0

I have a text file with 4 columns delimited by comma. As I am reading each record in a loop, I want to add a value to the 5th column depending on a condition. So if I know the row number and column number, how can I use awk/sed commands to replace/set value at that particular field without using temporary files? I want to update the file (directly) that I am reading from

inp.txt
a,b,c,d
e,f,g,h
i,j,k,l

Thanks, -sri

2

I can't speak for sed, but the purpose of awk isn't to edit files in place but to write to stdout.

But anyway, here's a solution you don't need a loop for, pretending the condition is that the entry in column 4 is an h.

awk -F ',' '{ if ($4 == "h") print $0",z"; else print $0","}' inp.txt > out.txt

output:

a,b,c,d,
e,f,g,h,z
i,j,k,l,
  • The above could be written more concisely as: awk -F ',' '{print $0 FS ($4 == "h" ? "z" : "")}' inp.txt > out.txt – Ed Morton Dec 12 '12 at 20:30
2

You cannot directly edit the file with either awk or sed. Some versions of sed have an option (-i) that works with a temporary file and overwrites the original file, but it does not actually edit the file in place. This is not a big deal. Just do:

$ awk 'NR==5{ $(NF+1) = "new value"}1' OFS=, FS=, input-file > tmp.$$
$ mv tmp.$$ input-file

To add a new column to row 5 of input-file. If you wish, you can use ed to edit the file, but it makes more sense to use a temporary file. If you want to pretend that you aren't using a temporary file, and your sed supports -i, you can do the same thing with:

sed -i '5s/$/,new value/' input-file

Even though most utilitites do not allow in-place modification of the file, it is simple to use one of the following sh functions to emulate that behavior using temporary files:

edit() { local f=$1; shift; "$@" < $f > $f.$$ && mv $f.$$ $f; }  # Break hard links
edit() { local f=$1; shift; "$@" < $f > $f.$$ && cat $f.$$ > $f && rm $f.$$; }

With either of these, you could use awk to give the appearance of editing files in-place using edit filename awk awk-cmds. The first version breaks hard links, but uses slightly less IO.

1
perl -i -F, -lane 'if($.==<row number>){$F[<column_number>-1]+=<add your stuff here>}print join(",",@F)' your_file

tested below:

>cat temp
b,c,d,g
r,g,d,s

execute for changing the 3rd column in second row:

>perl -i -F, -lane 'if($.==2){$F[2]=10}print join(",",@F)' temp
> cat temp
b,c,d,g
r,g,10,s
0

You mean like this? this is the version don't using any temporary files.

[a@b ~]$ cat tmp | sed 's_^\(.*\),\(.*\),\(.*\),\(.*\)_\1,\2,\3,\4_g' 
inp.txt
a,b,c,d
e,f,g,h
i,j,k,l

[a@b ~]$ cat tmp | sed 's_^\(.*\),\(.*\),\(.*\),\(.*\)_\1,sth,\3,\4_g'
inp.txt
a,sth,c,d
e,sth,g,h
i,sth,k,l

[a@b ~]$ sed -ie 's_^\(.*\),\(.*\),\(.*\),\(.*\)_\1,sth,\3,\4_g' tmp
[a@b ~]$ cat tmp
inp.txt
a,sth,c,d
e,sth,g,h
i,sth,k,l

Cheers,

  • 1
    It IS using a temporary file. Check your sed documentation. – Ed Morton Dec 12 '12 at 20:27
  • Thank you. I learned a new thing. – tsohr Dec 15 '12 at 9:12

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.