2

I've implemented an consumer/producer priority queue, where the priority is actually a time stamp representing when the item should be delivered. It works pretty well but I would like to know if any one has a better idea to implement this or comments about the current implementation.

The code is in Python. A single thread is created to wake up waiting consumers on time. I know this is an anti-pattern to create a thread in a library but I couldn't devise another method.

Here is the code:

import collections
import heapq
import threading
import time

class TimelyQueue(threading.Thread):
    """
    Implements a similar but stripped down interface of Queue which
    delivers items on time only.
    """

    class Locker:
        def __init__(self, lock):
            self.l = lock
        def __enter__(self):
            self.l.acquire()
            return self.l
        def __exit__(self, type, value, traceback):
            self.l.release()

    # Optimization to avoid wasting CPU cycles when something
    # is about to happen in less than 5 ms.
    _RESOLUTION = 0.005

    def __init__(self):
        threading.Thread.__init__(self)
        self.daemon = True
        self.queue = []
        self.triggered = collections.deque()
        self.putcond = threading.Condition()
        self.getcond = threading.Condition()
        # Optimization to avoid waking the thread uselessly.
        self.putwaketime = 0

    def put(self, when, item):
        with self.Locker(self.putcond):
            heapq.heappush(self.queue, (when, item))
            if when < self.putwaketime or self.putwaketime == 0:
                self.putcond.notify()

    def get(self, timeout=None):
        with self.Locker(self.getcond):
            if len(self.triggered) > 0:
                when, item = self.triggered.popleft()
                return item
                self.getcond.wait(timeout)
            try:
                when, item = self.triggered.popleft()
            except IndexError:
                return None
            return item

    def qsize(self):
        with self.Locker(self.putcond):
            return len(self.queue)

    def run(self):
        with self.Locker(self.putcond):
            maxwait = None
            while True:
                curtime = time.time()
                try:
                    when, item = self.queue[0]
                    maxwait = when - curtime
                    self.putwaketime = when
                except IndexError:
                    maxwait = None
                    self.putwaketime = 0
                self.putcond.wait(maxwait)

                curtime = time.time()
                while True:
                    # Don't dequeue now, we are not sure to use it yet.
                    try:
                        when, item = self.queue[0]
                    except IndexError:
                        break
                    if when > curtime + self._RESOLUTION:
                        break

                    self.triggered.append(heapq.heappop(self.queue))
                if len(self.triggered) > 0:
                    with self.Locker(self.getcond):
                        self.getcond.notify()


if __name__ == "__main__":
    q = TimelyQueue()
    q.start()

    N = 50000
    t0 = time.time()
    for i in range(N):
        q.put(time.time() + 2, i)
    dt = time.time() - t0
    print "put done in %.3fs (%.2f put/sec)" % (dt, N / dt)
    t0 = time.time()
    i = 0
    while i < N:
        a = q.get(3)
        if i == 0:
            dt = time.time() - t0
            print "start get after %.3fs" % dt
            t0 = time.time()
        i += 1
    dt = time.time() - t0
    print "get done in %.3fs (%.2f get/sec)" % (dt, N / dt)
  • 1
    I might make the presence of the thread less explicit, so the object looks like a Queue rather than a Thread. Also, why are you constructing a Locker context manager around the Condition? See the docs. – abarnert Dec 5 '12 at 23:14
  • @abarnert Good idea for the thread, I'll create it in the constructor. Regrding the Locker I think I've never read the documentation that far :). Thanks for the hint! – Jeremie Le Hen Dec 5 '12 at 23:18
  • 1
    Is this meant to be a single-consumer implementation? If not, you might want to consider notifyAll, because there could be multiple entries that have come due at once. More importantly, you probably want multi-threaded unit tests. – abarnert Dec 5 '12 at 23:19
  • @abarnert No, multiple consumers. You are right this is a bug. I've written a multi-threaded test unit externally but it was too big to inline in the file and the code was so ugly I was ashamed to publish it. – Jeremie Le Hen Dec 5 '12 at 23:21
  • One last not-quite-on-topic comment: You may want to look over the source for Queue.py and the unit tests for it in the standard library, just to make sure you didn't miss anything important. And look at whether you can actually build this as a wrapper around Queue (like the standard PriorityQueue) instead of from scratch, so you can get some extra functionality for free (mainly maxsize, which is painful to get right)—although as always, keep YAGNI in mind; it may not be worth it. – abarnert Dec 5 '12 at 23:32
0

The only thing you really need the background thread for here is a timer to kick the waiters when it runs out, right?

First, you could implement that with threading.Timer instead of an explicit background thread. But, while that might be simpler, it won't really solve the problem that you're creating a thread behind the user's back, whether they want it or not. Also, with threading.Timer, you're actually spinning off a new thread every time you restart the timer, which may be a performance problem. (You only have one at a time, but still, starting and stopping threads isn't free.)

If you look around PyPI modules, ActiveState recipes, and various frameworks, there are many implementations that let you run multiple timers on a single background thread. That would solve your problem.

But that still isn't a perfect solution. For example, let's say my app needs 20 TimelyQueue objects--or a TimelyQueue plus 19 other things that all need timers. I'd still end up with 20 threads. Or, let's say I'm building a socket server or a GUI app (the two most obvious use cases for your TimelyQueue; I can implement a timer on top of my event loop (or, most likely, just use a timer that comes with the framework), so why should I need a thread at all?

The way out of that is to offer a hook to supply any timer factory:

def __init__(self, timerfactory = threading.Timer):
    self.timerfactory = timerfactory
    ...

Now, when you need to adjust the timer:

if when < self.waketime:
    self.timer.cancel()
    self.timer = self.timerfactory(when - now(), self.timercallback)
    self.waketime = when

For quick & dirty use cases, this would be good enough out of the box. But if I'm, e.g., using twisted, I can just use TimelyQueue(twisted.reactor.callLater), and now the queue's timers go through the twisted event loop. Or, if I've got a multi-timers-one-thread implementation I'm using elsewhere, TimelyQueue(multiTimer.add), and now the queue's timers go on the same thread as all of my other timers.

If you wanted to, you could supply a better default than threading.Timer, but really, I think most people who need something better than threading.Timer will be able to provide something that's better for their particular app than whatever you provide.

Of course not every timer implementation has the same API as threading.Timer--although you'd be surprised how many of them do. But it's not that hard to write an adapter, if you've got a timer you want to use with TimelyQueue but it has the wrong interface. For example, if I'm building a PyQt4/PySide app, QTimer doesn't have a cancel method, and takes ms instead of seconds, so I'd have to do something like this:

class AdaptedQTimer(object):
    def __init__(self, timeout, callback):
        self.timer = QTimer.singleShot(timeout * 1000, callback)
    def cancel(self):
        self.timer.stop()

q = TimelyQueue(AdaptedQTimer)

Or, if I wanted to integrate the queue into a QObject more directly, I could wrap up QObject.startTimer() and have my timerEvent(self) method call the callback.

Once you're considering adapters, one last idea. I don't think this is worth it, but it might be worth considering. If your timer took a timestamp rather than a timedelta, and has an adjust method rather than/instead of a cancel, and held its own waketime, your TimelyQueue implementation could be simpler, and possibly more efficient. In put, you've got something like this:

if self.timer is None:
    self.timer = self.timerfactory(when)
elif when < self.timer.waketime:
    self.timer.adjust(when)

Of course most timers don't provide this interface. But if someone has one, or is willing to craft one, they can get the benefits. And for everyone else, you can provide a simple adapter that turns a threading.Timer-style timer into the kind you need, something like:

def timerFactoryAdapter(threadingStyleTimerFactory):
    class TimerFactory(object):
        def __init__(self, timestamp, callback):
            self.timer = threadingStyleTimerFactory(timestamp - now(), callback)
            self.callback = callback
        def cancel(self):
            return self.timer.cancel()
        def adjust(self, timestamp):
            self.timer.cancel()
            self.timer = threadingStyleTimerFactory(timestamp - now(), self.callback)
  • That solution sounds nice but I worry about the cost of creating a thread each time I need to arm a timer. Wouldn't it be more reasonable to provide my own termination request method that would have to be called by the caller when needed? – Jeremie Le Hen Dec 9 '12 at 13:28
  • @JeremieLeHen: I'm not sure I understand your question. But let me restate the idea in the answer, and see if it makes more sense that way. – abarnert Dec 9 '12 at 23:24
  • Actually, now that I re-read your question, I think maybe what you're talking about is a timer factory, and I just didn't get your terminology (and vice-versa). If so, I apologize. If not, and if what I'm saying still doesn't do what you want, please clarify. – abarnert Dec 10 '12 at 0:15
0

For the record, I've implemented what you proposed using the timer factory. I ran a small benchmark using the version above and the new version using the threading.Timer class:

  1. First implementation

    • With a default resolution (5 ms, that is everything within a 5 ms window gets fired together), it achieves about 88k put()/sec and 69k get()/sec.

    • With a resolution set to 0 ms (no optimization), it achieves about 88k put()/sec and 55k get()/sec.

  2. Second implementation

    • With a default resolution (5 ms), it achieves about 88k put()/sec and 65k get()/sec.

    • With a resolution set to 0 ms, it achieves about 88k put()/sec and 62k get()/sec.

I admit I am surprised the second implementation is faster without the resolution optimization. It is too late now to investigate.

import collections
import heapq
import threading
import time

class TimelyQueue:
    """
    Implements a similar but stripped down interface of Queue which
    delivers items on time only.
    """

    def __init__(self, resolution=5, timerfactory=threading.Timer):
        """
        `resolution' is an optimization to avoid wasting CPU cycles when
        something is about to happen in less than X ms.
        """
        self.resolution = float(resolution) / 1000
        self.timerfactory = timerfactory
        self.queue = []
        self.triggered = collections.deque()
        self.putcond = threading.Condition()
        self.getcond = threading.Condition()
        # Optimization to avoid waking the thread uselessly.
        self.putwaketime = 0
        self.timer = None
        self.terminating = False

    def __arm(self):
        """
        Arm the next timer; putcond must be acquired!
        """
        curtime = time.time()
        when, item = self.queue[0]
        interval = when - curtime
        self.putwaketime = when
        self.timer = self.timerfactory(interval, self.__fire)
        self.timer.start()

    def __fire(self):
        with self.putcond:
            curtime = time.time()
            debug = 0
            while True:
                # Don't dequeue now, we are not sure to use it yet.
                try:
                    when, item = self.queue[0]
                except IndexError:
                    break
                if when > curtime + self.resolution:
                    break

                debug += 1
                self.triggered.append(heapq.heappop(self.queue))
            if len(self.triggered) > 0:
                with self.getcond:
                    self.getcond.notify(len(self.triggered))
            if self.terminating:
                return
            if len(self.queue) > 0:
                self.__arm()

    def put(self, when, item):
        """
        `when' is a Unix time from Epoch.
        """
        with self.putcond:
            heapq.heappush(self.queue, (when, item))
            if when >= self.putwaketime and self.putwaketime != 0:
                return
            # Arm next timer.
            if self.timer is not None:
                self.timer.cancel()
            self.__arm()

    def get(self, timeout=None):
        """
        Timely return the next object on the queue.
        """
        with self.getcond:
            if len(self.triggered) > 0:
                when, item = self.triggered.popleft()
                return item
            self.getcond.wait(timeout)
            try:
                when, item = self.triggered.popleft()
            except IndexError:
                return None
            return item

    def qsize(self):
        """
        Self explanatory.
        """
        with self.putcond:
            return len(self.queue)

    def terminate(self):
        """
        Request the embedded thread to terminate.
        """
        with self.putcond:
            self.terminating = True
            if self.timer is not None:
                self.timer.cancel()
            self.putcond.notifyAll()


if __name__ == "__main__":
    q = TimelyQueue(0)
    N = 100000
    t0 = time.time()
    for i in range(N):
        q.put(time.time() + 2, i)
    dt = time.time() - t0
    print "put done in %.3fs (%.2f put/sec)" % (dt, N / dt)
    t0 = time.time()
    i = 0
    while i < N:
        a = q.get(3)
        if i == 0:
            dt = time.time() - t0
            print "start get after %.3fs" % dt
            t0 = time.time()
        i += 1
    dt = time.time() - t0
    print "get done in %.3fs (%.2f get/sec)" % (dt, N / dt)
    q.terminate()
    # Give change to the thread to exit properly, otherwise we may get
    # a stray interpreter exception.
    time.sleep(0.1)

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