29

How do I check the validity of an IP address in a shell script, that is within the range 0.0.0.0 to 255.255.255.255?

13 Answers 13

55

If you're using bash, you can do a simple regex match for the pattern, without validating the quads:

#!/usr/bin/env bash

ip=1.2.3.4

if [[ $ip =~ ^[0-9]+\.[0-9]+\.[0-9]+\.[0-9]+$ ]]; then
  echo "success"
else
  echo "fail"
fi

If you're stuck with a POSIX shell, then you can use expr to do basically the same thing, using BRE instead of ERE:

#!/bin/sh

ip=1.2.3.4

if expr "$ip" : '[0-9][0-9]*\.[0-9][0-9]*\.[0-9][0-9]*\.[0-9][0-9]*$' >/dev/null; then
  echo "success"
else
  echo "fail"
fi

Note that expr assumes that your regex is anchored to the left-hand-side of the string, so the initial ^ is unnecessary.

If it's important to verify that each quad is less than 256, you'll obviously require more code:

#!/bin/sh

ip=${1:-1.2.3.4}

if expr "$ip" : '[0-9][0-9]*\.[0-9][0-9]*\.[0-9][0-9]*\.[0-9][0-9]*$' >/dev/null; then
  for i in 1 2 3 4; do
    if [ $(echo "$ip" | cut -d. -f$i) -gt 255 ]; then
      echo "fail ($ip)"
      exit 1
    fi
  done
  echo "success ($ip)"
  exit 0
else
  echo "fail ($ip)"
  exit 1
fi

Or perhaps even with fewer pipes:

#!/bin/sh

ip=${1:-1.2.3.4}

if expr "$ip" : '[0-9][0-9]*\.[0-9][0-9]*\.[0-9][0-9]*\.[0-9][0-9]*$' >/dev/null; then
  IFS=.
  set $ip
  for quad in 1 2 3 4; do
    if eval [ \$$quad -gt 255 ]; then
      echo "fail ($ip)"
      exit 1
    fi
  done
  echo "success ($ip)"
  exit 0
else
  echo "fail ($ip)"
  exit 1
fi

Or again, if your shell is bash, you could use a cumbersome regular expression for quad validation if you're not fond of arithmetic:

#!/usr/bin/env bash

ip=${1:-1.2.3.4}

re='^(0*(1?[0-9]{1,2}|2([0-4][0-9]|5[0-5]))\.){3}'
 re+='0*(1?[0-9]{1,2}|2([‌​0-4][0-9]|5[0-5]))$'

if [[ $ip =~ $re ]]; then
  echo "success"
else
  echo "fail"
fi

This could also be expressed in BRE, but that's more typing than I have in my fingers.

And lastly, if you like the idea of putting this functionality ... in a function:

#!/usr/bin/env bash

ip=${1:-1.2.3.4}

ipvalid() {
  # Set up local variables
  local ip=${1:-1.2.3.4}
  local IFS=.; local -a a=($ip)
  # Start with a regex format test
  [[ $ip =~ ^[0-9]+(\.[0-9]+){3}$ ]] || return 1
  # Test values of quads
  local quad
  for quad in {0..3}; do
    [[ "${a[$quad]}" -gt 255 ]] && return 1
  done
  return 0
}

if ipvalid "$ip"; then
  echo "success ($ip)"
  exit 0
else
  echo "fail ($ip)"
  exit 1
fi

There are many ways you could do this. I've shown you just a few.

  • Nice solution. It works for me! I observed, however, using your ipvalid function that the input variable gets modified (e.g. 111.222.333.444 becomes 111 222 333 444 after the function gets called). I think it occurs at local -a a=($ip). I observed it in bash on both macOS and Debian. – focorner Apr 8 '17 at 13:50
  • 1
    @focorner, glad you like it. :) The input variable doesn't get modified, but the IFS=. causes it to be expressed differently. I suspect that the best solution here is to assign the field separator locally, so local IFS=.;, so that the change doesn't affect behaviour outside of the function. I've made this change in the script above; please let me know if it still shows the same behaviour for you. – ghoti Apr 10 '17 at 2:36
  • 1
    ghoti, you're right: setting IFS=. as local inside the function as you suggested does the trick. Thank you. A+ – focorner Apr 10 '17 at 23:32
  • 1
    I've changed [[ $ip =~ ^[0-9]+(\.[0-9]+){3}$ ]] || return 1 with [[ $ip =~ ^[0-9]{1,3}(\.[0-9]{1,3}){3}$ ]] || return 1, to avoid 00200.0.0.1 be valid ( it actually valid, but not decimal) – MaximKostrikin Nov 20 '18 at 12:20
  • @MaximKostrikin, that's reasonable. Leading zeroes in a quad are subject to misinterpretation. What about 020 or 002 though? Would it not be better to go all the way, with ^[1-9][0-9]{,2}(\.[1-9][0-9]{,2}){3}$? The logical extreme of this is of course mentioned earlier in the answer, with a RE that matches 0 to 255. I think my preferred option would be simply to use a 10# at the start of the arithmetic comparison, to force use of base 10. If there are leading zeroes, then so be it. – ghoti Nov 20 '18 at 14:17
10

Use ipcalc

$ ipcalc -cs 10.10.10.257 && echo vail_ip || echo invalid_ip
invalid_ip
  • 2
    Doesn't work on my system (Debian Linux), -s parameter expects an argument and the return code appears to be 0 even when an error occurs. – Peter Gerber Mar 19 '17 at 12:22
  • Couldn't make it work on Cygwin because of the -s parameter, either. The answer "This single regex..." by @JonSouth a few posts below worked like a charm, though. – Keijo D Putt Feb 27 '18 at 21:19
  • Doesn't work. "-s" option is "Split into networks of size n1, n2, n3." – Rfraile Sep 17 '18 at 7:58
  • if ipcalc -c $ip |grep -i invalid ;then echo "Provided IP $ip was invalid" ;fi – T'Saavik Sep 1 '20 at 17:54
7

The script Validating an IP Address in a Bash Script by Mitch Frazier does what you want to do:

function valid_ip()
{
local  ip=$1
local  stat=1

if [[ $ip =~ ^[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}$ ]]; then
    OIFS=$IFS
    IFS='.'
    ip=($ip)
    IFS=$OIFS
    [[ ${ip[0]} -le 255 && ${ip[1]} -le 255 \
        && ${ip[2]} -le 255 && ${ip[3]} -le 255 ]]
    stat=$?
fi
return $stat
}
  • 2
    You beat me to it by a second. Also make sure to check the comments down the bottom, there are a few revisions to handle some cases. – PeterJ Dec 8 '12 at 12:23
  • 1
    That's bash, not POSIX. The OP has specified that he's using linux, but not necessarily that bash is the shell. – ghoti Dec 8 '12 at 15:48
  • 1
    You should edit the code into your post for both convenience and so your answer doesn't become invalid if the link goes down. – icktoofay Dec 8 '12 at 21:56
6

This single regex should validate only those addresses between 0.0.0.0 and 255.255.255.255:

#!/bin/bash

ip="1.2.3.4"

if [[ "$ip" =~ ^(([1-9]?[0-9]|1[0-9][0-9]|2([0-4][0-9]|5[0-5]))\.){3}([1-9]?[0-9]|1[0-9][0-9]|2([0-4][0-9]|5[0-5]))$ ]]; then
  echo "success"
else
  echo "fail"
fi
3

i tweaked all the codes and found this to be helpful.

#!/bin/bash

ip="256.10.10.100"

if [[ "$ip" =~ (([01]{,1}[0-9]{1,2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5])\.([01]{,1}[0-9]{1,2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5])\.([01]{,1}[0-9]{1,2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5])\.([01]{,1}[0-9]{1,2}|2[0-4][0-9]|25[0-5]))$ ]]; then
  echo "success"
else
  echo "fail"
fi
  • Accepting 1.2.3.4.5, 1.2.3.4.5.6, 255.255.255.255.255, etc. You need to limit number of octets. – Hasan Rumman Mar 30 '20 at 7:02
3

The typical solutions for this all seem to use regular expressions, but it occurs to me that it might be a better approach to do something like:

if echo "$ip" | { IFS=. read a b c d e;
    test "$a" -ge 0 && test "$a" -le 255 &&
    test "$b" -ge 0 && test "$b" -le 255 &&
    test "$c" -ge 0 && test "$c" -le 255 &&
    test "$d" -ge 0 && test "$d" -le 255 &&
    test -z "$e"; }; then echo is valid; fi
  • Note that this fails for the string 1.2.3.4. (note the trailing .) – William Pursell Dec 9 '12 at 3:21
  • It's not just trailing dots, this also gives a false result on 1.2.3.4.a. Obviously in bash you could use a pattern match, perhaps even an extglob, to pre-test $ip before running through the code in your answer, but what might you do in POSIX? – ghoti Apr 19 '16 at 11:48
  • 1
    @ghoti Makes a good point. We can make this more robust easily with a 5th variable that should be empty. (I am making no claims at all that this is reliable, but this edit is certainly better.) – William Pursell Apr 19 '16 at 13:46
  • Very nice. My only concern at this point would then be the unhandled (and perhaps unnecessary) output when /bin/test tries to evaluate non-integers using -ge or -le. But if someone cared, they could always redirect stderr. – ghoti Feb 7 '17 at 16:54
  • Actually this will bail in the test a.a.a.a – mcdoomington Dec 25 '17 at 20:41
1

I prefer to use ipcalc to do this, as long as my script doesn't have to be portable.

ipcalc 1.1.1.355                                                                         
INVALID ADDRESS: 1.1.1.355

Address:   192.168.1.1          11000000.10101000.00000001. 00000001
Netmask:   255.255.255.0 = 24   11111111.11111111.11111111. 00000000
Wildcard:  0.0.0.255            00000000.00000000.00000000. 11111111
=>
Network:   192.168.1.0/24       11000000.10101000.00000001. 00000000
HostMin:   192.168.1.1          11000000.10101000.00000001. 00000001
HostMax:   192.168.1.254        11000000.10101000.00000001. 11111110
Broadcast: 192.168.1.255        11000000.10101000.00000001. 11111111
Hosts/Net: 254                   Class C, Private Internet

There is a great page showing how to use it in scripting, etc, here: SleeplessBeastie's Notes

1

How about this?

# ip route get 10.10.10.100 > /dev/null 2>&1  ; echo $?
0

# ip route get 10.10.10.300 > /dev/null 2>&1  ; echo $?
1

Since the "ip" command checks the validity of IP in itself.

0

Perl has a great module Regexp::Common for validating various things:

perl -MRegexp::Common=net -e 'exit(shift() !~ /^$RE{net}{IPv4}$/)' $ipaddr

You may need to sudo cpan install Regexp::Common first

I'd wrap it in a function:

valid_ip() {
  perl -MRegexp::Common=net -e 'exit(shift() !~ /^$RE{net}{IPv4}$/)' "$1"
}

if valid_ip 123.234.345.456; then
  echo OK
else
  echo INVALID
fi
  • 1
    Nice. Though, I wouldn't be recommending direct CPAN installs for most folks. If modules can be installed from a package repository, you'll generally keep your system cleaner and more secure. In Ubuntu, you would sudo apt-get install libregexp-common-perl In FreeBSD, it would be cd /usr/ports/textproc/p5-Regexp-Common && make install. – ghoti Dec 9 '12 at 2:32
0
#!/bin/bash
read -p " ip: " req_ipadr
#
ip_full=$(echo $req_ipadr | sed -n 's/^\(\(\([1-9][0-9]\?\|[1][0-9]\{0,2\}\|[2][0-4][0-9]\|[2][5][0-4]\)\.\)\{3\}\([1-9][0-9]\?\|[1][0-9]\{0,2\}\|[2][0-4][0-9]\|[2][5][0-4]\)\)$/\1/p')
#
[ "$ip_full" != "" ] && echo "$req_ipadr vaild ip" || echo "$req_ipadr invaild ip"
0

You can just copy the following code and change body of if else control as per your need

function checkIP(){
echo "Checking IP Integrity"    
ip=$1
byte1=`echo "$ip"|xargs|cut -d "." -f1`
byte2=`echo "$ip"|xargs|cut -d "." -f2`
byte3=`echo "$ip"|xargs|cut -d "." -f3`
byte4=`echo "$ip"|xargs|cut -d "." -f4`


if [[  $ip =~ ^[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}$  && $byte1 -ge 0 && $byte1 -le 255 && $byte2 -ge 0 && $byte2 -le 255 && $byte3 -ge 0 && $byte3 -le 255 && $byte4 -ge 0 && $byte4 -le 255 ]]
then
    echo "IP is correct"
else
    echo "This Doesn't look like a valid IP Address : $ip" 
fi
}
checkIP $myIP 

Calling the method with IP Address stored in a variable named myIP.

$ip =~ ^[0-9]{1,3}.[0-9]{1,3}.[0-9]{1,3}.[0-9]{1,3}$ - This part makes sure that IP consists of 4 blocks separated by a dot(.) but every block here is allowed to range from 0 - 999

Since desired range of every block would be 0 - 255, to make sure of that below line can be used.

$byte1 -ge 0 && $byte1 -le 255 && $byte2 -ge 0 && $byte2 -le 255 && $byte3 -ge 0 && $byte3 -le 255 && $byte4 -ge 0 && $byte4 -le 255

0

In the most simple form:-

#!/bin/bash
while true;
do
read -p "Enter a ip: " IP
echo "${IP}" > ip.txt
OCT1=$(cat ip.txt | awk -F "." '{print $1}')
OCT2=$(cat ip.txt | awk -F "." '{print $2}')
OCT3=$(cat ip.txt | awk -F "." '{print $3}')
OCT4=$(cat ip.txt | awk -F "." '{print $4}')
REGEX_IP='^[0-9]{1,3}[.][0-9]{1,3}[.][0-9]{1,3}[.][0-9]{1,3}$'
if [[ ${IP} =~ ${REGEX_IP} ]]
then
    if [[ ${OCT1} -gt 255 || ${OCT2} -gt 255 || ${OCT3} -gt 255 || ${OCT4} -gt 255 ]]
        then
        echo "Please enter a valid ip"
        continue
        fi

break
else
        echo "Please enter a valid ip"
        continue
fi
done

This will cover all the scenarios.

0

Alternate version that still does a thorough validation (meaning that it requires both a properly formatted IP address AND that each quadrant is within the range of allowed values aka 0-255). Works fine on GNU bash 4.4.20 (Linux Mint 19.3); no promises elsewhere but will prolly be fine as long as you have bash 4.

The initial format check regex is borrowed from the shannonman / Mitch Frazier answer above; the rest is my own.

    function isValidIpAddr() {
        # return code only version
        local ipaddr="$1";
        [[ ! $ipaddr =~ ^[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}$ ]] && return 1;
        for quad in $(echo "${ipaddr//./ }"); do
            (( $quad >= 0 && $quad <= 255 )) && continue;
            return 1;
        done
    }
    function validateIpAddr() {
        # return code + output version
        local ipaddr="$1";
        local errmsg="ERROR: $1 is not a valid IP address";
        [[ ! $ipaddr =~ ^[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}\.[0-9]{1,3}$ ]] && echo "$errmsg" && return 1;
        for quad in $(echo "${ipaddr//./ }"); do
            (( $quad >= 0 && $quad <= 255 )) && continue;
            echo "$errmsg";
            return 1;
        done
        echo "SUCCESS: $1 is a valid IP address";
    }

    $ isValidIpAddr '192.168.0.1'
    $ echo "$?"
    0

    $ isValidIpAddr '192.168.0.256'
    $ echo "$?"
    1

    $ validateIpAddr '12.1.10.191'
    SUCCESS: 12.1.10.191 is a valid IP address

    $ validateIpAddr '1.1.1.127'
    SUCCESS: 1.1.1.127 is a valid IP address

    $ validateIpAddr '1.1.1.1337'
    ERROR: 1.1.1.1337 is not a valid IP address

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