69

I'd like to enumerate a string and instead of it returning chars I'd like to have the iterative variable be of type string. This probably isn't possible to have the iterative type be a string so what is the most efficient way to iterate through this string?

Do I need to create a new string object with each iteration of the loop or can I perform a cast somehow?

String myString = "Hello, World";
foreach (Char c in myString)
{
    // what I want to do in here is get a string representation of c
    // but I can't cast expression of type 'char' to type 'string'
    String cString = (String)c; // this will not compile
}

12 Answers 12

87

Use the .ToString() Method

String myString = "Hello, World";
foreach (Char c in myString)
{
    String cString = c.ToString(); 
}
18
  • 3
    Consider using the C# types string and char instead of the CLR types. The same in the end but arguably more correct in C#.
    – andleer
    Commented Dec 6, 2012 at 4:44
  • @andleer You are right, I just modified OP's example code to show the ToString Method.
    – Mark Hall
    Commented Dec 6, 2012 at 4:49
  • 1
    The comment was directed at him, not you. No worries.
    – andleer
    Commented Dec 6, 2012 at 13:40
  • 1
    @tom_mai78101, looking over the question again I think I was complaining none of the answers explain why casting a char to a string doesn't work or apparently compile. Commented Jul 20, 2016 at 23:35
  • 1
    Seems to work, but why can't we just use the built-in syntactic way to do explicit conversions? e.g. string s = (string) c Commented Apr 4, 2017 at 0:14
15

You have two options. Create a string object or call ToString method.

String cString = c.ToString();
String cString2 = new String(c, 1); // second parameter indicates
                                    // how many times it should be repeated
8

With C# 6 interpolation:

char ch = 'A';
string s = $"{ch}";

This shaves a few bytes. :)

1
  • 1
    String interpolation efficiency is costly though. Better to just do new String(ch,1).
    – Intrepidis
    Commented Mar 22 at 9:04
5

It seems that the obvious thing to do is this:

String cString = c.ToString()
0
4

Create a new string from the char.

 String cString = new String(new char[] { c });

or

 String cString = c.ToString();
3

I recently wanted to know which approach was the fastest, so I benchmarked 5 approaches.

The answer is that you should use new String(myChar,1), for the fastest times:

|           Method |      Mean |    Error |    StdDev | Rank |   Gen0 | Allocated |
|----------------- |----------:|---------:|----------:|-----:|-------:|----------:|
|        NewString |  10.65 ns | 0.502 ns |  1.473 ns |    1 | 0.0031 |      16 B |
|        AddString |  11.83 ns | 0.845 ns |  2.466 ns |    2 | 0.0030 |      16 B |
|     CharToString |  12.26 ns | 0.662 ns |  1.951 ns |    2 | 0.0030 |      16 B |
| NewStringPointer |  33.03 ns | 1.382 ns |  3.988 ns |    3 | 0.0030 |      16 B |
|      Interpolate | 119.31 ns | 5.351 ns | 15.525 ns |    4 | 0.0083 |      44 B |

Where the 5 methods are:

public string CharToString(char input) => input.ToString();
public string Interpolate(char input) => $"{input}";
public string AddString(char input) => input + "";
public string NewString(char input) => new String(input,1);
public string NewStringPointer(char input)
{
    unsafe
    {
        return new String(& input);
    }
}
4
  • Can you also test having a table of 256 strings (1 for each char) then copying one of them to get a new one? (maybe like cloning if its read-only use or deep copying if its write+read?) Commented Dec 11, 2022 at 11:40
  • @huseyintugrulbuyukisik what do you think you're referring to w.r.t. cloning, and read-only/read-write? None of those concepts are even slightly applicable to strings.
    – Brondahl
    Commented Dec 11, 2022 at 23:02
  • Like a singleton with a string field and changing its field depending on use case. Commented Dec 12, 2022 at 12:49
  • ??? I don't have the faintest idea what you're talking about. But this benchmarking is pretty trivial to run; feel free to go and try it yourself :) Search Nick Chapsas Benchmark.NET
    – Brondahl
    Commented Dec 12, 2022 at 16:17
1

Create an extension method:

public static IEnumerable<string> GetCharsAsStrings(this string value)
{
    return value.Select(c =>
           {
                //not good at all, but also a working variant
                //return string.Concat(c);

                return c.ToString();
           });
}

and loop through strings:

string s = "123456";
foreach (string c in s.GetCharsAsStrings())
{
    //...
}
0
1

you can use + with empty string "", please check the below code:

char a = 'A';
//a_str is a string, the value of which is "A".
string a_str = ""+a;
1
  • 2
    Looks like (ugly) javascript code
    – Steve B
    Commented Sep 15, 2022 at 8:56
0
String cString = c.ToString();
0

Did you try:

String s = new String(new char[] { 'c' });

1
  • 2
    There is no ctor that takes just char Commented Dec 6, 2012 at 3:36
0

Why not this code? Won't it be faster?

string myString = "Hello, World";
foreach( char c in myString )
{
    string cString = new string( c, 1 );
}
0

probably isn't possible to have the iterative type be a string

Sure it is:

foreach (string str in myString.Select(c => c.ToString())
{
...
}

Any of the suggestions in the other answers can be substituted for c.ToString(). Probably the most efficient by a small hair is c => new string(c, 1), which is what char.ToString() probably does under the hood.

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