2

Possible Duplicate:
IE9 array does not support indexOf

My Code:

var arrFruits = ['apple', 'banana', 'carrot', 'dates'];
var position = arrFruits.indexOf( 'carrot' );
position > -1 && arrFruits.splice( position, 1 );
alert( arrFruits );

The above code is displaying the result as apple, banana, dates in Chrome. But it is not working in IE9.

marked as duplicate by Jan Hančič, Peter O., JaredMcAteer, Eric, Mick MacCallum Dec 11 '12 at 18:51

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 2
    What do you mean by "not working"? – Jan Hančič Dec 11 '12 at 8:24
  • What does "not working" mean? It triggers a syntax error? It alerts undefined? It makes the computer explode? – Álvaro González Dec 11 '12 at 8:25
  • specify 'not working' do you get an error? – roel Dec 11 '12 at 8:26
  • Works fine in my IE9, but array indexOf probably does'nt work in IE8- FIDDLE – adeneo Dec 11 '12 at 8:26
  • is this the error that you're getting? "Object doesn't support property or method 'indexOf'" – artsylar Dec 11 '12 at 8:27
6

It may be issue of .indexOf not being supported. It basically is supported in IE9 unless some malicious doctype is triggering it to render page in IE7/8 mode. Than Array.indexOf method is not supported.

I suggest using HTML5 doctype for example (<!DOCTYPE html>) to make sure IE9 is rendering correctly.

  • I agree. Similar post here. – tobias86 Dec 11 '12 at 8:30
2

till IE8 it doesn't have .indexOf method , you can add it like this, if you are using IE9 check for compatibility mode

if (!Array.prototype.indexOf) {
    Array.prototype.indexOf = function (searchElement /*, fromIndex */ ) {
        "use strict";
        if (this == null) {
            throw new TypeError();
        }
        var t = Object(this);
        var len = t.length >>> 0;
        if (len === 0) {
            return -1;
        }
        var n = 0;
        if (arguments.length > 1) {
            n = Number(arguments[1]);
            if (n != n) { // shortcut for verifying if it's NaN
                n = 0;
            } else if (n != 0 && n != Infinity && n != -Infinity) {
                n = (n > 0 || -1) * Math.floor(Math.abs(n));
            }
        }
        if (n >= len) {
            return -1;
        }
        var k = n >= 0 ? n : Math.max(len - Math.abs(n), 0);
        for (; k < len; k++) {
            if (k in t && t[k] === searchElement) {
                return k;
            }
        }
        return -1;
    }
}
  • IE9 does support array.indexOf ? – adeneo Dec 11 '12 at 8:27
  • IE9 does support it. You just need to make sure the page is running in IE9 mode. Old doc types might cause it to run in IE7/8 mode. See this SO question for more info : – tobias86 Dec 11 '12 at 8:30
0

What is this line for

position > -1 && arrFruits.splice( position, 1 );

It evaluateto either true or false and then you don't do anything with it.that's probably causing a syntax error in IE, which the more forgiving Javascript engines on chrome and Firefox are ignoring.

Maybe you meant to make an if statement?

 if(position > -1) {
     arrFruits.splice( position, 1 ); 
}
  • Both solutions work fine on all modern browsers (though the second one is a lot clearer indeed). – Julien Royer Dec 11 '12 at 12:37
  • I presume that means Ie9 treats && as a short-circuiting and? Is that part of the spec or just a convenient ms trick? – just.another.programmer Dec 12 '12 at 7:46

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