99

Consider the following program:

#include <string>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

struct T
{
    int a;
    double b;
    string c;
};

vector<T> V;

int main()
{
    V.emplace_back(42, 3.14, "foo");
}

It doesn't work:

$ g++ -std=gnu++11 ./test.cpp
In file included from /usr/include/c++/4.7/x86_64-linux-gnu/bits/c++allocator.h:34:0,
                 from /usr/include/c++/4.7/bits/allocator.h:48,
                 from /usr/include/c++/4.7/string:43,
                 from ./test.cpp:1:
/usr/include/c++/4.7/ext/new_allocator.h: In instantiation of ‘void __gnu_cxx::new_allocator<_Tp>::construct(_Up*, _Args&& ...) [with _Up = T; _Args = {int, double, const char (&)[4]}; _Tp = T]’:
/usr/include/c++/4.7/bits/alloc_traits.h:253:4:   required from ‘static typename std::enable_if<std::allocator_traits<_Alloc>::__construct_helper<_Tp, _Args>::value, void>::type std::allocator_traits<_Alloc>::_S_construct(_Alloc&, _Tp*, _Args&& ...) [with _Tp = T; _Args = {int, double, const char (&)[4]}; _Alloc = std::allocator<T>; typename std::enable_if<std::allocator_traits<_Alloc>::__construct_helper<_Tp, _Args>::value, void>::type = void]’
/usr/include/c++/4.7/bits/alloc_traits.h:390:4:   required from ‘static void std::allocator_traits<_Alloc>::construct(_Alloc&, _Tp*, _Args&& ...) [with _Tp = T; _Args = {int, double, const char (&)[4]}; _Alloc = std::allocator<T>]’
/usr/include/c++/4.7/bits/vector.tcc:97:6:   required from ‘void std::vector<_Tp, _Alloc>::emplace_back(_Args&& ...) [with _Args = {int, double, const char (&)[4]}; _Tp = T; _Alloc = std::allocator<T>]’
./test.cpp:17:32:   required from here
/usr/include/c++/4.7/ext/new_allocator.h:110:4: error: no matching function for call to ‘T::T(int, double, const char [4])’
/usr/include/c++/4.7/ext/new_allocator.h:110:4: note: candidates are:
./test.cpp:6:8: note: T::T()
./test.cpp:6:8: note:   candidate expects 0 arguments, 3 provided
./test.cpp:6:8: note: T::T(const T&)
./test.cpp:6:8: note:   candidate expects 1 argument, 3 provided
./test.cpp:6:8: note: T::T(T&&)
./test.cpp:6:8: note:   candidate expects 1 argument, 3 provided

What is the correct way to do this and why?

(Also tried single and double braces)

6
  • 4
    That will work if you provide an appropriate constructor.
    – chris
    Dec 11 '12 at 2:34
  • 3
    Is there a way to construct it in-place with the automatically created brace struct constructor used by T t{42,3.14, "foo"}? Dec 11 '12 at 2:38
  • 4
    I don't think that takes the form of a constructor. It's aggregate initialization.
    – chris
    Dec 11 '12 at 2:41
  • 6
  • 6
    I am not trying to affect your opinion in any way.. But in case you did not give attention to thin question from a while.. The accepted answer, with full respect to its writer, is not an answer at all to your question and may mislead the readers. Nov 8 '16 at 18:16
108

You need to explicitly define a ctor for the class:

#include <string>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

struct T
{
    int a;
    double b;
    string c;

    T(int a, double b, string &&c) 
        : a(a)
        , b(b)
        , c(std::move(c)) 
    {}
};

vector<T> V;

int main()
{
    V.emplace_back(42, 3.14, "foo");
}

The point of using emplace_back is to avoid creating a temporary object, which is then copied (or moved) to the destination. While it is also possible to create a temporary object, then pass that to emplace_back, it defeats (at least most of) the purpose. What you want to do is pass individual arguments, then let emplace_back invoke the ctor with those arguments to create the object in place.

5
  • 12
    I think better way would be to write T(int a, double b, string c) : a(a), b(b), c(std::move(c))
    – balki
    Apr 24 '13 at 17:30
  • 9
    The accepted answer defeats the purpose of emplace_back. This is the correct answer. This is how emplace* work. They construct the element in-place using the forwarded arguments. Hence, a constructor is needed to take said arguments. Jul 13 '16 at 21:28
  • 1
    still, vector could provide an emplace_aggr, right? Aug 14 '17 at 19:38
  • @balki Right, there's no point taking c by && if nothing is done with its possible rvalueness; at the initialiser of the member, the argument is treated as an lvalue again, in the absence of a cast, so the member just gets copy-constructed. Even if the member was move-constructed, it's not idiomatic to require callers always to pass a temporary or std::move()d lvalue (though I will confess that I have a few corner-cases in my code where I do that, but only in implementation details). Jun 25 '18 at 19:27
  • Problem with this is that the struct then no longer is POD Jun 8 at 18:13
32

For anyone from the future, this behavior will be changed in C++20.

In other words, even though implementation internally will still call T(arg0, arg1, ...) it will be considered as regular T{arg0, arg1, ...} that you would expect.

1
  • I don't see how this answers the question that was asked. Can you clarify?
    – MarkR
    Jul 31 at 6:26
28

Of course, this is not an answer, but it shows an interesting feature of tuples:

#include <string>
#include <tuple>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

using T = tuple <
    int,
    double,
    string
>;

vector<T> V;

int main()
{
    V.emplace_back(42, 3.14, "foo");
}
3
  • 10
    It certainly isn't an answer. what's so interesting about it? any type with a ctor can be emplaced in this way. tuple has a ctor. the op's struct didn't. that's the answer. Jul 13 '16 at 21:53
  • 8
    @underscore_d: I'm not sure that I remember every detail of what I was thinking 3½ years ago, but I thinj what I was suggesting was that if you just use a tuple instead of defining a POD struct, then you get a constructor for free, which means that you get the emplace syntax for free (among other things -- you also get lexicographic ordering). You lose member names, but sometimes it's less bother creating accessors than all the rest of the boilerplate you would otherwise need. I agree that Jerry Coffin's answer is much better than the accepted one. I also upvoted it years ago.
    – rici
    Jul 13 '16 at 22:56
  • 3
    Yeah, spelling it out helps me understand what you meant! Good point. I agree that sometimes the generalisation is bearable when weighed against the other stuff the STL provides for us: I use that semi-often with pair... but sometimes wonder if I really gain much in net terms, heh. But perhaps tuple will follow in the future. Thanks for expanding! Jul 13 '16 at 23:03
13

If you do not want to (or cannot) add a constructor, specialize allocator for T (or create your own allocator).

namespace std {
    template<>
    struct allocator<T> {
        typedef T value_type;
        value_type* allocate(size_t n) { return static_cast<value_type*>(::operator new(sizeof(value_type) * n)); }
        void deallocate(value_type* p, size_t n) { return ::operator delete(static_cast<void*>(p)); }
        template<class U, class... Args>
        void construct(U* p, Args&&... args) { ::new(static_cast<void*>(p)) U{ std::forward<Args>(args)... }; }
    };
}

Note: Member function construct shown above cannot compile with clang 3.1(Sorry, I don't know why). Try next one if you will use clang 3.1 (or other reasons).

void construct(T* p, int a, double b, const string& c) { ::new(static_cast<void*>(p)) T{ a, b, c }; }
2
  • In your allocate function, don't you need to worry about alignment? See std::aligned_storage Dec 13 '12 at 0:26
  • No Problem. According to specification, effects of "void* ::operator new(size_t size)" are "The allocation function called by a new-expression to allocate size bytes of storage suitably aligned to represent any object of that size." Dec 13 '12 at 12:51
6

This seems to be covered in 23.2.1/13.

First, definitions:

Given a container type X having an allocator_type identical to A and a value_type identical to T and given an lvalue m of type A, a pointer p of type T*, an expression v of type T, and an rvalue rv of type T, the following terms are defined.

Now, what makes it emplace-constructible:

T is EmplaceConstructible into X from args , for zero or more arguments args, means that the following expression is well-formed: allocator_traits::construct(m, p, args);

And finally a note about the default implementation of the construct call:

Note: A container calls allocator_traits::construct(m, p, args) to construct an element at p using args. The default construct in std::allocator will call ::new((void*)p) T(args), but specialized allocators may choose a different definition.

This pretty much tells us that for a default (and potentially the only) allocator scheme you must have defined a constructor with the proper number of arguments for the thing you're trying to emplace-construct into a container.

-2

you have to define a constructor for your type T because it contains an std::string which is not trivial.

moreover, it would be better to define (possible defaulted) move ctor/assign (because you have a movable std::string as member) -- this would help to move your T much more efficient...

or, just use T{...} to call overloaded emplace_back() as recommended in neighboug response... everything depends on your typical use cases...

5
  • A move constructor is automatically generated for T Dec 11 '12 at 2:39
  • 1
    @AndrewTomazos-Fathomling: only if no user ctors are defined
    – zaufi
    Dec 11 '12 at 2:41
  • 1
    Correct, and they are not. Dec 11 '12 at 2:46
  • @AndrewTomazos-Fathomling: but you have to define some, to avoid temporary instance on emplace_back() call :)
    – zaufi
    Dec 11 '12 at 2:48
  • 1
    Actually incorrect. A move constructor is automatically generated provided no destructor, copy constructor or assignment operators are defined. Defining a 3 argument memberwise constructor for use with emplace_back will not supress the default move constructor. Dec 11 '12 at 2:54
-2

You can create the struct T instance and then move it to the vector:

V.push_back(std::move(T {42, 3.14, "foo"}));
2
  • 3
    You don't need to std::move() a temporary object T{...}. It's already a temporary object (rvalue). So you can just drop the std::move() from your example. Jan 30 '20 at 14:48
  • 1
    Moreover, even the type name T isn't necessary - the compiler can guess it. So just a "V.push_back{42, 3.14, "foo"}" will work. Jan 30 '20 at 14:49
-8

You can use the {} syntax to initialize the new element:

V.emplace_back(T{42, 3.14, "foo"});

This may or may not be optimized, but it should be.

You have to define a constructor for this to work, note that with your code you can't even do:

T a(42, 3.14, "foo");

But this is what you need to have emplace work.

so just:

struct T { 
  ...
  T(int a_, double b_, string c_) a(a_), b(b_), c(c_) {}
}

will make it work the desired way.

9
  • 10
    Will this construct a temporary and then move construct it into the array? - or will it construct the item inplace? Dec 11 '12 at 2:34
  • 3
    The std::move is not necessary. T{42, 3.14, "foo"} will already be forwarded by emplace_back and bind to the struct move constructor as an rvalue. However I would prefer a solution that constructs it in-place. Dec 11 '12 at 2:42
  • 38
    in this case move is almost exactly equivalent to copy, so the whole point of emplacing is missed.
    – Alex I.
    Dec 11 '12 at 4:33
  • 5
    @AlexI. Indeed! This syntax creates a temporary, which is passed as the argument to 'emplace_back'. Completely misses the point.
    – aldo
    Sep 9 '13 at 22:57
  • 5
    I do not understand all negative feedback. Won't compiler use RVO in this case? Apr 23 '17 at 13:24

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.