6

I've made a runnable example that demonstrates the buggy behavior: http://pastebin.com/8KpzD4pw


This issue is EXTREMELY aggravating. I have a wx.ProgressDialog up while I'm saving a file, and upon IOError, I want to close the progress dialog and display an error message. Unfortunately, this seems to be impossible. The progress dialog blatantly refuses to close before the message box closes:

Illustration

As you can see, the message box appears below the progress dialog, so the user has to manually switch focus to the message box to see it's contents. When the message box is closed, the progress dialog disappears as well. Here is the code for the save function:

def save(self, path=None):
    # Show a loading dialog while the document is staving.
    progress = shared.show_loading(self, 'Saving document')

    try:
        raise IOError('Error message')

        if not path:
            self.document.save()
        else:
            self.document.save_to_file(path)
    except IOError as e:
        progress.done()

        message = 'Failed to save file:\n\n{}'.format(e.message)
        wx.MessageBox(message, 'Error', wx.OK | wx.ICON_ERROR)

    progress.done()

The show_loading and progress.done functions are just shortcuts for using the wx.ProgressDialog (source).

Why does the progress dialog not disappear before the message box is opened? How can I fix it?


I have also tried using wx.CallAfter to open the message box, to no avail:

# ...
except IOError as e:
    message = 'Failed to save file:\n\n{}'.format(e.message)

    def show_error():
        wx.MessageBox(message, 'Error', wx.OK | wx.ICON_ERROR)

    progress.done()
    wx.CallAfter(show_error)
# ...

I have also tried to sleep for 100ms between closing the progress dialog and opening the message box using wx.MicroSleep without success.

I have also tried calling wx.Yield() and wx.WakeUpIdle() right after destroying the progress dialog, neither having any effect.

4
  • A way around it could be to hide the dialog instead of trying to close it, I figure closing takes more work and need to be passed through message queues and whatnot while hiding can be done at once. – dutt Dec 6 '12 at 11:34
  • @dutt: Both destroying and hiding works well on OSX (although OSX uses the generic progress dialog), but neither work with Windows 8. – Hubro Dec 6 '12 at 11:44
  • I haven't used Windows for programming in a while so I can't really help you there :/ My guess is that the close message isn't actually handled until the process finishes. When I was working with pyqt there was a way to force the message queue to handle the messages, you could look into something along those lines. – dutt Dec 6 '12 at 11:47
  • @dutt: That sounds like wx.CallAfter, but it didn't work, unfortunately. – Hubro Dec 6 '12 at 12:30
3

I had a similar case, which I finally resolved by calling:

dlg.Update( dlg.GetRange( ) )

It seems that, at least when you put the progress dialog into "pulse" mode, it won't immediately respond to Destroy calls. No amount of sleeping or yielding before or after destroying it would convince my progress dialog to stop displaying. However, by instead simply updating the value to the max, it seems to automatically destroy (or at least hide) itself immediately.

1
  • This answer is a bit late so I can't actually confirm, but it definitely appears to be the best answer – Hubro Jun 14 '19 at 2:00
5

Just out of curiosity... Have you tried using wx.SafeYield() or wx.Yield() or wx.YieldIfNeeded() right after the call to progressdialog.Destroy()?

Your sample is not runnable as it stands so I am just shooting in the dark.

1
  • I have added a runnable example - check the top of my question. – Hubro Dec 7 '12 at 7:30
4

I think Infinity77 has the right answer here. People forget that GUI calls are not synchronous -- they aren't finished by the time they return. That "done" call sends a message to the window, and in response to that, the window probably queues up several more messages to clean itself up. When you fire up a model message box, that creates its OWN message loop, while leaving the original message loop in suspended animation. Thus, the cleanup messages cannot be processed until the message box returns and your main message loop runs again. A Yield call will allow those queued up messages to drain.

1
  • I have added a runnable example. Check the top of my question. – Hubro Dec 7 '12 at 7:31
2

The wxPython demo shows how to interrupt a ProgressDialog. It also shows that you need to Destroy() it instead of Close() it, which is the normal way of getting rid of dialogs. In your exception handler, you will want to stop whatever the ProgressDialog is keeping track of and Destroy() it. Then show your MessageBox.

2
  • Really? I don't see a Destroy() call in your example. Could you write a small runnable example to test with? – Mike Driscoll Dec 6 '12 at 15:20
  • I linked to the source of my shortcut function show_loading. The Destroy call is in there. – Hubro Dec 6 '12 at 15:55
2

I have figured out a workaround. It turns out that I can't remove the native windows progress dialog right after I create it. I have to wait a while, probably for the dialog to be completely initialized, before I'm allowed to destroy it. I added this code:

wx.MilliSleep(50)

Into my progress dialog shortcut function, which introduces an unnoticeable delay after opening the progress dialog and allows me to destroy the progress dialog when ever I want.

Complete shortcut function:

def show_loading(parent, title, message=None, maximum=100):
    if not message:
        message = title

    # A class for the return value.
    class LoadingObject(object):
        def __init__(self, dialog):
            self.dialog = dialog
            self.is_done = False

        def done(self):
            if not self.is_done:
                self.dialog.Destroy()
                self.is_done = True

        def pulse(self, message):
            self.dialog.Pulse(message)

        def progress(self, current, message=None):
            # Don't allow the progress to reach 100%, since it will freeze the
            # dialog.
            if current >= maximum:
                current = current - 1

            if message is not None:
                self.dialog.Update(current, message)
            else:
                self.dialog.Update(current)

    # Create the progress dialog.
    dlg_style = wx.PD_APP_MODAL | wx.PD_ELAPSED_TIME | wx.PD_REMAINING_TIME
    dlg = wx.ProgressDialog(
        title, message, parent=parent, style=dlg_style, maximum=maximum
    )
    dlg.Pulse()

    # Wait just a little bit to allow the progress dialog to initialize.
    wx.MilliSleep(50)

    # Return an instance of the LoadingDialog with the progress dialog attached.
    return LoadingObject(dlg)

Final save function:

def save(self, path=None):
    # Show a loading dialog while the document is staving.
    progress = shared.show_loading(self, 'Saving document')

    try:
        if not path:
            self.document.save()
        else:
            self.document.save_to_file(path)
    except IOError as e:
        message = 'Failed to save file:\n\n{}'.format(e.message)
        wx.MessageBox(message, 'Error', wx.OK | wx.ICON_ERROR)
    finally:
        progress.done()
-2

I took a slightly different approach to this problem. Had multiple function calls in a linear order, and wanted to show the overall progress as function calls were done. I simply wrapped the progress bar in a function, taking the function to call and its arguments. On exception I destroy the progress bar, and raise the exception. Example below:

def _progress_wrap(self, func, *args, **kwargs):
    self.count += 1
    self.progress.Update(self.count)
    res = None
    try:
        res = func(*args, **kwargs)
    except Exception:
        self.progress.Destroy()
        raise
    return(res)

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