58

Does this do what I think it does? It seems to me that yes. I am asking to be sure.

if n[i] == n[i+1] == n[i+2]:
    return True

Are these equal?

if n[i] == n[i+1] and n[i+1] == n[i+2]:
    return True
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55

It is equivalent to but not equal to, since accesses are only performed once. Python chains relational operators naturally (including in and is).

The easiest way to show the slight difference:

>>> print(1) == print(2) == print(3)
1
2
3
True
>>> print(1) == print(2) and print(2) == print(3)
1
2
2
3
True

print() always returns None, so all we are doing is comparing Nones here, so the result is always True, but note that in the second case, print(2) is called twice, so we get two 2s in the output, while in the first case, the result is used for both comparisons, so it is only executed once.

If you use pure functions with no side-effects, the two operations end up exactly the same, but otherwise they are a little different.

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  • 4
    It's worth noting they are not the same, as it is possible to contrive a scenario where one works and the other fails (n is an object that changes the value of n[i+1] after an access). Edit: I have edited in an example to show the difference. – Gareth Latty Dec 10 '12 at 17:33
  • @GarethLatty both of your examples return True. Didn't you mean to put an example where one's False? – joel Nov 3 '19 at 11:02
  • @JoelBerkeley It took me a second to work out what I was trying to show there as well, after 7 years. The point is that they both return the same result, but the side effects are different: one prints 2 twice. I've added some more explanation to make that clear. – Gareth Latty Nov 3 '19 at 15:12
  • @GarethLatty it is possible to make it so that one's False and the other True, with a object that updates on every call. I feel that's more at least as important as side efffects. I can add an example – joel Nov 3 '19 at 19:05
  • @JoelBerkeley That is just another example of a side effect, but yeah, no harm in adding more examples to clarify the point. – Gareth Latty Nov 3 '19 at 20:34
15

Yes, however, when the comparisons are chained the common expression is evaluated once, when using and it's evaluated twice. In both cases the second comparison is not evaluated if the first one is false, example from the docs:

Comparisons can be chained arbitrarily, e.g., x < y <= z is equivalent to x < y and y <= z, except that y is evaluated only once (but in both cases z is not evaluated at all when x < y is found to be false).

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7

As answered by others, the answer is yes. However: beware of adding parentheses. For example:

>>> 1 == 2 == 0
False
>>> (1 == 2) == 0
True

In the second case, (1 == 2) evaluates to False, and then False == 0 evaluates to True, because Python allows comparison of booleans to integers.

Likewise:

>>> 0 == 0 == 1
False
>>> (0 == 0) == 1
True
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5

yes you are correct ....

you can also do

5 > x > 1

or

1 < x < 5
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2

Yep, at the python's internals the comparison operators returns nor true neither false, they instead return the 'comparison result' object (cannot remember the class name, it was quite in past), and this object provides the _lt_, _gt_, _eq_ etc etc methods and become 'responsible' for the final result (and the 'comparison result' is casting to True or False at end of statement). That's a magic of semantic control python provides to you :)

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1

It seems that you can also chain == with !=:

>>> a = b = c = 1
>>> a == b == c
True
>>> a == b == c == 1
True
>>> a == b == c == 2
False
>>> a == b == c != 2
True
>>> a == b == c != 1
False
>>> 
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1

You can use set collection to test the equality

>>> a, b, c = 2, 2, 2
>>> len({a, b, c}) == 1
True
>>> a, b, c = 2, 2, 3
>>> len({a, b, c}) == 1
False
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