This question already has an answer here:

I know this syntax

var=`myscript.sh`

or

var=$(myscript.sh)

Will capture the result (stdout) of myscript.sh into var. I could redirect stderr into stdout if I wanted to capture both. How to save each of them to separate variables?

My use case here is if the return code is nonzero I want to echo stderr and suppress otherwise. There may be other ways to do this but this approach seems it will work, if it's actually possible.

marked as duplicate by Jonathan Leffler bash Jul 31 '15 at 3:50

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • ah , there is no way to capture both without temp file, see my answer here which show how to get stderr and pass stdout to the screen (in case of dialog): stackoverflow.com/a/13427218/815386 – zb' Dec 10 '12 at 18:16
  • here is additional info mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/002 What you cannot do is capture stdout in one variable, and stderr in another, using only FD redirections. You must use a temporary file (or a named pipe) to achieve that one. – zb' Dec 10 '12 at 18:17
  • is there some specific reason why you don't want to use temp files? Using temp files is very much idiomatic within a bash programming environment – frankc Dec 10 '12 at 18:54
  • Related (and having a pretty easy solution): Bash script - store stderr in variable – Izzy Nov 16 '14 at 20:50
  • @eicto Yes, there is a way, read here. – user2350426 Mar 1 '15 at 23:12
up vote 23 down vote accepted

There is no way to capture both without temp file.

You can capture stderr to variable and pass stdout to user screen (sample from here):

exec 3>&1                    # Save the place that stdout (1) points to.
output=$(command 2>&1 1>&3)  # Run command.  stderr is captured.
exec 3>&-                    # Close FD #3.

# Or this alternative, which captures stderr, letting stdout through:
{ output=$(command 2>&1 1>&3-) ;} 3>&1

But there is no way to capture both stdout and stderr:

What you cannot do is capture stdout in one variable, and stderr in another, using only FD redirections. You must use a temporary file (or a named pipe) to achieve that one.

  • Thanks - accepting this answer because using file descriptors 3 and above avoids using "temp files" per what I intended to mean by temp files (even if technically, literally, a temp file). – djechlin Dec 11 '12 at 21:25
  • 1
    Thank you. Based on this answer I'm using fd 3 to send extra information between two scripts, and capturing it from the calling script using { output=$(command 3>&1 1>&4-) ;} 4>&1 – Enrico Mar 20 '16 at 22:06

There's a really ugly way to capture stderr and stdout in two separate variables without temporary files (if you like plumbing), using process substitution, source, and declare appropriately. I'll call your command banana. You can mimic such a command with a function:

banana() {
    echo "banana to stdout"
    echo >&2 "banana to stderr"
}

I'll assume you want standard output of banana in variable bout and standard error of banana in variable berr. Here's the magic that'll achieve that (Bash≥4 only):

. <({ berr=$({ bout=$(banana); } 2>&1; declare -p bout >&2); declare -p berr; } 2>&1)

So, what's happening here?

Let's start from the innermost term:

bout=$(banana)

This is just the standard way to assign to bout the standard output of banana, the standard error being displayed on your terminal.

Then:

{ bout=$(banana); } 2>&1

will still assign to bout the stdout of banana, but the stderr of banana is displayed on terminal via stdout (thanks to the redirection 2>&1.

Then:

{ bout=$(banana); } 2>&1; declare -p bout >&2

will do as above, but will also display on the terminal (via stderr) the content of bout with the declare builtin: this will be reused soon.

Then:

berr=$({ bout=$(banana); } 2>&1; declare -p bout >&2); declare -p berr

will assign to berr the stderr of banana and display the content of berr with declare.

At this point, you'll have on your terminal screen:

declare -- bout="banana to stdout"
declare -- berr="banana to stderr"

with the line

declare -- bout="banana to stdout"

being displayed via stderr.

A final redirection:

{ berr=$({ bout=$(banana); } 2>&1; declare -p bout >&2); declare -p berr; } 2>&1

will have the previous displayed via stdout.

Finally, we use a process substitution to source the content of these lines.


You mentioned the return code of the command too. Change banana to:

banana() {
    echo "banana to stdout"
    echo >&2 "banana to stderr"
    return 42
}

We'll also have the return code of banana in the variable bret like so:

. <({ berr=$({ bout=$(banana); bret=$?; } 2>&1; declare -p bout bret >&2); declare -p berr; } 2>&1)

You can do without sourcing and a process substitution by using eval too (and it works with Bash<4 too):

eval "$({ berr=$({ bout=$(banana); bret=$?; } 2>&1; declare -p bout bret >&2); declare -p berr; } 2>&1)"

And all this is safe, because the only stuff we're sourceing or evaling are obtained from declare -p and will always be properly escaped.


Of course, if you want the output in an array (e.g., with mapfile, if you're using Bash≥4—otherwise replace mapfile with a whileread loop), the adaptation is straightforward.

For example:

banana() {
    printf 'banana to stdout %d\n' {1..10}
    echo >&2 'banana to stderr'
    return 42
}

. <({ berr=$({ mapfile -t bout < <(banana); } 2>&1; declare -p bout >&2); declare -p berr; } 2>&1)

and with return code:

. <({ berr=$({ mapfile -t bout< <(banana; bret=$?; declare -p bret >&3); } 3>&2 2>&1; declare -p bout >&2); declare -p berr; } 2>&1)
  • 3
    Awesome answer — this is so powerful! – Adrian Günter Aug 26 '15 at 0:35
  • @gniourf_gniourf I am able to use your eval example and replicate the same banana output. Next, I tried to pass in a command via variable and have it working with ls "foo" but am having issues with ls "foo bar" -- note the space in the quoted string. In the latter case, I am seeing the following error captured in berr: ls: cannot access "foo: No such file or directory ls: cannot access bar": No such file or directory This leads me to believe the quoting around the file path is not sufficient to escape the space. Can you think of a solution for this? BTW setting IFS='' did not work. – John Mark Mitchell Apr 13 '16 at 19:53
  • @gniourf_gniourf The article Bash: Preserving Whitespace Using set and eval has me wondering if whitespace preservation with eval is the root issue. I am not certain I understand the issue well enough at this point to determine how to resolve it yet. – John Mark Mitchell Apr 13 '16 at 20:36
  • 1
    @JohnMarkMitchell You're using an antipattern here! Don't put commands into variables!. – gniourf_gniourf Apr 14 '16 at 20:41
  • 2
    so you basically generate source code dynamically! ingenious! thx vm! – Aquarius Power Oct 17 '16 at 3:36

You can do:

OUT=$(myscript.sh 2> errFile)
ERR=$(<errFile)

Now $OUT will have standard output of your script and $ERR has error output of your script.

  • Sorry, I forgot to specify without temp files. – djechlin Dec 10 '12 at 18:13

An easy, but not elegant way: Redirect stderr to a temporary file and then read it back:

TMP=$(mktemp)
var=$(myscript.sh 2> "$TMP")
err=$(cat "$TMP")
rm "$TMP"

While I have not found a way to capture stderr and stdout to separate variables in bash, I send both to the same variable with…

result=$( { grep "JUNK" ./junk.txt; } 2>&1 )

… then I check the exit status “$?”, and act appropriately on the data in $result.

# NAME
#   capture - capture the stdout and stderr output of a command
# SYNOPSIS
#   capture <result> <error> <command>
# DESCRIPTION
#   This shell function captures the stdout and stderr output of <command> in
#   the shell variables <result> and <error>.
# ARGUMENTS
#   <result>  - the name of the shell variable to capture stdout
#   <error>   - the name of the shell variable to capture stderr
#   <command> - the command to execute
# ENVIRONMENT
#   The following variables are mdified in the caller's context:
#    - <result>
#    - <error>
# RESULT
#   Retuns the exit code of <command>.
# SOURCE
capture ()
{
    # Name of shell variable to capture the stdout of command.
    result=$1
    shift

    # Name of shell variable to capture the stderr of command.
    error=$1
    shift

    # Local AWK program to extract the error, the result, and the exit code
    # parts of the captured output of command.
    local evaloutput='
        {
            output [NR] = $0
        }
        END \
        {
            firstresultline = NR - output [NR - 1] - 1
            if (Var == "error") \
            {
                for (i = 1; i < firstresultline; ++ i)
                {
                    printf ("%s\n", output [i])
                }
            }
            else if (Var == "result") \
            {
                for (i = firstresultline; i < NR - 1; ++ i)
                {
                    printf ("%s\n", output [i])
                }
            }
            else \
            {
                printf ("%d", output [NR])
            }
        }'

    # Capture the stderr and stdout output of command, as well as its exit code.
    local output="$(
    {
        local stdout
        stdout="$($*)"
        local exitcode=$?
        printf "\n%s\n%d\n%d\n" \
               "$stdout" "$(echo "$stdout" | wc -l)" "$exitcode"
    } 2>&1)"

    # extract the stderr, the stdout, and the exit code parts of the captured
    # output of command.
    printf -v $error "%s" \
                     "$(echo "$output" | gawk -v Var="error" "$evaloutput")"
    printf -v $result "%s" \
                      "$(echo "$output" | gawk -v Var="result" "$evaloutput")"
    return $(echo "$output" | gawk "$evaloutput")
}
  • 3
    This is wrong: the assignment result=$(command) is run in a subshell: everything inside the parentheses in error=$( ... ) is in a subshell; hence result will never be seen. You can try it yourself: c() { echo >&2 'to stderr'; echo 'to stdout'; }; error=$( { result=$(c); } 2>&1); echo "result: $result"; echo "error: $error". You'll see that result is empty. See my answer for a method that actually works. – gniourf_gniourf Feb 15 '15 at 10:21

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