-3

How I can write the following without &&?

if(a == 1 && b == 2) { ... }

Can I create a function for the operator?

  • 1
    Maybe it's an interview riddle – Esailija Dec 8 '12 at 16:48
  • 1
    @Knownasilya You're still using &&, just adding more overhead. – Madbreaks Dec 8 '12 at 16:48
  • 9
    !(a != 1 || b != 2) :) – Alexander Dec 8 '12 at 16:49
  • 4
    Alexander's formula is based on De Morgan's law. – phant0m Dec 8 '12 at 16:54
  • 1
    I doubt it is what OP wanted. If by chance it is then I will put it as an answer. Anyways, more information is needed – Alexander Dec 8 '12 at 17:01
4

Create a function to encapsulate your operation:

function compare(a, b, value1, value2) {
    if(a === value1) {
        if(b === value2) {
            return true;
        }
    }
    return false;
}

And you can use it like so:

if(compare(a, b, 1, 2)) {
    // Your action..
}
| improve this answer | |
  • This is not equivalent if a and b are arbitrary expressions! – phant0m Dec 8 '12 at 16:56
  • 1
    Can you explain what you mean by that statement? – knownasilya Dec 8 '12 at 16:58
  • I have explained it in my answer. – phant0m Dec 8 '12 at 17:00
  • 1
    You never explaind why though, you said that you cannot do it one way, and provided an alternate way. The only reason you gave was cosmetic.. I think you need to clarify what you mean, and why it cannot be done with a function. – knownasilya Dec 8 '12 at 17:02
4

You can do this like

if(a==1){
  if(b==2){
    JS function
  }
}

Both will work the same but if(a==1 && b==2) is a good approach to do exactly the same.

| improve this answer | |
1

Not sure why you'd want to do this, but you could nest if statements:

if(a == 1){
    if(b == 2){
        ...
    }
}

Or you could use a bitwise operator, if you really just need to consider 2 and 1

if(b >> a === 1){
    ...
}

There are a lot ways to do it, but it really depends on your data.

| improve this answer | |
1

You could take advantage of prototypal inheritance, and create a constructor with its prototype extended with methods.

function Comparer(a, b) {
    if (!(this instanceof Comparer))
        return new Comparer(a, b);

    this.assign(a, b);
    this.compare();
}

Comparer.prototype.result = false;
Comparer.prototype.compare = function() {
    this.result = this.a == this.b;
};
Comparer.prototype.assign = function(a, b) {
    this.a = a;
    this.b = b;
};
Comparer.prototype.and = function(a, b) {
    this.assign(a, b);
    if (this.result !== false) 
        this.compare();
    return this;
};
Comparer.prototype.or = function(a, b) {
    this.assign(a, b);
    if (this.result !== true) 
        this.compare();
    return this;
};

And use it like this:

var a = 1,
    b = 2;

if (Comparer(a, 1).and(b, 2).result) 
    console.log("pass");
else
    console.log("fail");

We could even extend it to get rid of the if statement.

Comparer.prototype.then = function(fn) {
    if (this.result === true)
        fn();
    return this;
};
Comparer.prototype.otherwise = function(fn) {
    if (this.result === false)
        fn();
    return this;
};

And use it like this:

var a = 1,
    b = 2;

Comparer(a, 1)
    .and(b, 2)
    .then(function() { console.log("pass"); })
    .otherwise(function() { console.log("fail"); });

Or shorten things up like this:

var log = Function.bind.bind(console.log, console);

var a = 1,
    b = 2;

Comparer(a, 1)
    .and(b, 2)
    .then(log("pass"))
    .otherwise(log("fail"));
| improve this answer | |
0

Your question is sort of pointless, but you could use the multiplication operator * instead of &&:

if(a==1 * b==2){
    //do something
}
| improve this answer | |
  • This does not preserve short-circuiting. – phant0m Dec 8 '12 at 17:00
  • 1
    @phant0m Yes, but the results are equivalent. – Asad Saeeduddin Dec 8 '12 at 17:01
  • It depends on what you mean by results. If b is an expression that changes state, for instance a function call, then the result may be far from equal. – phant0m Dec 8 '12 at 17:02
  • 1
    @phant0m Where is that requirement in op's question? – Madbreaks Dec 8 '12 at 17:02
  • 1
    @phant0m In what circumstance could evaluating the expression b trigger a change of state? Go ahead, I'll wait. – Asad Saeeduddin Dec 8 '12 at 17:04
0

If you want to implement the operator && as a function, it's going to get ugly, because you need to pass the conditions as closures, whenever you care about short-circuiting with side-effects.

Example:

if(condition && changeTheWorld()) { ... }

// Cannot be translated into a function call of this nature:
if(land(condition, changeTheWorld()) { ... }

Instead, you would need to create a closure:

if(land(condition, function() {return changeTheWorld()}) {...}

As you can see, it's really cumbersome and verbose while there's no advantage.

If you really need this as a funciton, here is an

Implementation with short-circuiting

This function emulates the semantics of && correctly, if you pass the conditions that must not get evaluated—in the case of short-circuiting—as functions instead as expressions.

In other words, the function goes through the arguments in order, if one is a function, it evaluates it first, otherwise it just takes its value, if falsy, it aborts by returning false, otherwise, it continues with the next parameter.

function land(){
    for(var i = 0; i < arguments.length; i++) {
        var operand = arguments[i];
        var value = (typeof operand === 'function') ? operand() : operand;
        if (!value) {
            return false;
        }
    }
    return true;
}

Example:

function evaluateTo(result) {
    return function() {
            console.log("Evaluating " + result);
        return result;
    };
}

if(land(true, evaluateTo(1))) {
    console.log("All truthy");
}
// Outputs:
// Evaluating 1
// All truthy

if(land(evaluateTo(1), evaluateTo(0), evaluateTo(true))) {
    console.log("All truthy");
}
// Outputs:
// Evaluating 1
// Evaluating 0

Obligatory missile example

function changeTheWorld() {
    console.log("Missiles away!");
    // Firing 3 missiles
    return nukeTheGlobe(3);
}

if(false && changeTheWorld() == 3) { ... }
// we survived, missiles not fired

if(naiveLand(maybe, changeTheWorld() == 3) { ... }
// Missiles away! no matter what value `maybe` has

if(land(false, function(){ return changeTheWorld() == 3; })) {...}
// we survived, missiles not fired
| improve this answer | |
  • Why do we need to pass the conditions as closures? – knownasilya Dec 8 '12 at 17:03
  • 1
    Please provide an implementation of this, as it stands your answer isn't an answer at all. – Madbreaks Dec 8 '12 at 17:05
  • @Knownasilya changeTheWorld() is symbolic for any expression, that changes some state when evaluated. If condition before the && operator evaluates to false, that state is not going to be changed. Imagine changeTheWorld() deletes a comment and condition is used to confirm the action. Without closures, the comment is going to be deleted no matter whether the deletion was confirmed or not. – phant0m Dec 8 '12 at 17:07
  • @Madbreaks My answer is about the perils of implementing the && as a function naively and entirely symbolic because of that. Moreover, it is about how you would use the function if you did correctly replicate the semantics of && and how it's going to turn out. An implementation of land is not necessary to understand my answer. – phant0m Dec 8 '12 at 17:13
  • 1
    @Knownasilya I have added an implementation. – phant0m Dec 11 '12 at 21:44

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.