32

I have some code like this:

for(var id=0; id < message.receiver.length; id++){
   var tmp_id = id;
   zlib.gzip(JSON.stringify(message.json), function(err, buffer){
                        ...
   pushStatusPool[message.receiver[tmp_id]] = null; // fix memory leak
   delete pushStatusPool[message.receiver[tmp_id]];
   ...
   });
}

And I got a warning that using tmp_id in closure may cause problem because it is a mutable variable.

How could I avoid that? I mean how could I send an immutable variable to callback since this is a for loop and I can not change code of zlib.gzip? Or in other words, how could I pass a argument to a closure?

  • 1
    How can you avoid what? Your question is not clear. Please be a lot more specific with what you want help with. – jfriend00 Dec 11 '12 at 4:18
  • 1
    I started writing a response... but it becomes really clear that this could use a refactor :( You're gzipping the same thing message.receiver.length times. Post the entire thing? – brianreavis Dec 11 '12 at 4:33
41

You need to create a scope to correctly capture tmp_id using a self-executing function. That's because the entire for loop is one scope, meaning each time through, you're capturing the same variable. So the callback will end up with the wrong ids, because temp_id's value will get changed before the callback is called.

I'd ignore (or shut off) the warning, though, which seems to be complaining that because temp_id is mutable, you might reassign it. That's sort of silly. If you really want to fix it, try using the const keyword instead of var.

for(var id=0; id < message.receiver.length; id++){
   (function(){
       const tmp_id = id;
       zlib.gzip(JSON.stringify(message.json), function(err, buffer){
                        ...
           pushStatusPool[message.receiver[tmp_id]] = null; // fix memory leak
           delete pushStatusPool[message.receiver[tmp_id]];
           ...
       });
   })();
}
  • 1
    thanks! that's what I want. I'm using webstorm produced by JetBrains. – bxshi Dec 11 '12 at 7:17
  • 4
    In his code he wasn't capturing any variable—javascript has function scope, not block scope. The tmp_id variable within the callback would vary depending on when it was executed. And in your example, the const keyword isn't really needed... var would do the trick :) – brianreavis Dec 11 '12 at 7:29
  • @brianreavis Good point about the execution time. I failed to notice that gzip would execute asynchronously, so the function scope is crucial. Will edit. I don't know anything about Webstorm, but without the const the OP's still capturing a mutable variable (i.e. I could change tmp_id after calling gzip) and it sounds like that's what the warning is complaining about. – user24359 Dec 11 '12 at 7:36
  • @brianreavis - no, it's the variables that are mutable or immutable here, and it's variables that are captured, so nothing to do with value vs reference types. To illustrate the issue here, try this: jsfiddle.net/rD82j, and watch what it prints in the console. Then change var to const and run it again. That's what the warning is trying to help with. – user24359 Dec 11 '12 at 19:12
  • I'm not arguing that the variable isn't mutable—I'm arguing that there is no use for const in this context, or any context. It's bad practice (it makes code not compatible in other variations of ECMAScript) and shouldn't be used just for the sake of keeping an IDE happy. – brianreavis Dec 11 '12 at 20:02
11

I have faced the same problem and solved it slightly modifying the answer of user24359, by passing the id to the closure:

for(var id=0; id < message.receiver.length; id++){
   (function(tmp_id){
       zlib.gzip(JSON.stringify(message.json), function(err, buffer){
                        ...
           pushStatusPool[message.receiver[tmp_id]] = null; // fix memory leak
           delete pushStatusPool[message.receiver[tmp_id]];
           ...
       });
   })(id);
}
  • i like this approach – rupps Nov 28 '17 at 12:43
2

here a simplification of user24359's great answer. This is the solution:

var object = {a:1,b:2};

for (var y in object){
    (function(){const yyy = y;
        setTimeout(function(){console.log(yyy)},3000);})();
}

The above code logs a b and is the solution. The following code logs b b :

var object = {a:1,b:2};
for (var y in object){

    setTimeout(function(){console.log(y)},3000);
}
0

I've faced the same problem in protractor. Solved it using following code -

(function(no_of_agents){
              ptor.element.all(by.repeater('agent in agents').column('displayName')).then(function(firstColumn){
                    console.log(i, '>>>>>Verifying the agent Name');
                    var agentsSorted = sortAgentsByName();
                    //verify the agent name
                    expect(firstColumn[no_of_agents].getText()).toEqual(agentsSorted[no_of_agents].name);
                    //now click on the agent name link
                    firstColumn[no_of_agents].click();
                    ptor.sleep(5000);
              });
            })(no_of_agents);
0

@user24359 answer is a good solution but you can simply replace the var keyword by the let keyword.

for(var id=0;

becomes

for(let id=0;

See details here.

Edit : As Heriberto Juárez suggested it, it will only works for browsers that supports EcmaScript6.

  • 1
    Wouldn't this cause problems in browsers which do not support ECMAScript6? – user8348171 Jan 17 '18 at 21:23
0

Creating closures in a loop with var (tmp_id) being in the upper scope of the callback function is a common mistake that should be avoided due to the var not being block-scoped. Because of this, and because each closure, created in the loop, shares the same lexical environment, the variable will always be the last iterated value (i.e. message.receiver.length - 1 as tmp_id) when the callback function gets invoked. Your IDE detects this behavior and complains rightly.

To avoid the warning, there are several solutions:

  • Replace var with let ensuring each created closure to have its own scoped tmp_id defined in each iteration:

    for (var id = 0; id < message.receiver.length; id++) {
      let tmp_id = id;
      zlib.gzip(JSON.stringify(message.json), function(err, buffer) {
        // Do something with tmp_id ...
      });
    }
    
  • Create a lexical environment in each iteration by leveraging IIFE like gennadi.w did.

  • Create a callback function in each iteration by using a factory function (createCallback):

    const createCallback = tmp_id => function(err, buffer) {
      // Do something with tmp_id ...
    };
    for (var id = 0; id < message.receiver.length; id++) {
      zlib.gzip(JSON.stringify(message.json), createCallback(id));
    }
    
  • bind the variable(s) on the callback function in which they get prepended to its parameters:

    for (var id = 0; id < message.receiver.length; id++) {
      zlib.gzip(JSON.stringify(message.json), function(tmp_id, err, buffer) {
        // Do something with tmp_id (passed as id) ...
      }.bind(this, id));
    }
    

If possible, var should be avoided as of ECMAScript 2015 due to such error-prone behaviors.

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