45

If I have the following code :

threads = []
(1..5).each do |i|
  threads << Thread.new { `process x#{i}.bin` } 
end
threads.each do |t|
  t.join
  # i'd like to get the output of the process command now.
end

What do I have to do to get the output of the process command? How could I create a custom thread so that I can accomplish this?

5 Answers 5

57

The script

threads = []
(1..5).each do |i|
  threads << Thread.new { Thread.current[:output] = `echo Hi from thread ##{i}` }
end
threads.each do |t|
  t.join
  puts t[:output]
end

illustrates how to accomplish what you need. It has the benefit of keeping the output with the thread that generated it, so you can join and get the output of each thread at any time. When run, the script prints

Hi from thread #1
Hi from thread #2
Hi from thread #3
Hi from thread #4
Hi from thread #5
5
  • Vinay, maybe you can have a look at this too: stackoverflow.com/questions/1383470/…
    – Geo
    Sep 5, 2009 at 14:38
  • 7
    Far nicer to simply return the output from the thread and use puts t.value
    – Yacoby
    Nov 25, 2014 at 13:18
  • why threads do not interleave? Nothing like Hi Hi Hi from thread #1 from...
    – Serge
    Feb 4, 2022 at 4:13
  • @Serge perhaps because of the GIL. Feb 5, 2022 at 6:47
  • @Serge the output doesn't interleave because the printing itself is done serially. Note that the threads themselves don't print anything, all output is done in the loop at the end.
    – Parker
    Apr 21, 2022 at 19:24
41

I found it simpler to use collect to collect the Threads into a list, and use thread.value to join and return the value from the thread - this trims it down to:

#!/usr/bin/env ruby
threads = (1..5).collect do |i|
  Thread.new { `echo Hi from thread ##{i}` }
end
threads.each do |t|
  puts t.value
end

When run, this produces:

Hi from thread #1
Hi from thread #2
Hi from thread #3
Hi from thread #4
Hi from thread #5
1
  • The one downside of this version relative to using Thread.current[:output] is that there is no way to have a timeout using value.
    – mper
    May 26, 2020 at 8:00
23

This is a simple, and interesting way to use Thread#value:

a, b, c = [
  Thread.new { "something" },
  Thread.new { "something else" },
  Thread.new { "what?" }
].map(&:value)

a # => "something"
b # => "something else"
c # => "what?"
2
  • 9
    There is no need to call join because value does that internally. Aug 20, 2018 at 15:31
  • Love this. Also, if one of your threads returns multiple values, you can still assign them by nesting assignments in parentheses e.g. a, (b, c), d = Aug 31, 2022 at 20:52
3

Just use Thread#value:

threads = (1..5).collect do |i|
  Thread.new { `echo x#{i}.bin` }
end
threads.each do |t|
  puts t.value
end
3

You should use the Queue class. Each thread should put its result in the queue, and the main thread should fetch it from there. Notice that using that approach, results my be in a order different from thread creation order in the queue.

2
  • 2
    The Queue class is useful, but not necessary for the original poster's scenario, where there is no thread contention over a single value or collection of values. Therefore, thread locals suffice in this case.
    – sheldonh
    Oct 19, 2011 at 7:28
  • Link is now broken. Dec 10, 2019 at 2:36

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