172

I need to check if a specific login already exists on the SQL Server, and if it doesn't, then I need to add it.

I have found the following code to actually add the login to the database, but I want to wrap this in an IF statement (somehow) to check if the login exists first.

CREATE LOGIN [myUsername] WITH PASSWORD=N'myPassword', 
DEFAULT_LANGUAGE=[us_english], 
CHECK_EXPIRATION=OFF, 
CHECK_POLICY=OFF 
GO

I understand that I need to interrogate a system database, but not sure where to start!

  • 10
    This is an important question, but as phrased, it seems to miss an important distinction: user vs. login. The potential duplicate that Jon linked to really seems to be about users. This question says "user" in the title, but deals with logins in the question code and in the accepted answer. I edited the title and question accordingly. – LarsH May 8 '13 at 15:07
  • 1
    Just to add to the comment by @LarsH, logins are associated with a SQL server instance, and users are associated with a specific database. Database users can be created from server logins, so they have access to a specific database. See this excellent article and in fact the whole series it is part of (Stariway to SQL Server Security) – Reversed Engineer Nov 17 '17 at 14:11

10 Answers 10

138

From here

If not Exists (select loginname from master.dbo.syslogins 
    where name = @loginName and dbname = 'PUBS')
Begin
    Select @SqlStatement = 'CREATE LOGIN ' + QUOTENAME(@loginName) + ' 
    FROM WINDOWS WITH DEFAULT_DATABASE=[PUBS], DEFAULT_LANGUAGE=[us_english]')

    EXEC sp_executesql @SqlStatement
End
|improve this answer|||||
  • 6
    you should use QUOTENAME to prevent sql injection. Attacker can pass a @loginName like x] with password ''y'';\r\ndrop table foo;\r\n – Remus Rusanu Sep 4 '09 at 14:47
  • 2
    Why was it necessary to create a statement as a string and then use sp_executesql, rather than just directly entering CREATE LOGIN [@loginName] FROM ...? Pardon my ignorance, I'd like to learn... – LarsH May 8 '13 at 15:10
  • 4
    @LarsH: Creating the statement as a string is required because CREATE LOGIN cannot use a parameter for the login name, it requires a string literal. Not sure why that is, but I found out the hard way that its true. – Joseph Bongaarts Apr 29 '14 at 20:27
  • @JosephBongaarts: OK, thanks. I guess it's like table names in SELECT statements. Maybe the idea is to decrease the surface area vulnerable to attacks, though I don't know that it would help. – LarsH Apr 30 '14 at 18:38
  • 1
    I think QUOTENAME() goes around @loginName, not the whole statement, and then you can get rid of the manual [ and ] delimiters around @loginName. – brianary Apr 14 '15 at 19:40
284

Here's a way to do this in SQL Server 2005 and later without using the deprecated syslogins view:

IF NOT EXISTS 
    (SELECT name  
     FROM master.sys.server_principals
     WHERE name = 'LoginName')
BEGIN
    CREATE LOGIN [LoginName] WITH PASSWORD = N'password'
END

The server_principals view is used instead of sql_logins because the latter doesn't list Windows logins.

If you need to check for the existence of a user in a particular database before creating them, then you can do this:

USE your_db_name

IF NOT EXISTS
    (SELECT name
     FROM sys.database_principals
     WHERE name = 'Bob')
BEGIN
    CREATE USER [Bob] FOR LOGIN [Bob] 
END
|improve this answer|||||
  • 17
    Best answer, no dynamic sql involved, nor any deprecated view usage. Thanks! – Casper Leon Nielsen Aug 9 '11 at 15:44
  • 7
    In the case of SQL Azure, the two target tables are sys.sql_logins and sys.sysusers -- might be nice to include this in the answer. – Brett Apr 6 '16 at 17:44
  • Not useful if your script needs to use a variable username. – Ross Presser Feb 26 '19 at 18:00
30

As a minor addition to this thread, in general you want to avoid using the views that begin with sys.sys* as Microsoft is only including them for backwards compatibility. For your code, you should probably use sys.server_principals. This is assuming you are using SQL 2005 or greater.

|improve this answer|||||
  • Tested, works, and more current than the other answers. +1 to you as well. – David Sep 4 '09 at 14:17
  • Yeah, with 2005 Microsoft took away direct access to the system tables. To keep from breaking old code, they include views that had the same name as the old tables. However, they are only meant for older code and newer code should iuse the new views. In BOL, do a search on Mapping System Tables to find out what you should use. – Bomlin Sep 4 '09 at 14:29
9

You can use the built-in function:

SUSER_ID ( [ 'myUsername' ] )

via

IF [value] IS NULL [statement]

like:

IF SUSER_ID (N'myUsername') IS NULL
CREATE LOGIN [myUsername] WITH PASSWORD=N'myPassword', 
DEFAULT_LANGUAGE=[us_english], 
CHECK_EXPIRATION=OFF, 
CHECK_POLICY=OFF 
GO

https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms176042(v=sql.110).aspx

|improve this answer|||||
  • Upvoted for inclusion of optional fields disabling policy and expiration checks. – Archibald Apr 11 '18 at 18:39
8

Try this (replace 'user' with the actual login name):

IF NOT EXISTS(
SELECT name 
FROM [master].[sys].[syslogins]
WHERE NAME = 'user')

BEGIN 
    --create login here
END
|improve this answer|||||
  • @Marc: Sorry but you're wrong. Table [syslogins] keeps logins and table [sysusers] keep users. – abatishchev Feb 15 '10 at 18:57
6

This works on SQL Server 2000.

use master
select count(*) From sysxlogins WHERE NAME = 'myUsername'

on SQL 2005, change the 2nd line to

select count(*) From syslogins WHERE NAME = 'myUsername'

I'm not sure about SQL 2008, but I'm guessing that it will be the same as SQL 2005 and if not, this should give you an idea of where t start looking.

|improve this answer|||||
5

what are you exactly want check for login or user ? a login is created on server level and a user is created at database level so a login is unique in server

also a user is created against a login, a user without login is an orphaned user and is not useful as u cant carry out sql server login without a login

maybe u need this

check for login

select 'X' from master.dbo.syslogins where loginname=<username>

the above query return 'X' if login exists else return null

then create a login

CREATE LOGIN <username> with PASSWORD=<password>

this creates a login in sql server .but it accepts only strong passwords

create a user in each database you want to for login as

CREATE USER <username> for login <username>

assign execute rights to user

 GRANT EXECUTE TO <username>

YOU MUST HAVE SYSADMIN permissions or say 'sa' for short

you can write a sql procedure for that on a database

create proc createuser
(
@username varchar(50),
@password varchar(50)
)
as
begin
if not exists(select 'X' from master.dbo.syslogins where loginname=@username)
begin
 if not exists(select 'X' from sysusers where name=@username)
 begin
exec('CREATE LOGIN '+@username+' WITH PASSWORD='''+@password+'''')
exec('CREATE USER '+@username+' FOR LOGIN '+@username)
exec('GRANT EXECUTE TO '+@username)
end
end
end
|improve this answer|||||
3

In order to hande naming conflict between logins, roles, users etc. you should check the type column according to Microsoft sys.database_principals documentation

In order to handle special chacters in usernames etc, use N'<name>' and [<name>] accordingly.

Create login

USE MASTER
IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM master.sys.server_principals WHERE 
[name] = N'<loginname>' and [type] IN ('C','E', 'G', 'K', 'S', 'U'))
    CREATE LOGIN [<loginname>] <further parameters>

Create database user

USE <databasename>
IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM sys.database_principals WHERE 
[name] = N'<username>' and [type] IN ('C','E', 'G', 'K', 'S', 'U'))
    CREATE USER [<username>] FOR LOGIN [<loginname>]

Create database role

USE <databasename>
IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT 1 FROM sys.database_principals WHERE 
[name] = N'<rolename>' and Type = 'R')
    CREATE ROLE [<rolename>]

Add user to role

USE <databasename>
EXEC sp_addrolemember N'<rolename>', N'<username>'

Grant rights to role

USE <databasename>
GRANT SELECT ON [<tablename>] TO [<rolename>]
GRANT UPDATE ON [<tablename>] ([<columnname>]) TO [<rolename>]
GRANT EXECUTE ON [<procedurename>] TO [<rolename>]
|improve this answer|||||
2

This is for Azure SQL:

IF (EXISTS(SELECT TOP 1 1 FROM sys.sql_logins WHERE [name] = '<login>'))
    DROP LOGIN [<login>];

Source: How to check whether database user already exists in Azure SQL Database

|improve this answer|||||
-1

First you have to check login existence using syslogins view:

IF NOT EXISTS 
    (SELECT name  
     FROM master.sys.server_principals
     WHERE name = 'YourLoginName')
BEGIN
    CREATE LOGIN [YourLoginName] WITH PASSWORD = N'password'
END

Then you have to check your database existence:

USE your_dbname

IF NOT EXISTS
    (SELECT name
     FROM sys.database_principals
     WHERE name = 'your_dbname')
BEGIN
    CREATE USER [your_dbname] FOR LOGIN [YourLoginName] 
END
|improve this answer|||||
  • 1
    I dunno - saying that "you have to check login existence using syslogins view", then posting code that doesn't use that view looks like a copy and paste issue. Also, after the first statement, the line "Then you have to check your database existence", using parallel form, looks like you are asking someone to check for the existence of a database, not a DB level user. And you need to specify that the second batch needs to be run inside the target DB. Overall, this is just a very poor explanation. And since you added it five years after the highest upvoted answer said the same, but better... – Laughing Vergil Aug 2 '17 at 20:53

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