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Possible Duplicate:
Do-While and if-else statements in C/C++ macros
What’s the use of do while(0) when we define a macro?

I often see a code like this:

#define foo() do { xxx; yyy; zzz; } while (0)

Why do-while wrapper is used here? Why not simply

#define foo() { xxx; yyy; zzz; }

?

EDIT : removed semicolon.

marked as duplicate by William Pursell, Bill Lynch, Steve-o, nos, wnoise Dec 12 '12 at 20:18

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    I bet you rather see #define foo() do { xxx; yyy; zzz; } while (0) (without the trailing semi-colon - that's exactly why...) – user529758 Dec 12 '12 at 18:41
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    search for [c]while (0) in the SO search bar, you'll get piles of answers to this. – Mike Dec 12 '12 at 18:42
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    Link from other post does answer the question: gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/cpp/Swallowing-the-Semicolon.html – mlibby Dec 12 '12 at 19:18
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    @Lundin - See the answer (link) from user:raghava on that other post. – Mike Dec 12 '12 at 19:26
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    @Lundin The 4th code block of the accepted answer addresses that portion of the question. – William Pursell Dec 12 '12 at 19:53
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Here's the simple answer.

#define foo() do { xxx; yyy; zzz; } while (0)
#define foo() { xxx; yyy; zzz; }

if (condition)
    foo();
else
    x++;

When you use the do-while version, that will get correctly expanded to:

if (condition)
    do { xxx; yyy; zzz; } while (0);
else
    x++;

When you use the {} version, that will get expanded to this, which is a syntax error (no matching if for the else). Note the extra semicolon in the second line.

if (condition3)
    { xxx; yyy; zzz; };
else
    x++;