I have three classes one of the name is User and this user have other classes instances. Like this;

public class User{
    @OneToMany(fetch=FetchType.LAZY, cascade = CascadeType.ALL)
    public List<APost> aPosts;

    @OneToMany(fetch=FetchType.LAZY, cascade = CascadeType.ALL)
    public List<BPost> bPosts;
}




   public class BPost extends Post {

    @ManyToOne(fetch=FetchType.LAZY)    
    public User user;
 }

    public class APost extends Post {

     @ManyToOne(fetch=FetchType.LAZY) 
     public User user;
 }

it's working like this but generates emty tables in db. Which have to contains foreign keys. When I tried to use mappedBy and JoinColumn annotains I got failed. How can I resolve this?

Extra information:

When I changed with;

 @ManyToOne(fetch=FetchType.LAZY)
 @JoinColumn(name="id")
 public User user;

and

 @OneToMany(fetch=FetchType.LAZY, cascade = CascadeType.ALL, mappedBy="id")
 public List<APost> aPosts;

I'm getting

A JPA error occurred (Unable to build EntityManagerFactory): Repeated column in mapping for entity: models.post.APost column: id (should be mapped with insert="false" update="false")

Final Edit: Finally, I was totaly wrong about jpa annotaions. :( When i change

@OneToMany(fetch=FetchType.LAZY, cascade = CascadeType.ALL, mappedBy="id")

to

@OneToMany(fetch=FetchType.LAZY, cascade = CascadeType.ALL, mappedBy="user")

and

@ManyToOne(fetch=FetchType.LAZY)
@JoinColumn(name="user_id")

everthing works ok. :)

  • How exactly did you fail? What are you seeking help with, precisely? And if the first solution worked for you why not stick with it? – Perception Dec 11 '12 at 0:49
  • because jpa creates User_APost and User_BPost tables but it's not adding any row to this tables. And it feels me wrong. – Ömer Faruk AK Dec 11 '12 at 7:07
up vote 18 down vote accepted

As I explained in this article and in my book, High-Performance Java Persistence, you should never use the unidirectional @OneToMany annotation because:

  1. It generates inefficient SQL statements
  2. It creates an extra table which increases the memory footprint of your DB indexes

Now, in your first example, both sides are owning the association, and this is bad.

While the @JoinColumn would let the @OneToMany side in charge of the association, it's definitely not the best choice. Therefore, always use the mappedBy attribute on the @OneToMany side.

public class User{
    @OneToMany(fetch=FetchType.LAZY, cascade = CascadeType.ALL, mappedBy="user")
    public List<APost> aPosts;

    @OneToMany(fetch=FetchType.LAZY, cascade = CascadeType.ALL, mappedBy="user")
    public List<BPost> bPosts;
}

public class BPost extends Post {

    @ManyToOne(fetch=FetchType.LAZY)    
    public User user;
}

public class APost extends Post {

     @ManyToOne(fetch=FetchType.LAZY) 
     public User user;
}
  • I have been trying this. However, I keep getting a stack overflow due to the obvious circular reference (User has list of APost, which has the user, which has a list of APost, ... Stack Overflow error). Any pointers on that? – Roger Worrell Sep 12 '17 at 18:53
  • The only way to get a StackOverflow is by calling from the child a method from the parent which in turn calls the same method in the child.However, that's not due to the mapping I proposed you. – Vlad Mihalcea Sep 12 '17 at 19:07
  • Thanks Vlad. I just found stackoverflow.com/questions/17445657/… which seems to indicate it's the serialization of the object to JSON that is causing the problem. – Roger Worrell Sep 12 '17 at 20:35

I am not really sure about your question (the meaning of "empty table" etc, or how mappedBy and JoinColumn were not working).

I think you were trying to do a bi-directional relationships.

First, you need to decide which side "owns" the relationship. Hibernate is going to setup the relationship base on that side. For example, assume I make the Post side own the relationship (I am simplifying your example, just to keep things in point), the mapping will look like:

(Wish the syntax is correct. I am writing them just by memory. However the idea should be fine)

public class User{
    @OneToMany(fetch=FetchType.LAZY, cascade = CascadeType.ALL, mappedBy="user")
    private List<Post> posts;
}


public class Post {
    @ManyToOne(fetch=FetchType.LAZY)
    @JoinColumn(name="user_id")
    private User user;
}

By doing so, the table for Post will have a column user_id which store the relationship. Hibernate is getting the relationship by the user in Post (Instead of posts in User. You will notice the difference if you have Post's user but missing User's posts).

You have mentioned mappedBy and JoinColumn is not working. However, I believe this is in fact the correct way. Please tell if this approach is not working for you, and give us a bit more info on the problem. I believe the problem is due to something else.


Edit:

Just a bit extra information on the use of mappedBy as it is usually confusing at first. In mappedBy, we put the "property name" in the opposite side of the bidirectional relationship, not table column name.

  • i have add extra information to post adrian. It contains errors when i changed my annotations with your suggestions. – Ömer Faruk AK Dec 11 '12 at 7:59
  • fixed extra information – Ömer Faruk AK Dec 11 '12 at 13:16
  • sorry bro, i couldn't understand your answer at first. :) – Ömer Faruk AK Dec 11 '12 at 14:35
  • 2
    @WowBow it is simply because his problem is solely related to the way to do bi-directional mapping, and have nothing to do with multiple one-to-many relationship. Won't update the answer as I want to keep the answer away from unnecessary distraction unrelated to problem. If you have other problem, feel free to raise it as another question. – Adrian Shum Sep 24 '15 at 0:05
  • 2
    @WowBow if your question is about how to have 2 sub-class, and you want to have method in User to get corresponding aPosts and bPosts, there are lots of ways. My personal preference is to make it simple: have User having one-to-many relationship to Post, and provide getters for getAPosts() and getBPosts() simply by run-time filtering the internal Collection<Post>. You can also do it like OP, while treating APost and BPost as totally different entity and maintain its own user relationship (There is nothing more than defining 2 OneToMany relationship using described way). – Adrian Shum Sep 24 '15 at 1:16

Since you will be saving APost and BPost directly, this means APost and BPost will be relationship owner. Since user doesn't owns the relationship, there will be an attribute mappedBy in @OneToMany annotation.

public class User{
    @OneToMany(fetch=FetchType.LAZY, cascade = CascadeType.ALL,mappedBy="user", targetEntity = APost.class)
    public List<APost> aPosts;

    @OneToMany(fetch=FetchType.LAZY, cascade = CascadeType.ALL,mappedBy="user", targetEntity = BPost.class)
    public List<BPost> bPosts;
}

public class BPost extends Post {
    @ManyToOne(fetch=FetchType.LAZY)  
    @JoinColumn(name="user_id",referencedColumnName="id")  
    public User user;
}

public class APost extends Post {
    @ManyToOne(fetch=FetchType.LAZY) 
    @JoinColumn(name="user_id",referencedColumnName="id")
    public User user;
}

@JoinColumn annotation will be responsible for adding foreign key in Apost and BPost.

  • 1
    This should be a comment, not an answer. If it is a duplicate question then vote to close as such and/or leave a comment once you earn enough reputation. If the question is not a duplicate then tailor the answer to this specific question. – Bhargav Rao Nov 8 '16 at 12:36

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