56

I came across these two methods to concatenate strings:

Common part:

char* first= "First";
char* second = "Second";
char* both = malloc(strlen(first) + strlen(second) + 2);

Method 1:

strcpy(both, first);
strcat(both, " ");       // or space could have been part of one of the strings
strcat(both, second);

Method 2:

sprintf(both, "%s %s", first, second);

In both cases the content of both would be "First Second".

I would like to know which one is more efficient (I have to perform several concatenation operations), or if you know a better way to do it.

  • 5
    As Michalis Giannakidis points out - there's a buffer overflow here; you need to allocate lengths plus two to allow for the space and the terminal null. – Jonathan Leffler Sep 5 '09 at 16:21
  • 2
    From a performance POV, the things to know are that strcat has to scan all the way along the string to find the end before it can append anything, and that sprintf has to parse the format string. Beyond that, if you want to know which is faster for your particular strings, you have to measure it. – Steve Jessop Sep 5 '09 at 16:24
  • 1
    I guess you could also consider that sprintf is a much bigger function than the simple string manipulators, so will likely evict more code from your icache, and hence is more likely to slow down some other, totally unrelated part of your program. But that kind of effect is beyond the point where you can expect to predict performance in advance – Steve Jessop Sep 5 '09 at 16:28
  • Thanks for the buffer overflow info here, I'll edit it now. Thanks for the comments too, very appreciated. – Xandy Sep 5 '09 at 16:38
  • If you have to do a lot of string concatenating, it might be worth using explicit-length strings instead of null-terminated strings. (std::string knows its own length, but it might not optimize as well for compile-time-constant string literals) – Peter Cordes Dec 5 '17 at 5:06

10 Answers 10

72

For readability, I'd go with

char * s = malloc(snprintf(NULL, 0, "%s %s", first, second) + 1);
sprintf(s, "%s %s", first, second);

If your platform supports GNU extensions, you could also use asprintf():

char * s = NULL;
asprintf(&s, "%s %s", first, second);

If you're stuck with the MS C Runtime, you have to use _scprintf() to determine the length of the resulting string:

char * s = malloc(_scprintf("%s %s", first, second) + 1);
sprintf(s, "%s %s", first, second);

The following will most likely be the fastest solution:

size_t len1 = strlen(first);
size_t len2 = strlen(second);

char * s = malloc(len1 + len2 + 2);
memcpy(s, first, len1);
s[len1] = ' ';
memcpy(s + len1 + 1, second, len2 + 1); // includes terminating null
  • 17
    I'd just like to put in a vote of disagreement for your first solution being readable. It's more compact, but is it more readable? I don't think so. I didn't downvote, though. – Imagist Sep 5 '09 at 16:20
  • 2
    It would perhaps be worth mentioning asprintf() which does the memory allocation for you: char *s; int len = asprintf(&s, "%s %s", first, second); without any fuss or muss. – Jonathan Leffler Sep 5 '09 at 16:27
  • 1
    @Jonathan: asprintf() isn't part of the C stdlib and the MS-compiler dosn't support it – Christoph Sep 5 '09 at 16:33
  • 1
    @Christoph: yes, I know asprintf() is not standard; that's why I suggested mention it rather than proposing it as 'the answer'. Perhaps I should have put in the relevant caveats in my original comment, though. (Man page at: linux.die.net/man/3/asprintf, amongst other places.) – Jonathan Leffler Sep 5 '09 at 17:00
  • 1
    For shorter strings memory allocation will be the main bottleneck. Also, discussion of different XXprintf functions is irrelevant, because this method is obviously slowest. – noop Feb 7 '12 at 19:40
24

Don't worry about efficiency: make your code readable and maintainable. I doubt the difference between these methods is going to matter in your program.

  • 6
    I am with Ned. It seems like you are performing premature optimisation. Like girls, it is also the root of all evil (it has multiple roots). Get your program running, then profile it, then optimise. Until then you are just waiting time IMHO. – freespace Sep 5 '09 at 16:05
  • 16
    @Ned: That doesn't answer the question! He asked which way is more efficient, not if he should worry about efficiency or not. – Wadih M. Sep 5 '09 at 16:42
  • 2
    Usage of such programming language actually means that you DO care about efficiency. If you don't, why use unsafe feature-limited language with manual memory management? Also, profiling is overrated. Either you do understand your goals and can predict possible performance bottlenecks, or you don't have a clue, even with help of a profiler. – noop Feb 7 '12 at 19:31
  • 2
    I agree that it might be a case of premature optimization but it is important to recognize (as the OP did) that it might eventually turn up to be a case for optimization. If, in case, it turns out to be bottleneck and such string concatenations are done all over the program, then it will be a problem. To mitigate that risk AND of-course for better readability, I would factor this into a function, say strConstructConcat(), and put either Method 1 or Method 2 into it and be done it with until profiling shows it to be a bottleneck. – Arun Mar 14 '13 at 22:17
  • 3
    -1 does not answer the question ; also, from the question you can't be able to determine if the optimization is premature or not. +1 for @Arun there for actually proposing factoring it out into a function for more flexibility (which is something which actually could help the OP) – griffin Jul 31 '13 at 14:23
18

Here's some madness for you, I actually went and measured it. Bloody hell, imagine that. I think I got some meaningful results.

I used a dual core P4, running Windows, using mingw gcc 4.4, building with "gcc foo.c -o foo.exe -std=c99 -Wall -O2".

I tested method 1 and method 2 from the original post. Initially kept the malloc outside the benchmark loop. Method 1 was 48 times faster than method 2. Bizarrely, removing -O2 from the build command made the resulting exe 30% faster (haven't investigated why yet).

Then I added a malloc and free inside the loop. That slowed down method 1 by a factor of 4.4. Method 2 slowed down by a factor of 1.1.

So, malloc + strlen + free DO NOT dominate the profile enough to make avoiding sprintf worth while.

Here's the code I used (apart from the loops were implemented with < instead of != but that broke the HTML rendering of this post):

void a(char *first, char *second, char *both)
{
    for (int i = 0; i != 1000000 * 48; i++)
    {
        strcpy(both, first);
        strcat(both, " ");
        strcat(both, second);
    }
}

void b(char *first, char *second, char *both)
{
    for (int i = 0; i != 1000000 * 1; i++)
        sprintf(both, "%s %s", first, second);
}

int main(void)
{
    char* first= "First";
    char* second = "Second";
    char* both = (char*) malloc((strlen(first) + strlen(second) + 2) * sizeof(char));

    // Takes 3.7 sec with optimisations, 2.7 sec WITHOUT optimisations!
    a(first, second, both);

    // Takes 3.7 sec with or without optimisations
    //b(first, second, both);

    return 0;
}
  • Thanks for the benchmarking! It's really appreciated! Regarding the time spent with and without optimizations in the first case, -O2 may perform some optimizations which result in slower code in favour of smaller code (linuxjournal.com/article/7269). Thanks for your answer and time. – Xandy Sep 5 '09 at 20:31
  • 1
    Having just looked at the generated instructions, the -O2 code is bigger as well as slower! The problem looks to be that gcc is using the "repne scasb" instruction to find the length of the string. I suspect that that instruction is very slow on modern hardware. I'm going to find a gcc expert to ask about this. – Andrew Bainbridge Sep 5 '09 at 23:02
  • 1
    @Andrew Bainbridge, a little bit OT, but you can use &lt; and &gt; for < and > – quinmars Sep 7 '09 at 14:59
  • 1
    @Andrew Bainbridge: You can also indent by 4 spaces to format as code. Then you don't have to escape < and > and you also get syntax highlighting. – bk1e Sep 7 '09 at 20:18
  • 3
    Try using -march=generic. mingw defaults to i586 which is really really old, outdated and makes assumptions that will fit – LiraNuna Sep 7 '09 at 20:22
6
size_t lf = strlen(first);
size_t ls = strlen(second);

char *both = (char*) malloc((lf + ls + 2) * sizeof(char));

strcpy(both, first);

both[lf] = ' ';
strcpy(&both[lf+1], second);
  • 1
    That strcat should be a second strcpy - this is undefined behavior as written. – Steve Jessop Sep 5 '09 at 16:18
  • 1
    +1 - you spotted the buffer overflow! – Jonathan Leffler Sep 5 '09 at 16:18
  • 2
    In fact, one could use memcpy, since the length are already calculated :) – Filip Navara Sep 5 '09 at 16:22
  • But, as @onebyone points out, the strcat() is not OK this time, because the strcat() starts tracking after the space, and you don't know what characters are in the string at that point. – Jonathan Leffler Sep 5 '09 at 16:23
  • 3
    @onebyone: optimized versions of memcpy() will copy multiple bytes per iteration step; strcpy() may also do this, but it still has to examine every single byte to check for the terminating 0; therefore I'd expect memcpy() to be faster – Christoph Sep 5 '09 at 17:39
2

They should be pretty much the same. The difference isn't going to matter. I would go with sprintf since it requires less code.

2

The difference is unlikely to matter:

  • If your strings are small, the malloc will drown out the string concatenations.
  • If your strings are large, the time spent copying the data will drown out the differences between strcat / sprintf.

As other posters have mentioned, this is a premature optimization. Concentrate on algorithm design, and only come back to this if profiling shows it to be a performance problem.

That said... I suspect method 1 will be faster. There is some---admittedly small---overhead to parse the sprintf format-string. And strcat is more likely "inline-able".

  • The strcat version scans the full length of the first string four times, whereas the sprintf version only does so twice. So when the first string is very very long, the strcat version will eventually end up slower. – caf Sep 7 '09 at 1:42
1

sprintf() is designed to handle far more than just strings, strcat() is specialist. But I suspect that you are sweating the small stuff. C strings are fundamentally inefficient in ways that make the differences between these two proposed methods insignificant. Read "Back to Basics" by Joel Spolsky for the gory details.

This is an instance where C++ generally performs better than C. For heavy weight string handling using std::string is likely to be more efficient and certainly safer.

[edit]

[2nd edit]Corrected code (too many iterations in C string implementation), timings, and conclusion change accordingly

I was surprised at Andrew Bainbridge's comment that std::string was slower, but he did not post complete code for this test case. I modified his (automating the timing) and added a std::string test. The test was on VC++ 2008 (native code) with default "Release" options (i.e. optimised), Athlon dual core, 2.6GHz. Results:

C string handling = 0.023000 seconds
sprintf           = 0.313000 seconds
std::string       = 0.500000 seconds

So here strcat() is faster by far (your milage may vary depending on compiler and options), despite the inherent inefficiency of the C string convention, and supports my original suggestion that sprintf() carries a lot of baggage not required for this purpose. It remains by far the least readable and safe however, so when performance is not critical, has little merit IMO.

I also tested a std::stringstream implementation, which was far slower again, but for complex string formatting still has merit.

Corrected code follows:

#include <ctime>
#include <cstdio>
#include <cstring>
#include <string>

void a(char *first, char *second, char *both)
{
    for (int i = 0; i != 1000000; i++)
    {
        strcpy(both, first);
        strcat(both, " ");
        strcat(both, second);
    }
}

void b(char *first, char *second, char *both)
{
    for (int i = 0; i != 1000000; i++)
        sprintf(both, "%s %s", first, second);
}

void c(char *first, char *second, char *both)
{
    std::string first_s(first) ;
    std::string second_s(second) ;
    std::string both_s(second) ;

    for (int i = 0; i != 1000000; i++)
        both_s = first_s + " " + second_s ;
}

int main(void)
{
    char* first= "First";
    char* second = "Second";
    char* both = (char*) malloc((strlen(first) + strlen(second) + 2) * sizeof(char));
    clock_t start ;

    start = clock() ;
    a(first, second, both);
    printf( "C string handling = %f seconds\n", (float)(clock() - start)/CLOCKS_PER_SEC) ;

    start = clock() ;
    b(first, second, both);
    printf( "sprintf           = %f seconds\n", (float)(clock() - start)/CLOCKS_PER_SEC) ;

    start = clock() ;
    c(first, second, both);
    printf( "std::string       = %f seconds\n", (float)(clock() - start)/CLOCKS_PER_SEC) ;

    return 0;
}
  • A quick modification of my test (posted in a separate answer) revealed that converting method 1, with the malloc and free, into C++ using std::string was less than half the speed of the C version. The body of the loop was just "both = first + std::string(" ") + second;" However, the C++ is better in all kinds of other ways. – Andrew Bainbridge Sep 5 '09 at 18:37
  • Ah, reading the question again, I see how sprintf() would be faster that two strcat() calls, for the reasons mentioned in Joel's article. I am surprised that a std::string implementation was slower, but goes to show you have to measure if you need to know! – Clifford Sep 5 '09 at 20:51
  • Did you notice that method function a goes around its loop 48 times more than function b or function c? That was my dumb way of demonstrating the performance multiple. Posting the actual timings like you did is much more sensible. The timings I got on mingw gcc 4.4 (with the 48 times multiple removed) were: C string handling = 0.093000 seconds sprintf = 0.266000 seconds std::string = 0.766000 seconds And for Visual Studio 2005 (haven't got 2008 unfortunately): C string handling = 0.047000 seconds sprintf = 0.343000 seconds std::string = 0.485000 seconds – Andrew Bainbridge Sep 5 '09 at 22:36
  • Here are the timings (1000000 loop times for all) in a Core 2 Duo 2.0 GHz (all of them compiled without optimizations): Small strings: GCC 4.4: C string handling = 0.093 secs., sprintf = 0.328 secs, std::string = 1.560 secs. VC++ 2008: C string handling = 0.062 secs., sprintf = 0.296 secs., std::string = 1.498 secs. Intel C++ Compiler: C string handling = 0.109 secs. sprintf = 0.281 secs. std::string = 0.249 secs. Interesting results those of Intel's. – Xandy Sep 5 '09 at 23:27
  • Larger strings (120 and 140 characters each) and equal loops (1000000), all of them compiled from command line without optimizations (g++, cl and icl strings.cpp): GCC 4.4: C string handling = 0.250 secs., sprintf = 2.355 secs., std::string = 1.779 secs.; VC++ 2008: C string handling = 0.280 secs., sprintf = 2.216 secs., std::string = 4.836 secs.; Intel C++ Compiler: C string handling = 0.748 secs., sprintf = 2.465 secs., std::string = 3.214 secs. By the way, very interesting the article by Joel Spolsky. – Xandy Sep 5 '09 at 23:29
0

I don't know that in case two there's any real concatenation done. Printing them back to back doesn't constitute concatenation.

Tell me though, which would be faster:

1) a) copy string A to new buffer b) copy string B to buffer c) copy buffer to output buffer

or

1)copy string A to output buffer b) copy string b to output buffer

  • The OP is proposing sprintf(dst, "%s %s", first, second) to concat in memory, not regular printf. For what you're suggesting, probably one call to printf would be the fastest way, because fputs / putchar / fputs has to lock / unlock stdout (or whatever output stream) multiple times. – Peter Cordes Dec 5 '17 at 4:59
0
  • strcpy and strcat are much simpler oprations compared to sprintf, which needs to parse the format string
  • strcpy and strcat are small so they will generally be inlined by the compilers, saving even one more extra function call overhead. For example, in llvm strcat will be inlined using a strlen to find copy starting position, followed by a simple store instruction
-1

Neither is terribly efficient since both methods have to calculate the string length or scan it each time. Instead, since you calculate the strlen()s of the individual strings anyway, put them in variables and then just strncpy() twice.

  • 5
    why should he use strncpy() if he knows the strings' sizes? memcpy() is your friend! – Christoph Sep 5 '09 at 15:59

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