apr 15 at 15:15
31

This is a fully lazy, low overhead, one-function implementation of Batch that doesn't do any accumulation. Based on (and fixes issues in) Nick Whaley's solution with help from EricRoller.

Iteration comes directly from the underlying IEnumerable, so elements must be enumerated in strict order, and accessed no more than once. If some elements aren't consumed in an inner loop, they are discarded (and trying to access them again via a saved iterator will throw InvalidOperationException: Enumeration already finished.).

You can test a complete sample at .NET Fiddle.

public static class BatchLinq
{
    public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Batch<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int size)
    {
        if (size <= 0)
            throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("size", "Must be greater than zero.");
        using (var enumerator = source.GetEnumerator())
            while (enumerator.MoveNext())
            {
                int i = 0;
                // Batch is a local function closing over `i` and `enumerator` that
                // executes the inner batch enumeration
                IEnumerable<T> Batch()
                {
                    do yield return enumerator.Current;
                    while (++i < size && enumerator.MoveNext());
                }

                yield return Batch();
                while (++i < size && enumerator.MoveNext()); // discard skipped items
            }
    }
}
22
  • 2
    This is the only fully lazy implementation here. Consistent with the python itertools.GroupBy implementation. Jan 3 '18 at 18:25
  • 1
    You can eliminate the check for done by just always calling e.Count() after yield return e. You would need to rearrange the loop in BatchInner to not invoke the undefined behavior source.Current if i >= size. This will eliminate the need to allocate a new BatchInner for each batch. Jan 3 '18 at 19:02
  • 1
    You are right, you still need to capture information about the progress of each batch. I did find a bug in your code if you try getting the 2nd item from each batch: bug fiddle. Fixed implementation without a separate class (using C#7) is here: fixed fiddle. Note that I expect the CLR will still create the local function once per loop to capture variable i so this isn't necessarily more efficient than defining a separate class, but it is a little cleaner I think. Apr 7 '18 at 1:56
  • 1
    I benchmarked this version using BenchmarkDotNet against System.Reactive.Linq.EnumerableEx.Buffer and your implementation was 3-4 faster, at the risk of safety. Internally, EnumerableEx.Buffer allocates a Queue of List<T> github.com/dotnet/reactive/blob/… Mar 7 '19 at 22:25
  • 1
    If you want a buffered version of this, you can do: public static IEnumerable<IReadOnlyList<T>> BatchBuffered<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int size) => Batch(source, size).Select(chunk => (IReadOnlyList<T>)chunk.ToList()); Use of IReadOnlyList<T> is to hint the user the output is cached. You could also keep the IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> instead.
    – gfache
    Aug 20 '19 at 15:23
30

All of the above perform terribly with large batches or low memory space. Had to write my own that will pipeline (notice no item accumulation anywhere):

public static class BatchLinq {
    public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Batch<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int size) {
        if (size <= 0)
            throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("size", "Must be greater than zero.");

        using (IEnumerator<T> enumerator = source.GetEnumerator())
            while (enumerator.MoveNext())
                yield return TakeIEnumerator(enumerator, size);
    }

    private static IEnumerable<T> TakeIEnumerator<T>(IEnumerator<T> source, int size) {
        int i = 0;
        do
            yield return source.Current;
        while (++i < size && source.MoveNext());
    }
}

Edit: Known issue with this approach is that each batch must be enumerated and enumerated fully before moving to the next batch. For example this doesn't work:

//Select first item of every 100 items
Batch(list, 100).Select(b => b.First())
14
  • 1
    The routine @L.B posted above doesn't perform item accumulation either.
    – neontapir
    Jul 15 '13 at 15:47
  • 3
    @neontapir Still does. A coin sorting machine that gives you nickels first, then dimes, MUST first inspect every single coin before giving you a dime to be sure there are no more nickels. Jul 23 '13 at 14:11
  • 2
    Ahhh ahha, missed your edit note when I snagged this code. It took some time to understand why iterating over un-enumerated batches actually enumerated the entire original collection (!!!), providing X batches, each having enumerated 1 item (where X is the number of original collection items).
    – eli
    Feb 17 '14 at 10:03
  • 2
    @NickWhaley if I do Count() on the IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> result by your code, it gives wrong answer, it gives total number of elements, when expected is total number of batches created. This is not the case with MoreLinq Batch code Mar 26 '17 at 14:28
  • 1
    @JohnZabroski - Here's a quick gist: gist.github.com/mmurrell/9225ed7c4d107c2195057f77e07f0f68 Mar 8 '19 at 19:09
13

I wonder why nobody has ever posted an old school for-loop solution. Here is one:

List<int> source = Enumerable.Range(1,23).ToList();
int batchsize = 10;
for (int i = 0; i < source.Count; i+= batchsize)
{
    var batch = source.Skip(i).Take(batchsize);
}

This simplicity is possible because the Take method:

... enumerates source and yields elements until count elements have been yielded or source contains no more elements. If count exceeds the number of elements in source, all elements of source are returned

Disclaimer:

Using Skip and Take inside the loop means that the enumerable will be enumerated multiple times. This is dangerous if the enumerable is deferred. It may result in multiple executions of a database query, or a web request, or a file read. This example is explicitly for the usage of a List which is not deferred, so it is less of a problem. It is still a slow solution since skip will enumerate the collection each time it is called.

This can also be solved using the GetRange method, but it requires an extra calculation to extract a possible rest batch:

for (int i = 0; i < source.Count; i += batchsize)
{
    int remaining = source.Count - i;
    var batch = remaining > batchsize  ? source.GetRange(i, batchsize) : source.GetRange(i, remaining);
}

Here is a third way to handle this, which works with 2 loops. This ensures that the collection is enumerated only 1 time!:

int batchsize = 10;
List<int> batch = new List<int>(batchsize);

for (int i = 0; i < source.Count; i += batchsize)
{
    // calculated the remaining items to avoid an OutOfRangeException
    batchsize = source.Count - i > batchsize ? batchsize : source.Count - i;
    for (int j = i; j < i + batchsize; j++)
    {
        batch.Add(source[j]);
    }           
    batch.Clear();
}
4
  • 2
    Very nice solution. People forgot how to use for loop
    – VitalickS
    Aug 7 '19 at 12:40
  • 7
    Using Skip and Take inside the loop means that the enumerable will be enumerated multiple times. This is dangerous if the enumerable is deferred. It may result in multiple executions of a database query, or a web request, or a file read. In your example you have a List which is not deferred, so it is less of a problem. Dec 12 '19 at 8:23
  • @TheodorZoulias yes I know, this is actually why I posted the second solution today. I posted your comment as a disclaimer, because you formulated it quite well, shall I cite you?
    – Mong Zhu
    Dec 12 '19 at 8:44
  • I wrote a third solution with 2 loops so that the collection is enumerated only 1 time. the skip.take thing is a very inefficient solution
    – Mong Zhu
    Dec 12 '19 at 8:51
12

An Enumerable.Chunk() extension method was added to .NET 6.0.

Example:

var list = new List<int> { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 };

var chunks = list.Chunk(3);
// returns { { 1, 2, 3 }, { 4, 5, 6 }, { 7 } }

For those who cannot upgrade, the source is available on GitHub.

1
  • 1
    I knew I saw something about a new Linq method - thanks for posting this!
    – BlakeH
    Jun 21 at 12:15
4

Here is an attempted improvement of Nick Whaley's (link) and infogulch's (link) lazy Batch implementations. This one is strict. You either enumerate the batches in the correct order, or you get an exception.

public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<TSource>> Batch<TSource>(
    this IEnumerable<TSource> source, int size)
{
    if (size <= 0) throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException(nameof(size));
    using (var enumerator = source.GetEnumerator())
    {
        int i = 0;
        while (enumerator.MoveNext())
        {
            if (i % size != 0) throw new InvalidOperationException(
                "The enumeration is out of order.");
            i++;
            yield return GetBatch();
        }
        IEnumerable<TSource> GetBatch()
        {
            while (true)
            {
                yield return enumerator.Current;
                if (i % size == 0 || !enumerator.MoveNext()) break;
                i++;
            }
        }
    }
}

And here is a lazy Batch implementation for sources of type IList<T>. This one imposes no restrictions on the enumeration. The batches can be enumerated partially, in any order, and more than once. The restriction of not modifying the collection during the enumeration is still in place though. This is achieved by making a dummy call to enumerator.MoveNext() before yielding any chunk or element. The downside is that the enumerator is left undisposed, since it is unknown when the enumeration is going to finish.

public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<TSource>> Batch<TSource>(
    this IList<TSource> source, int size)
{
    if (size <= 0) throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException(nameof(size));
    var enumerator = source.GetEnumerator();
    for (int i = 0; i < source.Count; i += size)
    {
        enumerator.MoveNext();
        yield return GetChunk(i, Math.Min(i + size, source.Count));
    }
    IEnumerable<TSource> GetChunk(int from, int toExclusive)
    {
        for (int j = from; j < toExclusive; j++)
        {
            enumerator.MoveNext();
            yield return source[j];
        }
    }
}
3

Same approach as MoreLINQ, but using List instead of Array. I haven't done benchmarking, but readability matters more to some people:

    public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Batch<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int size)
    {
        List<T> batch = new List<T>();

        foreach (var item in source)
        {
            batch.Add(item);

            if (batch.Count >= size)
            {
                yield return batch;
                batch.Clear();
            }
        }

        if (batch.Count > 0)
        {
            yield return batch;
        }
    }
2
  • 2
    You should NOT be reusing the batch variable. Your consumers could be completely screwed up by that. Also, pass in the size parameter to your new List to optimize its size.
    – ErikE
    Sep 26 '17 at 0:58
  • 1
    Easy fix: replace batch.Clear(); with batch = new List<T>();
    – NetMage
    Nov 17 '17 at 20:57
3

Here's the cleanest version of Batch that I can come up with:

public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Batch<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int count)
{
    if (source == null) throw new System.ArgumentNullException("source");
    if (count <= 0) throw new System.ArgumentOutOfRangeException("count");
    using (var enumerator = source.GetEnumerator())
    {
        IEnumerable<T> BatchInner()
        {
            int counter = 0;
            do
                yield return enumerator.Current;
            while (++counter < count && enumerator.MoveNext());
        }
        while (enumerator.MoveNext())
            yield return BatchInner().ToArray();
    }
}

Using this code:

Console.WriteLine(String.Join(Environment.NewLine,
    Enumerable.Range(0, 20).Batch(8).Select(xs => String.Join(",", xs))));

I get:

0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7
8,9,10,11,12,13,14,15
16,17,18,19

It's important to note that on the answers from "" & "" that this code fails:

var e = Enumerable.Range(0, 20).Batch(8).ToArray();

Console.WriteLine(String.Join(Environment.NewLine, e.Select(xs => String.Join(",", xs))));
Console.WriteLine();
Console.WriteLine(String.Join(Environment.NewLine, e.Select(xs => String.Join(",", xs))));

On their answers it gives:

19
19
19

19
19
19

Due to the inner enumerable not being computed as an array.

4
  • 1
    There are more answers with lazy evaluation w/o accumulation. Why is this the cleanest? (Not disagreeing, I like the solution anyway, but an explanation would make it a lot more interesting). Aug 24 at 6:59
  • @GertArnold - Well, I think it's a minimal amount of code. Each of the other solutions using a pure enumerator seem to have extra code that isn't necessary. Aug 24 at 21:53
  • I totally agree! One more thing: you added ToArray, but it also seems to work without. Are there case that require this ToArray call? Aug 25 at 12:16
  • @GertArnold - Without the .ToArray() the code only runs once for var e = Enumerable.Range(0, 20).Batch(8).ToArray();. Try iterating over the inner enumerable with that. It effectively captures the enumerator in BatchInner so on subsequent executions the enumerator is done. Aug 25 at 12:26
2

So with a functional hat on, this appears trivial....but in C#, there are some significant downsides.

you'd probably view this as an unfold of IEnumerable (google it and you'll probably end up in some Haskell docs, but there may be some F# stuff using unfold, if you know F#, squint at the Haskell docs and it will make sense).

Unfold is related to fold ("aggregate") except rather than iterating through the input IEnumerable, it iterates through the output data structures (its a similar relationship between IEnumerable and IObservable, in fact I think IObservable does implement an "unfold" called generate...)

anyway first you need an unfold method, I think this works (unfortunately it will eventually blow the stack for large "lists"...you can write this safely in F# using yield! rather than concat);

    static IEnumerable<T> Unfold<T, U>(Func<U, IEnumerable<Tuple<U, T>>> f, U seed)
    {
        var maybeNewSeedAndElement = f(seed);

        return maybeNewSeedAndElement.SelectMany(x => new[] { x.Item2 }.Concat(Unfold(f, x.Item1)));
    }

this is a bit obtuse because C# doesn't implement some of the things functional langauges take for granted...but it basically takes a seed and then generates a "Maybe" answer of the next element in the IEnumerable and the next seed (Maybe doesn't exist in C#, so we've used IEnumerable to fake it), and concatenates the rest of the answer (I can't vouch for the "O(n?)" complexity of this).

Once you've done that then;

    static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Batch<T>(IEnumerable<T> xs, int n)
    {
        return Unfold(ys =>
            {
                var head = ys.Take(n);
                var tail = ys.Skip(n);
                return head.Take(1).Select(_ => Tuple.Create(tail, head));
            },
            xs);
    }

it all looks quite clean...you take the "n" elements as the "next" element in the IEnumerable, and the "tail" is the rest of the unprocessed list.

if there is nothing in the head...you're over...you return "Nothing" (but faked as an empty IEnumerable>)...else you return the head element and the tail to process.

you probably can do this using IObservable, there's probably a "Batch" like method already there, and you can probably use that.

If the risk of stack overflows worries (it probably should), then you should implement in F# (and there's probably some F# library (FSharpX?) already with this).

(I have only done some rudimentary tests of this, so there may be the odd bugs in there).

1
  • Maybe can exist in C# - see for example Option in Language Ext. Oct 5 '20 at 15:10
1

I'm joining this very late but i found something more interesting.

So we can use here Skip and Take for better performance.

public static class MyExtensions
    {
        public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Batch<T>(this IEnumerable<T> items, int maxItems)
        {
            return items.Select((item, index) => new { item, index })
                        .GroupBy(x => x.index / maxItems)
                        .Select(g => g.Select(x => x.item));
        }

        public static IEnumerable<T> Batch2<T>(this IEnumerable<T> items, int skip, int take)
        {
            return items.Skip(skip).Take(take);
        }

    }

Next I checked with 100000 records. The looping only is taking more time in case of Batch

Code Of console application.

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    List<string> Ids = GetData("First");
    List<string> Ids2 = GetData("tsriF");

    Stopwatch FirstWatch = new Stopwatch();
    FirstWatch.Start();
    foreach (var batch in Ids2.Batch(5000))
    {
        // Console.WriteLine("Batch Ouput:= " + string.Join(",", batch));
    }
    FirstWatch.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("Done Processing time taken:= "+ FirstWatch.Elapsed.ToString());


    Stopwatch Second = new Stopwatch();

    Second.Start();
    int Length = Ids2.Count;
    int StartIndex = 0;
    int BatchSize = 5000;
    while (Length > 0)
    {
        var SecBatch = Ids2.Batch2(StartIndex, BatchSize);
        // Console.WriteLine("Second Batch Ouput:= " + string.Join(",", SecBatch));
        Length = Length - BatchSize;
        StartIndex += BatchSize;
    }

    Second.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("Done Processing time taken Second:= " + Second.Elapsed.ToString());
    Console.ReadKey();
}

static List<string> GetData(string name)
{
    List<string> Data = new List<string>();
    for (int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
    {
        Data.Add(string.Format("{0} {1}", name, i.ToString()));
    }

    return Data;
}

Time taken Is like this.

First - 00:00:00.0708 , 00:00:00.0660

Second (Take and Skip One) - 00:00:00.0008, 00:00:00.0008

5
  • 2
    GroupBy fully enumerates before it produces a single row. This is not a good way to do batching.
    – ErikE
    Apr 27 '16 at 20:43
  • @ErikE That depends on what you are trying to achieve. If the batching is not the issue, and you just need to split the items into smaller chunks for processing it might be just the thing. I'm using this for MSCRM where there might be 100 records which is no problem for LAMBDA to batch.. its the saving that takes seconds..
    – JensB
    Jan 27 '17 at 12:02
  • 2
    Sure, there are use cases where the full enumeration doesn't matter. But why write a second-class utility method when you can write a superb one?
    – ErikE
    Jan 27 '17 at 16:15
  • Good alternative but not identical as first returns a list of lists allowing you to loop through. Jan 26 '18 at 19:08
  • change foreach (var batch in Ids2.Batch(5000)) to var gourpBatch = Ids2.Batch(5000) and check the timed results. or add tolist to var SecBatch = Ids2.Batch2(StartIndex, BatchSize); i would be interested if your results for timing change.
    – Seabizkit
    Dec 11 '19 at 11:17
1

I wrote a custom IEnumerable implementation that works without linq and guarantees a single enumeration over the data. It also accomplishes all this without requiring backing lists or arrays that cause memory explosions over large data sets.

Here are some basic tests:

    [Fact]
    public void ShouldPartition()
    {
        var ints = new List<int> {0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9};
        var data = ints.PartitionByMaxGroupSize(3);
        data.Count().Should().Be(4);

        data.Skip(0).First().Count().Should().Be(3);
        data.Skip(0).First().ToList()[0].Should().Be(0);
        data.Skip(0).First().ToList()[1].Should().Be(1);
        data.Skip(0).First().ToList()[2].Should().Be(2);

        data.Skip(1).First().Count().Should().Be(3);
        data.Skip(1).First().ToList()[0].Should().Be(3);
        data.Skip(1).First().ToList()[1].Should().Be(4);
        data.Skip(1).First().ToList()[2].Should().Be(5);

        data.Skip(2).First().Count().Should().Be(3);
        data.Skip(2).First().ToList()[0].Should().Be(6);
        data.Skip(2).First().ToList()[1].Should().Be(7);
        data.Skip(2).First().ToList()[2].Should().Be(8);

        data.Skip(3).First().Count().Should().Be(1);
        data.Skip(3).First().ToList()[0].Should().Be(9);
    }

The Extension Method to partition the data.

/// <summary>
/// A set of extension methods for <see cref="IEnumerable{T}"/>. 
/// </summary>
public static class EnumerableExtender
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Splits an enumerable into chucks, by a maximum group size.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="source">The source to split</param>
    /// <param name="maxSize">The maximum number of items per group.</param>
    /// <typeparam name="T">The type of item to split</typeparam>
    /// <returns>A list of lists of the original items.</returns>
    public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> PartitionByMaxGroupSize<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int maxSize)
    {
        return new SplittingEnumerable<T>(source, maxSize);
    }
}

This is the implementing class

    using System.Collections;
    using System.Collections.Generic;

    internal class SplittingEnumerable<T> : IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>>
    {
        private readonly IEnumerable<T> backing;
        private readonly int maxSize;
        private bool hasCurrent;
        private T lastItem;

        public SplittingEnumerable(IEnumerable<T> backing, int maxSize)
        {
            this.backing = backing;
            this.maxSize = maxSize;
        }

        public IEnumerator<IEnumerable<T>> GetEnumerator()
        {
            return new Enumerator(this, this.backing.GetEnumerator());
        }

        IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
        {
            return this.GetEnumerator();
        }

        private class Enumerator : IEnumerator<IEnumerable<T>>
        {
            private readonly SplittingEnumerable<T> parent;
            private readonly IEnumerator<T> backingEnumerator;
            private NextEnumerable current;

            public Enumerator(SplittingEnumerable<T> parent, IEnumerator<T> backingEnumerator)
            {
                this.parent = parent;
                this.backingEnumerator = backingEnumerator;
                this.parent.hasCurrent = this.backingEnumerator.MoveNext();
                if (this.parent.hasCurrent)
                {
                    this.parent.lastItem = this.backingEnumerator.Current;
                }
            }

            public bool MoveNext()
            {
                if (this.current == null)
                {
                    this.current = new NextEnumerable(this.parent, this.backingEnumerator);
                    return true;
                }
                else
                {
                    if (!this.current.IsComplete)
                    {
                        using (var enumerator = this.current.GetEnumerator())
                        {
                            while (enumerator.MoveNext())
                            {
                            }
                        }
                    }
                }

                if (!this.parent.hasCurrent)
                {
                    return false;
                }

                this.current = new NextEnumerable(this.parent, this.backingEnumerator);
                return true;
            }

            public void Reset()
            {
                throw new System.NotImplementedException();
            }

            public IEnumerable<T> Current
            {
                get { return this.current; }
            }

            object IEnumerator.Current
            {
                get { return this.Current; }
            }

            public void Dispose()
            {
            }
        }

        private class NextEnumerable : IEnumerable<T>
        {
            private readonly SplittingEnumerable<T> splitter;
            private readonly IEnumerator<T> backingEnumerator;
            private int currentSize;

            public NextEnumerable(SplittingEnumerable<T> splitter, IEnumerator<T> backingEnumerator)
            {
                this.splitter = splitter;
                this.backingEnumerator = backingEnumerator;
            }

            public bool IsComplete { get; private set; }

            public IEnumerator<T> GetEnumerator()
            {
                return new NextEnumerator(this.splitter, this, this.backingEnumerator);
            }

            IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
            {
                return this.GetEnumerator();
            }

            private class NextEnumerator : IEnumerator<T>
            {
                private readonly SplittingEnumerable<T> splitter;
                private readonly NextEnumerable parent;
                private readonly IEnumerator<T> enumerator;
                private T currentItem;

                public NextEnumerator(SplittingEnumerable<T> splitter, NextEnumerable parent, IEnumerator<T> enumerator)
                {
                    this.splitter = splitter;
                    this.parent = parent;
                    this.enumerator = enumerator;
                }

                public bool MoveNext()
                {
                    this.parent.currentSize += 1;
                    this.currentItem = this.splitter.lastItem;
                    var hasCcurent = this.splitter.hasCurrent;

                    this.parent.IsComplete = this.parent.currentSize > this.splitter.maxSize;

                    if (this.parent.IsComplete)
                    {
                        return false;
                    }

                    if (hasCcurent)
                    {
                        var result = this.enumerator.MoveNext();

                        this.splitter.lastItem = this.enumerator.Current;
                        this.splitter.hasCurrent = result;
                    }

                    return hasCcurent;
                }

                public void Reset()
                {
                    throw new System.NotImplementedException();
                }

                public T Current
                {
                    get { return this.currentItem; }
                }

                object IEnumerator.Current
                {
                    get { return this.Current; }
                }

                public void Dispose()
                {
                }
            }
        }
    }
1

Just another one line implementation. It works even with an empty list, in this case you get a zero size batches collection.

var aList = Enumerable.Range(1, 100).ToList(); //a given list
var size = 9; //the wanted batch size
//number of batches are: (aList.Count() + size - 1) / size;

var batches = Enumerable.Range(0, (aList.Count() + size - 1) / size).Select(i => aList.GetRange( i * size, Math.Min(size, aList.Count() - i * size)));

Assert.True(batches.Count() == 12);
Assert.AreEqual(batches.ToList().ElementAt(0), new List<int>() { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 });
Assert.AreEqual(batches.ToList().ElementAt(1), new List<int>() { 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 });
Assert.AreEqual(batches.ToList().ElementAt(11), new List<int>() { 100 });
1

Another way is using Rx Buffer operator

//using System.Linq;
//using System.Reactive.Linq;
//using System.Reactive.Threading.Tasks;

var observableBatches = anAnumerable.ToObservable().Buffer(size);

var batches = aList.ToObservable().Buffer(size).ToList().ToTask().GetAwaiter().GetResult();
1
  • 1
    You should never have to use GetAwaiter().GetResult(). This is a code smell for synchronous code forcefully calling async code.
    – gfache
    Aug 20 '19 at 15:18
1

An easy version to use and understand.

    public static List<List<T>> chunkList<T>(List<T> listToChunk, int batchSize)
    {
        List<List<T>> batches = new List<List<T>>();

        if (listToChunk.Count == 0) return batches;

        bool moreRecords = true;
        int fromRecord = 0;
        int countRange = 0;
        if (listToChunk.Count >= batchSize)
        {
            countRange = batchSize;
        }
        else
        {
            countRange = listToChunk.Count;
        }

        while (moreRecords)
        {
            List<T> batch = listToChunk.GetRange(fromRecord, countRange);
            batches.Add(batch);

            if ((fromRecord + batchSize) >= listToChunk.Count)
            {
                moreRecords = false;
            }

            fromRecord = fromRecord + batch.Count;

            if ((fromRecord + batchSize) > listToChunk.Count)
            {
                countRange = listToChunk.Count - fromRecord;
            }
            else
            {
                countRange = batchSize;
            }
        }
        return batches;
    }
0

I know everybody used complex systems to do this work, and I really don't get it why. Take and skip will allow all those operations using the common select with Func<TSource,Int32,TResult> transform function. Like:

public IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Buffer<T>(IEnumerable<T> source, int size)=>
    source.Select((item, index) => source.Skip(size * index).Take(size)).TakeWhile(bucket => bucket.Any());
2
  • 4
    This might be very inefficient, because the given source will be iterated very often. May 13 '19 at 13:27
  • 2
    This is not only inefficient, but could also produce incorrect results. There is no guarantee that an enumerable will yield the same elements when enumerated twice. Take this enumerable as an example: Enumerable.Range(0, 1).SelectMany(_ => Enumerable.Range(0, new Random().Next())). Jul 26 '19 at 14:49
0

As a new helper method for LINQ in .NET 6 you can chunk any IEnumerable into batches:

int chunkNumber = 1;
foreach (int[] chunk in Enumerable.Range(0, 9).Chunk(3))
{
    Console.WriteLine($"Chunk {chunkNumber++}");
    foreach (var item in chunk)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(item);
    }
}
0

Another way to perform batching:

public static class Extensions
{
    public static IEnumerable<TOut> Batch<T, TOut>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T, T, TOut> func)
    {
        using (var enumerator = source.GetEnumerator())
        {
            while (true)
            {
                bool state;

                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v0 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v1 = enumerator.Current;

                yield return func(v0, v1);
            }
        }
    }

    public static IEnumerable<TOut> Batch<T, TOut>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T, T, T, TOut> func)
    {
        using (var enumerator = source.GetEnumerator())
        {
            while (true)
            {
                bool state;

                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v0 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v1 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v2 = enumerator.Current;

                yield return func(v0, v1, v2);
            }
        }
    }

    public static IEnumerable<TOut> Batch<T, TOut>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T, T, T, T, TOut> func)
    {
        using (var enumerator = source.GetEnumerator())
        {
            while (true)
            {
                bool state;

                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v0 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v1 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v2 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v3 = enumerator.Current;

                yield return func(v0, v1, v2, v3);
            }
        }
    }

    public static IEnumerable<TOut> Batch<T, TOut>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T, T, T, T, T, TOut> func)
    {
        using (var enumerator = source.GetEnumerator())
        {
            while (true)
            {
                bool state;

                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v0 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v1 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v2 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v3 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v4 = enumerator.Current;

                yield return func(v0, v1, v2, v3, v4);
            }
        }
    }

    public static IEnumerable<TOut> Batch<T, TOut>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T, T, T, T, T, T, TOut> func)
    {
        using (var enumerator = source.GetEnumerator())
        {
            while (true)
            {
                bool state;

                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v0 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v1 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v2 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v3 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v4 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v5 = enumerator.Current;

                yield return func(v0, v1, v2, v3, v4, v5);
            }
        }
    }

    public static IEnumerable<TOut> Batch<T, TOut>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T, T, T, T, T, T, T, TOut> func)
    {
        using (var enumerator = source.GetEnumerator())
        {
            while (true)
            {
                bool state;

                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v0 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v1 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v2 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v3 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v4 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v5 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v6 = enumerator.Current;

                yield return func(v0, v1, v2, v3, v4, v5, v6);
            }
        }
    }

    public static IEnumerable<TOut> Batch<T, TOut>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, TOut> func)
    {
        using (var enumerator = source.GetEnumerator())
        {
            while (true)
            {
                bool state;

                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v0 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v1 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v2 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v3 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v4 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v5 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v6 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v7 = enumerator.Current;

                yield return func(v0, v1, v2, v3, v4, v5, v6, v7);
            }
        }
    }

    public static IEnumerable<TOut> Batch<T, TOut>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, TOut> func)
    {
        using (var enumerator = source.GetEnumerator())
        {
            while (true)
            {
                bool state;

                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v0 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v1 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v2 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v3 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v4 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v5 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v6 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v7 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v8 = enumerator.Current;

                yield return func(v0, v1, v2, v3, v4, v5, v6, v7, v8);
            }
        }
    }

    public static IEnumerable<TOut> Batch<T, TOut>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, TOut> func)
    {
        using (var enumerator = source.GetEnumerator())
        {
            while (true)
            {
                bool state;

                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v0 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v1 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v2 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v3 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v4 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v5 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v6 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v7 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v8 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v9 = enumerator.Current;

                yield return func(v0, v1, v2, v3, v4, v5, v6, v7, v8, v9);
            }
        }
    }

    public static IEnumerable<TOut> Batch<T, TOut>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, TOut> func)
    {
        using (var enumerator = source.GetEnumerator())
        {
            while (true)
            {
                bool state;

                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v0 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v1 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v2 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v3 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v4 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v5 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v6 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v7 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v8 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v9 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v10 = enumerator.Current;

                yield return func(v0, v1, v2, v3, v4, v5, v6, v7, v8, v9, v10);
            }
        }
    }

    public static IEnumerable<TOut> Batch<T, TOut>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, TOut> func)
    {
        using (var enumerator = source.GetEnumerator())
        {
            while (true)
            {
                bool state;

                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v0 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v1 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v2 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v3 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v4 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v5 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v6 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v7 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v8 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v9 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v10 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v11 = enumerator.Current;

                yield return func(v0, v1, v2, v3, v4, v5, v6, v7, v8, v9, v10, v11);
            }
        }
    }

    public static IEnumerable<TOut> Batch<T, TOut>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, TOut> func)
    {
        using (var enumerator = source.GetEnumerator())
        {
            while (true)
            {
                bool state;

                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v0 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v1 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v2 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v3 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v4 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v5 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v6 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v7 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v8 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v9 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v10 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v11 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v12 = enumerator.Current;

                yield return func(v0, v1, v2, v3, v4, v5, v6, v7, v8, v9, v10, v11, v12);
            }
        }
    }

    public static IEnumerable<TOut> Batch<T, TOut>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, TOut> func)
    {
        using (var enumerator = source.GetEnumerator())
        {
            while (true)
            {
                bool state;

                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v0 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v1 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v2 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v3 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v4 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v5 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v6 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v7 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v8 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v9 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v10 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v11 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v12 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v13 = enumerator.Current;

                yield return func(v0, v1, v2, v3, v4, v5, v6, v7, v8, v9, v10, v11, v12, v13);
            }
        }
    }

    public static IEnumerable<TOut> Batch<T, TOut>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, TOut> func)
    {
        using (var enumerator = source.GetEnumerator())
        {
            while (true)
            {
                bool state;

                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v0 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v1 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v2 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v3 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v4 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v5 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v6 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v7 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v8 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v9 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v10 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v11 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v12 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v13 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v14 = enumerator.Current;

                yield return func(v0, v1, v2, v3, v4, v5, v6, v7, v8, v9, v10, v11, v12, v13, v14);
            }
        }
    }

    public static IEnumerable<TOut> Batch<T, TOut>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Func<T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, T, TOut> func)
    {
        using (var enumerator = source.GetEnumerator())
        {
            while (true)
            {
                bool state;

                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v0 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v1 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v2 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v3 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v4 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v5 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v6 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v7 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v8 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v9 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v10 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v11 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v12 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v13 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v14 = enumerator.Current;
                state = enumerator.MoveNext(); if (!state) break; var v15 = enumerator.Current;

                yield return func(v0, v1, v2, v3, v4, v5, v6, v7, v8, v9, v10, v11, v12, v13, v14, v15);
            }
        }
    }
}

Here's an example usage:

using System;
using System.Linq;


namespace TestProgram
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            foreach (var item in Enumerable.Range(0, 12).ToArray().Batch((R, X1, Y1, X2, Y2) => (R, X1, Y1, X2, Y2)))
            {
                Console.WriteLine($"{item.R}, {item.X1}, {item.Y1}, {item.X2}, {item.Y2}");
            }
        }
    }
}
0

Here is an implementation that uses Async iteration in C# via IAsyncEnumerable - https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/csharp/whats-new/tutorials/generate-consume-asynchronous-stream

public static class EnumerableExtensions
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Chunks a sequence into a sub-sequences each containing maxItemsPerChunk, except for the last
    /// which will contain any items left over.
    ///
    /// NOTE: this implements a streaming implementation via <seealso cref="IAsyncEnumerable{T}"/>.
    /// </summary>
    public static async IAsyncEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> ChunkAsync<T>(this IAsyncEnumerable<T> sequence, int maxItemsPerChunk)
    {
        if (sequence == null) throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(sequence));
        if (maxItemsPerChunk <= 0)
        {
            throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException(nameof(maxItemsPerChunk), $"{nameof(maxItemsPerChunk)} must be greater than 0");
        }

        var chunk = new List<T>(maxItemsPerChunk);
        await foreach (var item in sequence)
        {
            chunk.Add(item);

            if (chunk.Count == maxItemsPerChunk)
            {
                yield return chunk.ToArray();
                chunk.Clear();
            }
        }

        // return the "crumbs" that 
        // didn't make it into a full chunk
        if (chunk.Count > 0)
        {
            yield return chunk.ToArray();
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Chunks a sequence into a sub-sequences each containing maxItemsPerChunk, except for the last
    /// which will contain any items left over.
    /// </summary>
    public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Chunk<T>(this IEnumerable<T> sequence, int maxItemsPerChunk)
    {
        if (sequence == null) throw new ArgumentNullException(nameof(sequence));
        if (maxItemsPerChunk <= 0)
        {
            throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException(nameof(maxItemsPerChunk), $"{nameof(maxItemsPerChunk)} must be greater than 0");
        }

        var chunk = new List<T>(maxItemsPerChunk);
        foreach (var item in sequence)
        {
            chunk.Add(item);

            if (chunk.Count == maxItemsPerChunk)
            {
                yield return chunk.ToArray();
                chunk.Clear();
            }
        }

        // return the "crumbs" that 
        // didn't make it into a full chunk
        if (chunk.Count > 0)
        {
            yield return chunk.ToArray();
        }
    }
}
-3
    static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> TakeBatch<T>(IEnumerable<T> ts,int batchSize)
    {
        return from @group in ts.Select((x, i) => new { x, i }).ToLookup(xi => xi.i / batchSize)
               select @group.Select(xi => xi.x);
    }
1
  • Add some description/ text in your answer. Putting only code may be meaning less most of time. Jul 2 '15 at 16:52

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