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-- FIDDLE --

I'm designing a form that acts like a wizard, walking the user through each input, and not allowing them to continue until all inputs have been addressed.

I want to show the next row in the table if and only if all inputs in the current row have either been filled out or checked. Rows may contain any number of text inputs, checkboxes, or radio groups.

Here's my current code:

<table>
    <tr>
        <td><input type="text"></td>

        <td><input type="radio"></td>
    </tr>

    <tr style="display:none">
        <td><input type='radio'></td>

        <td><input type='checkbox'></td>
    </tr>

    <tr style="display:none">
        <td><input type='text'></td>

        <td><input type='text'></td>
    </tr>
</table>​

function refreshCascadingLists() {
    // Get an array of tr's
    // Loop thorugh each and see if it should be shown based on it's predecessors status
    var prevHadUnselected = false;
    $("table tr").next("tr").each(function(curIdx, curEntity) {
        if (prevHadUnselected) {
            $(this).fadeOut();
        } else {
            $(this).fadeIn();
        }

        prevHadUnselected = false;
        $(this).find(":input").each(function(curSelIdx, curSelEntity) {
            if ($(curSelEntity).val() == "" && $(curSelEntity).not(":checked")) 
                prevHadUnselected = true;
        });
    });
}

$(document).ready(function() {
    $(":input").bind('keyup change', function() {
        refreshCascadingLists();
    });
});​

This will show the next row when the user types into the text box in the first row, but they should also have to check the radio button. Furthermore, it's displaying ALL of the rows in the table, instead of just the next one.

3

I would do something like this:

function refreshCascadingLists($tr) {
    var all_filled = true;
    $tr.find(':input').each(function() {
        if($(this).is('input[type=radio], input[type=checkbox]')) {
            if(!$(this).is(':checked')) {
                all_filled = false;    
            }
        } else if($(this).val() == '') {
            all_filled = false;
        }
    });

    var $next_tr = $tr.next('tr');    
    if(all_filled) {
        if(!$next_tr.is(':visible')) {
            $next_tr.fadeIn(function() {
                refreshCascadingLists($(this));                    
            });    
        }
    } else {
        $tr.nextAll('tr').hide();
    }
}

$(document).ready(function() {
    $(":input").bind('keyup change', function() {
        refreshCascadingLists($(this).closest('tr'));
    });
});​

Most of the function could actually be golfed down quite a bit, but I wrote it like that so you can easily see what it is doing.

  • This works, but in my actual form (I stripped down the situation for the question), it seems to be getting caught on the second row. Thoughts? jsfiddle.net/4T9pc/2 – Jon Dec 11 '12 at 16:17
  • @jon: Think it's the way I'm calculating radio buttons... mmm. – Paolo Bergantino Dec 11 '12 at 16:21
  • Is it because it's expecting the whole group to be checked? – Jon Dec 11 '12 at 16:23
  • 1
    @Jon Yes, try this one: jsfiddle.net/JGkwj/1 - it gets a little more complicated if you can potentially have multiple groups of radios in one row, that version should allow for that. – Paolo Bergantino Dec 11 '12 at 16:29
  • Works! There are some odd conditions throughout, so I might just alter it to require only one of the inputs each row to be filled/checked. Thanks so much for the help. – Jon Dec 11 '12 at 16:32
1

The issue is here $("table tr").next("tr").each(...

You are selecting ALL next rows for each row in $("table tr"). To fix move the .next("tr") inside each().

Here is simplified fiddle

  • Before the function() { ... } ? So $("table tr").each(next("tr") function(curIdx, curEntity) { ... } ? That seems odd. – Jon Dec 11 '12 at 16:04
  • Don't you mean remove it completely? it isn't needed inside the each, the each will automatically go to the next one on the next iteration... – Kevin B Dec 11 '12 at 16:05
  • No no no... You have to call next() on your curEntity or this (which are the same in that context) inside the function you are passing to each(). – Ilia G Dec 11 '12 at 16:06
  • Could you edit the Fiddle? Between you and Kevin, I'm a little lost. – Jon Dec 11 '12 at 16:08
  • 1
    @PaoloBergantino it does now – Ilia G Dec 11 '12 at 16:17

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