7

I'm writing a REST service using Jersey. I have an abstract class Promotion that has an annotation:

@JsonTypeInfo(use = JsonTypeInfo.Id.CLASS)

Thanks to that, when I return a list of objects:

@GET
@Produces(MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON)
@Path("promotions/")
public List<Promotion> getClosestPromotions() {
List<Promotion> promotions = getPromotions(); //here I get some objects

return promotions;
}

I get a Json string with a "@class" field for every object in that list. But the problem is that if I return a Response:

@GET
@Produces(MediaType.APPLICATION_JSON)
@Path("promotions/")
public Response getClosestPromotions() {
List<Promotion> promotions = getPromotions(); //here I get some objects

return Response.ok().entity(promotions).build();
}

I'm getting almost the same list, but without additional "@class" field. Why is that and what can I do to get a list with "@class" field returning a list in Response? And by the way, surprisingly, it works when I return a Response with one Promotion object only given as an entity and I get that "@class" field.

  • 1
    I don't have enough for an answer yet but. The entity method accepts an Object. The underlying code probably inspects the type at runtime to recover type info. Unfortunately this will get it as far as List and not List<Promotion>. It writes it as a list without generic type info, hence you would loose the class field. Writing an object which has the list as a member variable will probably work but I am trying to come up with something cleaner. – Usman Ismail Dec 18 '12 at 14:15
5
+50

Maybe you would want to try:

GenericEntity<Collection<Promotion>> genericEntity = 
           new GenericEntity<Collection<Promotion>>(promotions){};
return Response.ok().entity(genericEntity).build();
  • 1
    This is a simple solution that works very well, thank you for sharing it! The only downside is that we have to remember to wrap our collections this way all the time. – Stijn de Witt Apr 3 '16 at 13:17
2

Try adding the sub types annotation, here is an example that I am using. This may solve your problem by specifying all the operable sub types. Sorry didn't test your exact example.

@JsonTypeInfo(use = JsonTypeInfo.Id.CLASS, include = JsonTypeInfo.As.PROPERTY, property = "@class")
@JsonSubTypes({
    @JsonSubTypes.Type(value=MetricCollection.class),
    @JsonSubTypes.Type(value=Column.class),
    @JsonSubTypes.Type(value=IntegerColumn.class),
    @JsonSubTypes.Type(value=DoubleColumn.class),
    @JsonSubTypes.Type(value=StringColumn.class)
})
public interface IMetricCollection<T extends IMetric> {
...
}
0

If you used JAXB to generate your classes, you can certainly have something like @XmlElements with different types to parse a List.

Now, if you are also using the same JAXB classes with Jersey/Jackson, you can enhance the metadata of the class by adding @JsonTypeInfo and @JsonSubTypes to describe how to format the name of the List/Array of objects.

While @JsonTypeInfo describes the type to be added, the @JsonSubTypes gives the options of the enclosed collection. For instance, As.PROPERTY to define a property of the output, as displayed in the example below, where a list of entities that can have elements of different types, including the type itself ("Form") in addition to 2 other types "Field" and "Table".

public class Form {

  @XmlElements({
    @XmlElement(name = "field", type = Field.class),
    @XmlElement(name = "form", type = Form.class),
    @XmlElement(name = "table", type = Table.class)
  })
  @JsonTypeInfo(use = Id.NAME, include = As.PROPERTY, property = "obj")
  @JsonSubTypes({
    @JsonSubTypes.Type(value = Field.class),
    @JsonSubTypes.Type(value = Form.class),
    @JsonSubTypes.Type(value = Table.class)
  })
  @Generated(value = "com.sun.tools.internal.xjc.Driver", date = "2013-11-11T02:08:36-08:00", comments = "JAXB RI v2.2.4-2")
  @JsonProperty("entities")
  protected List<Object> fieldOrFormOrTable;

The serialization of the object using Jersey's Jackson default serializers with the added metadata will be the following...

     "entities": [
                  {
                    "obj": "Table",
                    "row": {
                        "id": 1,
                        "fields": [
                            {
                                "id": "DEBUGARY",
                                "type": "Text",
                                "kind": "user"
                            }
                        ]
                    },
                    "id": "DBGARRAY"
                },
                {
                    "obj": "field",
                    "id": "IDBG",
                    "type": "Text",
                    "kind": "user"
                },
        ..., ..., ...]

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